When would you prefer the "Fun Maps" to be set.

  • When the timeline ends.

    Votes: 7 25.0%
  • The present day.

    Votes: 18 64.3%
  • I don't care.

    Votes: 3 10.7%

  • Total voters
    28
Normally I like to wait to post a chapter to try to avoid retcons. I'll make a note if I change anything. Normally it should only be names of things (I've been trying to come-up with a name other than Columbia for a post restoration North America to highlight a difference, but I haven't been able to come up with something I like.)
 
Normally I like to wait to post a chapter to try to avoid retcons. I'll make a note if I change anything. Normally it should only be names of things (I've been trying to come-up with a name other than Columbia for a post restoration North America to highlight a difference, but I haven't been able to come up with something I like.)
Avalon, maybe?
 
New work in progress official styling for the King of Britain:

by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of the British Isles King, and Territorial Lord of New Albion, Defender of the Faith, Arch-treasurer, Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, High King of India, Great Patriarch of Indiana, and King of the English and Irish.

Not entirely sold on the title "Territorial Lord of New Albion" yet though.
I won't finalize it until I get the next chapter up, probably sometime post-June-ish.
 
New work in progress official styling for the King of Britain:

by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of the British Isles King, and Territorial Lord of New Albion, Defender of the Faith, Arch-treasurer, Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, High King of India, Great Patriarch of Indiana, and King of the English and Irish.

Not entirely sold on the title "Territorial Lord of New Albion" yet though.
I won't finalize it until I get the next chapter up, probably sometime post-June-ish.
Well, that's an extremely long title that won't make anyone ITTL universe confused at all...
 
New work in progress official styling for the King of Britain:

by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of the British Isles King, and Territorial Lord of New Albion, Defender of the Faith, Arch-treasurer, Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, High King of India, Great Patriarch of Indiana, and King of the English and Irish.

Not entirely sold on the title "Territorial Lord of New Albion" yet though.
I won't finalize it until I get the next chapter up, probably sometime post-June-ish.
Yeah, maybe better to have King/Emperor of New Albion?
 
Well, that's an extremely long title that won't make anyone ITTL universe confused at all...
You should look up Franz Joseph's official style, it literally normally contains an etc. in it.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Joseph_I_of_Austria

In all honesty, it is long for OTL 1815 but not that much. I haven't checked but I wouldn't be surprised if Spain's OTL style at this time was just as long or longer. The thing to remember is no one actually said the official style in even formal settings, they were reserved for ceremony only.
Yeah, maybe better to have King/Emperor of New Albion?
King would be most likely. The problem with emperor is there is no precedent for it in ATL yet. Without Napoleon declaring himself emperor the European imperial title is still only linked with the Romans and Holy Roman Empire. So job title inflation in ATL only effects the official style so far. (I do have plans for a non-European empire but that won't show up until after Part IX is finished.)

To be honest the issue is my own personal linguistics pedantry. New Albion is officially a dominion. Linguistically the ruler of a dominion should be a dominus, in English a lord. But lord doesn't evoke how I want the position to feel (nor does it translate well).

Other ideas I have are:
Dominus (usually a religious or educational title and literally Latin translation for lord),
Domnus (Latin shorting of dominus, not technically an English though),
Domine (normally a religious or educational title),
Dominator (obvious why this isn't my first choice), or
Lord Something (i.e. territorial lord, lord protector, royal lord, high lord, lord-king, lord president, lord minister, lord director, lord executive, lord proprietor, lord potentate, lord regnant, etc.)
 
Last edited:
Working on the timeline over the week-end, the next chapter isn't ready yet, but I have worked out my title conundrum.

The official style is: “by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of the British Isles King, and Regnant of New Albion, Defender of the Faith, Arch-treasurer, Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, High King of India, and Great Patriarch of Indiana".

I also made one other change to noble tiles that I wanted to do originally but couldn't think of a title. I separated ruling princes from princes of the blood/crowned princes. Like how the German language does it.

Primarch is a new "invented" title for ruling prince, their realm is know as a Primarchate now.
Prince is used for every other type of prince.
 
IX-2: The First True Dominion
Had enough time (and writer's block) to finish the next chapter while working on my freelance work.

Chapter 2: The First True Dominion​

—AD 1815—

Swā hēo begann hold, swā hēo stent [*]
Motto of the Dominion of New Albion
Arms of New Albion 1815 CE.png

Coat of Arms of the Dominion of New Albion [†] [cxv]
Reforms were not limited to just Britain, British America had to undergo its own extensive reforms. However, its reforms did not necessarily have to be the same. George IV was still monarch over area. And after three internal conflicts in the forty years, most of the British Americans were just ready to have some peace.

It was decided that the British Americas would have a similar status to what it had prior to the commonwealth years. This type of state would (in English) become known as a dominion, taken from the official name of the state. While the British Americas would still have some autonomy from the Kingdom of Britain the name Columbia was still associated with trying to gain as much autonomy as possible (mostly due to the name of the Columbian Conflict). Since very few British Americans, especial those with political influence, wanted to promote the idea of being disloyal or rebellious in anyway the name was dropped. Instead, the dominion was named New Albion (New England was the originally proposal, but that was rejected by the southern provinces as it already was used as a regional name for the northern provinces, New Albion was derived as a compromise).
§​
Since New Albion was technically a different country, George IV adopted a new title. However, no one wanted New Albion’s title being higher than or even equivalent to King of the Britain Isles. As a result, George IV was just given the title Lord Regnant of New Albion, thought he was usually referred to as “the king” in conversation.

While New Albion was a different country, it was by designed, a dependent country. The lord regnant appointed his representative which was the governor general. The governor general’s other main duty was to present the concerns of New Albion to the British government. The British Great Thing still served as the highest legislative body. New Albion was also a federative state, so each province did have its own fully functional government.

The provinces were free to outline their own specifics for government (within reason), most of the differences were found in the town or city level. Each province’s head of government was a lieutenant governor appointed by the governor general. The provinces legislature consisted of an upper house, who were appointed by the lieutenant governor. And a lower house, who were elected by the populace. All nobility automatically received the right to vote and voting was also theoretically open to all male citizens of age, however each province was able to place certain additional requirements [‡]; these were more common the further south the province was.

City and town governments fell into three categories. The most common form of town and city governments was elected mayors. Second, and the most popular in New England and north eastern New York [§], was city and town councils. Third was the landgraviate, these were generally very rural counties that did not have the population to form a proper local government, so a landgrave would rule instead (though most areas like this were not landgraviates and governed directly by the provincial government).

New Albion had three degrees of nobility, none of which were hereditary. All nobles had to have their privileges granted by the lord regnant, though the provinces could suggest candidates through the governor general. Landgraves were the highest, and had similar privileges to that of an earl, though there were never that many of them at any given time. Next were the cassiques, who had the privileges of a manorial lord. These included any patroons who could still prove their manor, they could still style themselves as a patroon but there was no distinction made between the two. And finally, were the esquires. Generally, the rank of esquire was granted as a reward for service, either civilly or militarily. Esquires could be found in any province, while cassiques and landgraves were more common the further south one went.
§​
The Dominion of New Albion was divided into 13 provinces. There were no formal division that were greater than the provinces, but there were some informal ones. Part of the compromises made with the British government was the reorganization of the provinces. The restructuring of the internal divisions was one of the British American’s main problems with the commonwealth’s rule. (Unlike the people living in the British Isles, the lower and more remote populations of British North America made dodging other disliked laws easier). The only big change to the provinces was the consolidation of North and South Carolina, the rest of the changes that concerned the border with Indiana.
  • The northern provinces were often referred to as New England. These were: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Nova Scotia [‖], and Rhode Island.
  • The middle provinces were: Delaware, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.
  • Southern provinces, often being called simply The South or Dixieland consisted of: Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia.

Several provinces, mostly in the north, tried to push for abolishing slavery. However, slaver did remain legal. It was unheard-of in all of the northern provinces and rare in most of the middle ones, but still legal. Britain did do a blanket ban of the slave trade in all of its territories. That severely limited the practice in New Albion but was not enough to end it.
§​
Unitarianism did gain a foot old in British North America during the commonwealth years, but it never grew to the same size as in the British Isles. Instead, the religious breakdown of New Albion was a bit more complicated. Anglicanism did still exist, but it consisted of only those who refused to abandon it, despite not having any leadership for sixteen years. Presbyterianism was a large group, and was the most likely destination for those who left Anglicanism when the country was a republic. What did begin to catch on and grow was a new sect of Christianity called the Neo-Waldensians. The Neo-Waldensians were the product of the Baptists and Methodist sects (as well as some others) trying to survive the pressures of the commonwealth’s favoritism of Unitarianism.
§​
New Albion adopted Britain’s new calendar and measurement policies without issue. While it gained the ability to mint its own currency, they were locked into using the pound.

Languages changes were significantly less in New Albion than in Britain. The New Albionians did adopt the use of goodman, goodwife, and goodmaid [¶]. The people also picked up some grammatical quirks that gained traction in Britain [70]. Norman vocabulary, however, was not stigmatized in New Albion. For example, New Albionians would still use terms such as “Great Thing” instead of “the Parliament,” as that was a proper name, but words like dominion and esquire continued to be used.

It took a while, but Gaelic type would eventually become the dominant style of typeface in New Albion. But the typefaces made in New Albion would usually keep Latinate feature, making them look odd and disjointed to those in Britain.
§​
Since it was normally an independent country, New Albion had its own military. Its military was copied directly from Britain’s. Its commander-in-chief was the Lord Regnant of New Albion. The only main difference was that the New Albion military switched out the navy blue for cadet blue, used tricorne hats, and of course they had their own regimental flag (which switched out the defaced bicolor with thirteen stripes with a dragon in the canton), and cockade (the Irish light blue was replaced with black).
***​

Dominion of New Albion​

Ꝺomınıon oꝼ New Albıon
(Dominion of New Albion)
1686073431162.png
Flag of New Albion [#] [cxvi], Arms of New Albion [cxv], and Location of New Albion (red) [cviii]
Motto:“Sƿá héo begann hold sƿá héo stent” (ang)
(Loyal she began, loyal she remains)​
Anthem:"The Bold Albionian"
Capital:Georgetown
Largest city:Philadelphia
Official language:English
Official religion:Anglicanism
Common religion:Neo-Waldenism
Demonym:New Albionian
Government:
• Lord Regnant
• Governor-General
Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy
Georg IV
Sir Gordon Drummond
Legislature:
• Upper house
• Lower house
Parliament
House of Senators​
House of Commons​
Formed:from the Commonwealth of England
Currency:New Albionian pound (£)

Footnotes​

* ang: Loyal she began, loyal she remains.​
† While the supporters are officially described as lions and they are always depicted as such in Britain, in New Albion they usually take on a more mountain lion appearance in New Albion.​
‡ Generally, a poll tax, literacy tax, or grandfather policy (the son or grandson of any New Albionian or British noble, who didn’t hold a title themselves). Which one or a combination varied from province to province.​
§ As part of the treaty to end the Vermont Rebellion the area was granted limited autonomy from the rest of New York.​
‖ Used interchangeably with New Scotland.​
¶ While abbreviations were not popular in English at the time, speakers on both sides of the Atlantic would have understood Gm., Gw., and Gmd. respectively. In New Albion the shortened version of “goody” (used for all three) was very common informally but it would be insulting in Britain as it came to mean mistress.​
# Very popular unofficial civil ensign.​

Endnotes​

70. Generally, it would just make the language seem archaic when compared to OTL.​
cxv. (Modified from sources: Sodacan et al.)​
cxvi. (Modified from sources: Hoshie et al.)​
OSeveno, Lion rampant guardant as supporter (Or). 3 March 2019. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lion_rampant_guardant_as_supporter_(Or).svg. Accessed 22 May 2023.​

Also, since Dorset is much more prominent now and has more international influence, International English may sound like OTL "pirate talk".


In ATL, every day is talk like a pirate day!
 

Attachments

  • State of New Albion 1815 CE.png
    State of New Albion 1815 CE.png
    270.2 KB · Views: 167
Last edited:
IX-3: British India & Indiana

Chapter 3: British India & Indiana​

—AD 1815—
Mıꝺ Ᵹoꝺeꞅ ᵹıeꝼe, cynınᵹ [*]
Motto of British India & British Indiana
1686073746390.png

Coronet of British Indiana [cxvii]​

New Albion began the experiment with idea of dominions, British India and British Indiana took the idea in a different route. They both had provinces that were under direct rule of the British monarch under the title of lord regnant. However, that was only a part of the whole. Both had princely states which were directly ruled by a local monarch under the British monarch. To ensure a higher prestige over the local princes George IV took additional titles as the lord of the other princes. And these additional titles were the ones used officially, despite the territories legally being dominions.
§​
In theory, the Indian Commonwealth ended the East India Company’s rule of British India. However, the reality was not so simple. Most of the politicians and all the federal executives used to be major shareholders in the company. After the Indian Commonwealth was overthrown, technically the loyalist military took charge of the ruling the area as a military government. But the military just made sure that the local monarchs kept their loyalty to the king and ignored everything else that was not connected to retaking of Britain.

British India’s restoration government was based on off New Albion’s, but it had a few princely states, the main one was the Kingdom of Oudh. Some other changes were made, such as a unicameral legislature with only appointed legislatures. Since George IV would rarely if ever actually be in India, the governor-general would serve as viceroy in his stead.

As far as the other changes, British India was like other realms, while most of the common Indians kept doing what they had always done. The government used the Newtonian calendar, and English, when it was spoken, shifted but less than what was spoken in Britain. Religion stayed mostly the same as it was before the commonwealth. As the Unitarians were pluralists, it was believed that that would be more acceptable to the natives. So, Unitarianism was set up as the politically associated religion. However, despite this, none of the local prince or populace were any more accepting of it than they were other forms western religions. Currency was standardized to be like Britain’s but it used the British Indian rupee.
§​
On paper, British Indiana followed the same route to British India, but the ground situation would look rather different. First off, in the beginning, India only had one major princely state but most of Indiana was princely states. But the most influential difference was with the resident ministers. Indian state would have British residential minister, but they restricted themselves to advising the government (as that was their job description). In Indiana though, the minister took on the larger role of “teaching” the states how to operate as a western style nation. Most of the ministers did not outright replace the Amerindian governments, that would have been too much work. Instead, they let the political traditions and culture syncretize as they promoted other things, such as sedentary agriculture, schools, western religions, a western style military etc. Tribes that were part of British Indiana (and other similar states from other nations) ceased to be called tribes by westerners and were now called states.

What actually grew out of this syncretism was pan-Amerindianism (sometime known as north pan-Amerindianism). This took root for a few reasons. One was that the communication between the Amerindian states were more open. What little roads were constructed did make communication more open, and local conflicts were fewer (the British Indianan government would arbitrate a conflict between member states). The resident minister would also seldom bother to learn particular traditions, preferring to lump various Amerindian traditions together and promoting that over a state’s traditional practices. Paradoxically, many Amerindians used pan-Amerindianism themselves to preserve the more important common traditions. If a tradition shared between a few states had a good chance to survive, then a tradition shared between most or all the states had a better chance to survive.

None of the ministers would allow a women direct position in the government. However, that did not keep any matriarchal influence from coming in. The Amerindian states were free to set their own rules for the succession of their princes. The princes could also get secondary advice from whomever they want. And clan mothers were often seen as like a queen mother, so the minister did respect them even if they tried to keep them out of the government.

At its creation, there were only two provinces ruled directly by the British Indianan government. These two areas represented regions where most British settlers encroached a crossed the old Columbian border into Amerindian land during the commonwealth times. These were the provinces of Kentucky and Kanawha; they had similar provincial governments to those found in the middle and south New Albion.

All Protestant missionaries were allowed in British Indiana, but like India Unitarianism was the state default for the same reason. Indiana used the British Indianan wampum as a currency, and all official measurements and calendars were the same as Britain. However, the common Amerindians rarely used the British standard measurements and calendar if they could avoid it.

Each princely state was required to maintain a standing army and provide troops whenever called upon, however the size of that army depended on the size of the state. Kentucky and Kanawha had two different types of companies. European companies were always recruited with the same methods as the current British soldiers were in Britain. However, Amerindian towns had quotas to fill. The Indianan braves [71] functioned similarly to the Indian sepoys. The two different types of companies were kept always separate, when possible. The equipment was standard British military equipment except for the hats (Europeans wore slouch hats while Amerindians use fur hats). The uniforms were a different shade of dark blue. Interestingly, while European officers were told to use standard pattern British sabers, Amerindians company officers were issued tomahawks.
***​

The Title of High King​

The decision to use the title of high king for India was not actually a simple one. The original proposal called for using a native Indian title. But there were issues with this. First, Georg IV’s title had to be above all existing Indian princes, even those that were not in his realm. Many of the titles that fell into either translated to emperor (a title that Georg IV had no claim to), or when translated into English contained the phrase “king of kings.” Any title that contained “king of kings” was automatically disqualified due to its connotation in Christianity. In the end, using a native title was abandoned for being too much trouble. And high king was chosen to reference back to Britain’s history, and because it literally meant highest king.

New Titles for Indiana [72]​

India had a well-established nobility system. Amerindians did have European nobility like system created for them by the British back in 1784 CE. But this was little more than the British coming up with names for their own use. Now that the residential ministers were forming what they saw as proper states a new system was devised. In truth it may be possible that whoever created this new system was unaware of the old one or just chose to ignore it entirely. None of these titles were truly hereditary, but they were referred to as nobility.

With a few exceptions, if an Amerindian state had a native word that was a cognate to the standard title, it would use it. If it did not have a native language cognate then took the standard as a loanword or calque. Most of these titles were words that had already been taken from Algonquin languages and incorporated into English before integrated back into Amerindian vocabulary.
  • Great Patriarch [†] was the ruling title. It was held in union with the King of Britain.
  • Patriarch [†] was a theoretical title. It would have been the tile of any Amerindian who ruled a confederated state. Though it if the position was ever used it would have been translated into an Amerindian language.
  • Great Sachem [‡] [§] was usually given to princes who had other sachems or sagamores under them, or sachems who had significantly more prestige.
  • Sachem [§] was given to princes who had territories that had multiple subdivision, or whose native word was already particularly close to the word sachem.
  • Sagamore was given to a prince whose territory was too small for any subdivisions, or whose native word was already close to the word sagamore.
Not all of the titles created were for heads of state. Others were:
  • Sagamasquaw was the title given to clan mothers. The title was seldom used in a day-to-day compacity. That was left to whatever the original Amerindian term was. However, this was used in all official capacities. There was never a male version. Instead, a clan mother’s husband was referred to as a “consort” or the local Amerindian language equivalent. Rarely, it would be translated as matrician in European languages.
  • Mugwump was similar to esquire in New Albion. It was given to important officials who did not serve as a head of state. It would sometimes be translated as “magnate” in European languages.
  • Pniese was given to members of Amerindian warrior societies. It was used similar to the European title of knight. Though they would not be seen as prestigious.

Indian Heraldry​

One of the traditions that the British desired to bring to the tradition of heraldry. They had already fostered the creation of Amerindian heraldry by combining Amerindian and European traditions. They did the same in India. To create this new tradition, the British took the Maratha clan devaks (totems) and expanded them to function as blazons for heraldry. Persons that were not part of the Maratha clans adopted similar totems to be used as blazons, but they did not always carry the same cultural meaning. Like Amerindian heraldry, Indian heraldry mostly had blazons were proper tincture, and the shield was usually round. Two arms were allowed to share the same blazon, they just differed in the field tincture.

British India​

Bꞃıꞇıꞅh Inꝺıa [‖]
British India (eng)
1686074077843.png

Flag of British India [¶] [cx, xcvii], Emblem of British India [#] [xcviii], and Location of British India (Rose) [cviii]
Motto:
“Mıꝺ Ᵹoꝺeꞅ ᵹıeꝼe, cynınᵹ” (ang)
(By the grace of God, king)​
Anthem:"God Save the King"
Capital:Calcutta
Official languages:English & many native languages
Official religion:Unitarian Universalis
Common religions:Many native religions
Demonym:British Indian
Government:
• High King​
• Governor-General​
Princely States
Georg IV
Duke of Wellington [73]
Legislature:Indian Legislative council
Formed:from the Indian Commonwealth
Currency:British Indian rupee (₹)

British Indiana​

Bꞃıꞇıꞅh Inꝺıana [‖]
British Indiana (ang)
1686074537614.png

Flag of British Indiana [¶] [cx, xcvii], Emblem of British Indiana [#] [xcvii], and Location of British Indiana (Rose) [cviii]
Motto:“Mıꝺ Ᵹoꝺeꞅ ᵹıeꝼe, cynınᵹ” (ang)
(By the grace of God, king)​
Anthem:"God Save the King"
Capital:Frankfort
Official languagesEnglish & many native languages
Official religionUnitarian Universalis
Common religionsMany native religions
Demonym:British Indianan
Government:
• Great Patriarch​
• Governor-General​
Princely states
Georg IV
Sir John Johnson
Legislature:Indianan Legislative Council
Formed:from the Indianan Commonwealth
Currency:British Indianan wampum (¤)

Footnotes​

* ang: By the grace of God, King.​
† There are a handful of written sources, most of which that are French, that do translate patriarch to “onontio,” which was then used as a loanword.​
‡ A few Amerindian states were allowed to keep their native title (i.e., Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Iroquois & Seminole), they did borrow the great sachem as generic word though.​
§ Many times, these titles were actually compounds (i.e., war sachem, peace sachem).​
‖ And many local language translations.​
¶ Unofficial, almost certainly apocryphal flag.​
# There was no official symbol for these dominions as a whole. Each provinces & princely state had its own arms & flag, as a result a crown emblem was often used when one was needed.​

Endnotes​

71. I use the term here only because that is what they would have been called in ATL at the time.​
72. Amerindian states would eventually adopt gun salutes as India would. Although they would have significantly less, with the salutes going 7, 5, 3, 1.​
73. Still Sir Arthur Wellesley, but in ATL rewarded for his efforts to restore the monarchy.​
xcvii. (Modified from source: Sodacan, 2010)​
xcviii (Sodacan, 2010)​
Sodacan. Imperial Crown (Heraldry). 20 July 2010. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Imperial_Crown_(Heraldry).svg. Accessed 6 June 2023.​

I did end up changing the flag for England slightly. As much as I like using the blue sea dragon to reference an Irish water monster for their flag, I could not see Britain putting that much thought into it at this time. So Ireland is just a blue wyvern/dragon now.
 
Last edited:
How strange and fascinating that both British India and Indiana are more closely tied ITTL than one might expect on the surface given that they’re halfway across the world from each other. I also don’t think slavery would be that rare in the Mid-Atlantic since Delaware and Maryland were considered slave states IOTL and with ties to the crown remaining in New Albion, slavery and the slave trade could still grow in New Jersey and New York. Nice to see this TL back regardless.
 
How strange and fascinating that both British India and Indiana are more closely tied ITTL than one might expect on the surface given that they’re halfway across the world from each other.
It's very much a case of being too far from the centralized government to handle the way that they would prefer. And why develop multiple ways to handle the same problem.
I also don’t think slavery would be that rare in the Mid-Atlantic since Delaware and Maryland were considered slave states IOTL and with ties to the crown remaining in New Albion, slavery and the slave trade could still grow in New Jersey and New York. Nice to see this TL back regardless.
My comment about slavery in the mid states is a little bit of me knowing the future seeping in on accident. Slavery will diminish in the mid states at attitudes evolve. But this doesn't effect the south much at all.

As an Indian, I dont belive that the British would put so much of thought in to naming and desiging the symbol of the currency of a colony.
From what I looked up (mostly Wikipedia I admit) the name is contemporary for British use.

The symbol is absolutely not contemporary being a mid 1900s design, I believe.
But a hate just reusing generic letters for currency symbols so I used the anachronism intentionally because I wanted to. (Not the exactly the best reason but it's the one I have.)
 
My comment about slavery in the mid states is a little bit of me knowing the future seeping in on accident. Slavery will diminish in the mid states at attitudes evolve. But this doesn't effect the south much at all.
Prior to the Civil War IOTL, Delaware and especially Maryland were considered part of the South. They both voted for the Southern Democratic Party in the 1860 presidential election and martial law had to be placed onto Maryland to prevent them from seceding. The chief Justice of the Supreme Court that decided the Dred vs Scott case was a slaveholder (I think) from Maryland as well. So yeah I would imagine their attitudes would fall more in line with North Carolina and Virginia (which almost approved gradual emancipation in the early 1830s following Nat Turner’s Rebellion). I can understand there being a stark difference in attitudes between DE/MD and GA/SC, but I don’t think DE/MD would be too far apart from the Upper Southern states of NC and VA on the issue of slavery.
 
Prior to the Civil War IOTL, Delaware and especially Maryland were considered part of the South. They both voted for the Southern Democratic Party in the 1860 presidential election and martial law had to be placed onto Maryland to prevent them from seceding. The chief Justice of the Supreme Court that decided the Dred vs Scott case was a slaveholder (I think) from Maryland as well. So yeah I would imagine their attitudes would fall more in line with North Carolina and Virginia (which almost approved gradual emancipation in the early 1830s following Nat Turner’s Rebellion). I can understand there being a stark difference in attitudes between DE/MD and GA/SC, but I don’t think DE/MD would be too far apart from the Upper Southern states of NC and VA on the issue of slavery.
And in ATL 1815, you are right.

What will help the mid states change in the coming years is abolitionist pressure from and Britain and Britain's extremely tight regulation on the trade. External trade was made illegal at this time as a compromise, so the only legal trade going on is domestic.
 
And in ATL 1815, you are right.

What will help the mid states change in the coming years is abolitionist pressure from and Britain and Britain's extremely tight regulation on the trade. External trade was made illegal at this time as a compromise, so the only legal trade going on is domestic.
I’m not sure about Delaware and Maryland (it’s only recently that they tend to be viewed as northern) but I’m in agreement about New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. You can argue Delaware was a middle colony since it more or less belonged to Pennsylvania until the 1770s but Maryland was unambiguously southern. I can see DE and MD abolishing slavery with NC and VA in 1833-34 when the British did IOTL as long as they can negotiate a gradual emancipation.
 
Some more interlude information. The next chapter WILL! directly include New France!

Hindi Chess​

The name Hindi chess is very much a misnomer, as chess was originally an Indian game and both modern and pre-modern chess is still played in India. However, it is still the common name given to this chess variant. The origins of Hindi chess is disputed. It ranges from the claim that it is a pure European invention created for exoticism, to a combination of many regional rule variants.

Hindi chess mostly differs in that bishops are replaced with camels (a long knight, moves 1,3 instead of 1,2), pawns do not have an initial double step or en passant. Kings do not castle but instead can make an initial non-capturing knight leap. Pawns can only promote to the piece they started in front of (king's pawns promote to a queen). And the king and queen start on opposite squares. And the addition of the bare king rule.

There are a few other cosmetic differences, queens are normally called ministers, and the appearance of rooks vary from chariots to elephants.

I revised the Western Dress Code to make it simpler and easier to read. I also have two new dress codes.
Disclaimer: Just like before, these did not exist in until the 1900s, and are not necessarily reflective of how people would actually dress in ATL 2023.
Also, for the non-western two, I am not a fashion expert for any culture, and I tried to restrict myself to items that people could look up in Wikipedia so that they could see what they looked like. If I have labeled something that doesn't make too much sense giving the clothing's OTL usage, just assume butterflies, as there is still a lot of history to happen between were the timeline currently is and when these codes would be "normalized." If I somehow missed something being offensive, please let me know so I can try to change it somehow (and include why).

Western Dress Code​

Men
Day

Evening
Women
Day

Evening
MilitarySupplementary
Judicial

Religious

Academic

Wedding
FormalMorning dress bt w/ Homburg hatWhite tie bt w/ Homburg hatCoatdress/riding habit/skirt suit &
pillbox hat
Ball gown, stole, evening gloves, high-heeled shoes & tiara (if married)Parade dress w/ bicorneTraditional
by country
Traditional by denominationTraditional
by country
Bridegroom Suit (black frock coat,
light gray waistcoat, dark gray dress
pants, black dress boots, white
White Bridal gown,
evening gloves,
white high-heeled
Semi-formalLounge suit & trilby hatBlack tie & trilby hatCoatdress/riding habit/skirt suit &
pillbox hat
Demi-toilet, opera coat, Evening gloves, high-heeled shoes & fascinatorMess dress w/ bicorneTraditional
by country
Traditional by denominationTraditional
by country
InformalBusiness suit & fedoraBusiness suit & fedoraCoatdress/riding habit/skirt suit &
pillbox hat
Robe de style, shawl, high-heeled shoes & cocktail hatService dress w/ side capTraditional
by country
Traditional by denominationTraditional
by country
CasualBusiness/smart casual & cap (not baseball caps)Business/smart casual & cap (not baseball caps)Business/smart casual w/ skirt & halo hatBusiness/smart casual w/ dress & half-hatBattle dressTraditional
by country
Traditional by denominationTraditional
by country
  • Outside of the supplementary section black and white are usually avoided as main colors, except by women who have privilège du blanc (Catholic queens). And black is reserved to be used as a color for mourning.
  • Social classes also, generally, have different patterns. The upper class normally have elaborate patterns and embroidery. While the middle and lower classes only have simple patterns or solid colors.
  • There are a lot of variations within the code as pieces of national or regional costumes are often inserted.
  • Women's' hats vary in religious contexts, conforming to the traditional practice of the religious denomination.
  • All women's clothing have fully functional pockets in ATL.
  • All military dresses have an identical version with a dress skirt for women.
  • Parade dress usually resembles ATL 19th century uniforms, the rest are similar to OTL.
  • Religious denominations that currently use a business suit in OTL would use a Geneva gown without a clerical collar in ATL.
  • ATL casual does not include leisurewear. That is not considered part of the ATL dress code; it would range from a smoking suit or tea gown to OTL.
  • Workwear uniforms are found in most blue collar jobs in ATL, and usually consist of a jumpsuit or overalls for men and a romper for women.
  • In ATL, nightshirts and nightgowns are still the most popular forms of nightwear.
  • Mens dress shoes and boots often have a raised heel. The heel never reaches the exaggeration seen in some OTL high-heeled shoes. They never get higher than the heel on riding boots. ATL female high-heeled shoes are similar to OTL.
  • Hats and caps are a lot more common, but are not necessarily fully required.
An example of variations in the western code, is that suits made in the New French area don't have functional buttons, if any. Instead they are held closed by sashes, often ceinture fléchée.

Indian Dress Code​

(The presence of only one code does not imply a unified ATL India.)
Men
Hindu

Muslim
Women
Hindu

Muslim
MilitarySupplemental
Religious

Academic

Wedding
RitualFormal kurta,long dhoti,paduka & pagriFormal kurra, veshti, mojari & topiSari, lehenga, choli, paduka & dupattaShalwar kameez,
jutti
&
dupatta/burqa
Parade dress
bt w/ alkaluk
& pagri
Traditional by religion/denominationAngarkha, formal kurta,
dhoti,
Jodhpur boots,
angravastra & pagri
Angarkha, formal kurta,
formal churidar,
Jodhpur boots & shera
Traditional by
ethnicity/religion
FormalJodhpuri suit, Jodhpur boots & pagriSherwani, formal kurta, shalwar,Peshawari chappal, Mysore petaLehenga-style sari, lehenga, choli, chappal & dupattaShalwar kameez,
jutti
&
dupatta/burqa
Parade dress
bt w/ alkaluk
& pagri
Traditional by religion/denominationAngarkha, formal kurta,
dhoti, Jodhpur boots,
angravastra & pagri
Semi-FormalNehru jackat, formal kurta, churidar, Jodhpur boots & pagriShalwar suit, jutti & pagriGhagra choli, chappal & dupallaShalwar kameez,
jutti
&
dupatta/burqa
Parade dress
bt w/ alkaluk
& pagri
Traditional by religion/denominationAngarkha, formal kurta,
dhoti, Jodhpur boots,
angravastra & pagri
InformalSadri, kurta, churidar,kolhapuri chappal & pagriKurta, tamba, jutti & pagriSari, ghagra, choli, chappal & dupattaShalwar kameez,
jutti
&
dupatta/burqa
Parade dress
bt w/ alkaluk
& pagri
Traditional by religion/denominationAngarkha, formal kurta,
dhoti, Jodhpur boots,
angravastra & pagri
  • Most regions and ethic groups have their own variations of dress. Like the Western Dress Code, this does not included day-to-day clothes worn in or around a person's own home.
  • Other religious groups (e.g. Christians & Sikhs) tend to use the dress of the dominate religion in that state with a few possible modifications to match their own religious beliefs.
  • Like ATL Western Dress, social class generally determines how elaborately decorated the clothes are.
  • Ritual dress are normally used by Hindus any personal religious ritual. For non-Hindus it is used for their weekly religious observance.
  • While there is only one military dress there are various accoutrements for various occasions. Obviously, parade dress is not used as combat dress.
  • Vestiges of colonial anti-Islamic bias can still be seen in the supplementary dress. In Muslim dominant areas, it would not be uncommon to see certain parts substituted.

Pan-Amerindian Dress Code​

(There are some surviving Native American states in ATL, this is what they would use, but it does not include the American Southwest area.)
MenWomenMilitarySupplementary
Judicial & Academic

Religious

Wedding
FormalQuillwork wamus, ribbon shirt, leggings, quillwork moccasins, fingerweave sash & neckerchiefQuillwork shawl, ribbon shirt, ribbon skirt, quillwork moccasinsParade dress w/ roach.Buffalo robe & moccasinsTraditional by denominationQuillwork matchcoat,
ribbon shirt,
leggings, quillwork moccasins,
fingerweave sash & neckerchief
Traditional by culture w/ religious influences
Semi-formalWamus, ribbon shirt, leggings, moccasins fingerweave sash & neckerchiefShawl, ribbon shirt, ribbon skirt & moccasinsMess dress w/ roach.Buffalo robe & moccasinsTraditional by denomination
InformalRibbon shirt, leggings & moccasinsRibbon shirt, ribbon skirt & moccasinsService dressBuffalo robe & moccasinsTraditional by denomination
CasualRibbon shirt, leggings & moccasinsPatio dress & moccasinsBattle dressBuffalo robe & moccasinsTraditional by denomination
  • Most regions and ethnic groups have their own variations of dress. Like the Western Dress Code, this does not included day-to-day clothes worn in or around a person's own home.
  • While animal products and faux animal products are popular they are not seen as required. Even the quillwork can be subsituted for beads.
  • Headwear is not that common.
  • The Pan-amerindian code is an obvious descendant of the western code.
 
Last edited:
Working on the next chapter, I have just passed 50,000 words! Between that and all the images there is a very noticeable lag in my Word document while I type.
Despite the great annoyance, I'm going to take this as a good thing 🥳
 
IX-4: French Power Returns to the New World

Chapter 4: French Power Returns to the New World​

—AD 1816—
“All were rejoiced at the homecoming of the French Crown.”
Children of the Plains of Abraham
Emblem French Princely States AD 1816.png

Emblem used by French India and French Indiana [xcix]​

When the people of New France heard the terms of Congress of Hamburg, there was celebration everywhere. Needless to say, the commonwealth’s occupation was not popular with anyone. But after the common enemy was gone, obvious cracks began to form. Many felt that France had abandoned them and that they were better off on their own. This was not helped by the fact that there was no actual plan for a restored French government. A single intendant, Jospeh Bruë, was appointed for all Greater New France (which was more than just the formerly occupied territory). He was completely unprepared for the position, thought anyone would have been given the circumstances. In theory, the local administration resorted back to the seigneuries. Unfortunately, so many records were destroyed during the occupation that there was no picture of who the seigneurs were [*]. Even though seigneur was never intended to be a hereditary position, preference was given to those who could prove that they were a seigneur before the occupation or the direct descendant of a seigneur. This left many seigneuries without a seigneur. To solve this issue new seigneurs were not appointed, instead the seigneuries were given to approved seigneurs on top of their own, those that this happened to were nicknamed grand seigneur. This caused all sorts of issues, not just corruption. Seigneurs had services they had to provide to their seigneury to maintain their position. And since grand seigneurs had multiple, which were often not adjacent to each other, they had trouble for filling their end of the bargain. Their solution was to appoint local, unofficial bailiffs to operate the seigneuries they were not directly administering.

While there was no political plan, soon after its return an economic plan for New France was created. The fur trade was still the primary resource for France. The beaver population in the area had been severely reduced since the colonies founding, but there was still enough to keep the industry alive. Lumber was second. And while the French Navy was still second fiddle to the army, a large ship construction project began in Port of Québec. The goal was to build enough ships to keep New France from being an easy target. 72-guns was the largest warship built; most were smaller. With several ministers traveling back and forth between New France and France, an new resource was discovered. Maple syrup was designated as a new resource to exploit. Maple products [†] were never intended to replace cane sugar production. Instead, Paris planed on marketing it as a cheaper alternative to cane sugar for the lower classes in an attempt to undercut part of the more successful British market. Maple tree plantations were laid out, and labor was easy to find. Rather than importing slaves, the local habitants would harvest for little pay. The maple harvest normally happens during March, so there were not many other ways for the habitants [‡] to make money during that time. Maple products did become popular, but the limited harvesting season prevented it from becoming the large success Paris was hoping for.

New France would regain its former militarism. Gen. de Léry would be ennobled as viscount and given the position of Governor General. He would reform and expand the Governor General’s Guard, as well as expand their role to operate as an elite carabiner regiment. Non-French speakers were required to join the militias (while one could have joined before if they proved and understanding of French, they were not required to do so), and Amerindians who lived withing New France could earn equal societal treatment though militia service. Construction on the Lotbinière Line would also begin. The Lotbinière Line was a series of forts with outposts that were placed along New France’s southern and western borders. The forts were placed along main travel routes while the outposts connected the in between and were placed about a day’s journey away from each other. Regular soldiers would man the forts and the militias took care of the outposts. The line’s purpose was to slow down any future attacks, provide a warning system, and serve as future supply depots in the event of another invasion.
§​
Despite all of the trouble Louis XVII sent trying to get Acadia back, he did not have any plans for it. Unsurprisingly, no one in Paris wanted to legitimize the king’s obsession. Not only was there no one willing to invest in Acadia, but there was also very little to invest in. Most of the areas few British subjects left. And the Acadians still had not recovered from the expulsion. The main resource was lumber, but that was not in short supply. It provided more coastline for the cod fishing, but British territories lay in between the coast and the main fishing waters.

Acadia was under the direct control of the New French intendant. It is highly likely that this, as well as only having one intendant for all Greater New France was supposed to only be a temporary arrangement. And that this situation occurred only to prevent vacant positions before France formally consolidated its reacquisitions.
§​
Louisiana was the last piece of Greater New France. Louisiana no longer contained all of the Louisiana Territory, instead it was just the southernmost colonized part. Life in Louisiana remained unchanged. Unfortunately, the slave market did expand as smuggling new slaves into southern New Albion proved to be a lucrative venture.
§​
The northern part of the Louisiana Territory became French Indiana. Seeing how the British created their princely state dominions, the French followed suit. There were a few changes, for one the French used the term “puissance [§]” instead of dominion. The more important difference was that the French preferred to have only a few cities under direct rule, traded off with the princely having slightly less autonomy. At the same time, France also created French India, along the same lines.
***​

19th Century Fashion Shift

Prior to, and in the beginning of the 19th Century, high fashion was determined by nobility in and around Paris. This made flamboyant colors and style the fashion to match. The problem was that both France and England had major revolutions. Revolutions in which the metropolitan nobility were more in favor for the revolution (at least the concept, not necessarily the government), and the losing side. As such, the country nobility of both countries gained more respect and influence, shifting popular fashion.​

Because of the fashion shift, more simple styles and colors moved to the forefront. High fashion was very much still noble fashion but a much less flamboyant.

French Indiana​

ℐ𝓃𝒹𝒾𝒶𝓃𝒶 𝒻𝓇𝒶𝓃𝒸𝒶𝒾𝓈ℯ

Indiana française (fra)
1687224524039.png

Flag of French Indiana [‖] [lvii], Emblem of French Indiana [xcix], and Location of French Indiana (light blue) [cviii]
Motto“Montjoie Saint Denis !” (fra)
(Montjoy Saint Denis!)​
Anthem“The Return of the French Princes to Paris”
CapitalSaint Louis
Official languagesFrench & various native languages
Official religionRoman Catholic
Common religionVarious native religions
DemonymFrench Indiana
Government
• Grand Patriarch​
Princely State
Louis XVII
Formedfrom the Louisiana & Mississippi
CurrencyFrench Indianan wampum (¤)

French India​

ℐ𝓃𝒹ℯ 𝒻𝓇𝒶𝓃𝒸𝒶𝒾𝓈ℯ

Inde française (fra)
State of French India 1816 AD.png

Flag of French India [‖] [lvii], Emblem of French India [xcix], and Location of French India (light blue) [cviii]
Motto“Montjoie Saint Denis !” (fra)
(Montjoy Saint Denis!)​
Anthem“The Return of the French Princes to Paris”
CapitalPondicherry
Official languagesFrench & various native languages
Official religionRoman Catholic
Common religionsVarious native religions
DemonymFrench India
Government
• Grand King​
Princely State
Louis XVII
Formedfrom the French colonial India
CurrencyFrench Indian rupee (₹)

Footnote​

* Enough caches of surviving records have since been found. But these were scattered throughout the area and often hidden and forgotten about in basements. They were not available in AD 1816.​
† Maple syrup was sometimes transported, but it was easier to transport blocks of maple sugar (made by boiling all the water out).​
‡ The commoners who worked on the seigneuries.​
§ fra: “power”​
‖ French India and French Indiana were the only places that actually used the non-variant civil ensign (a plain white field).​
xcix. (Modified from source: de Lauban & Sodacan)​
De Lauban, Louis. Drapeau du Royaume de France (1814-1830) variante 1. 22 March 2023. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Drapeau_du_Royaume_de_France_(1814-1830)_variante_1.svg. Accessed 19 June 2023​
Sodacan. Crowned Fleur de lys (Tudor Crown). 2 June 2013. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crowned_Fleur_de_lys_(Tudor_Crown).svg. Accessed 19 June 2023.​


This is the end of Part IX. It isn't much of a in TL fashion sidebar, but it is still there as promised.

Part X will go back in time to 1812!
I'm going to have to do quite a bit of research on Latin America to pull it off too.
 
Last edited:
Still not dead!

Just mad at myself because I thought of some ideas I now want to include.
This close to a possible finishing point (chapter-wise) I'm not going to rerevise anything before I finish.

I do have plans for using this idea as a base for an other project. So, I will either just add the retcons in the other project (it probably won't appear here as I have hopes for trying to get it published) or I may do a third timeline here that includes revisions before working on thst project.
 
Top