TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Petike Sky Pirate Extraordinaire

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    Some of my older works, gentlemen...

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    Based on these OTL photos.

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    Originally depicted an Aussie soldier, I suppose. The hat style would fit the CSA, though.

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    Though I probably "done goofed up" with the paratrooper. They didn't have them in the series, did they ?

    For your consideration. :p
     
  2. MFOM Member

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    In OTL it was used by several powers as a fortress defense weapon to repel infantry attacks, so it would find use in the extensive fortifications in this TL as well, at least until MGs take over that role, i could certainly see them taken out of storage to be used in the infantry support role or AA role.
     
  3. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Would be possible for the Hotchkiss revolving cannon to be used as the main weapon of an armored vehicle in place of a cannon or machine gun?
     
  4. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Find me a line drawing of one and I'll have a friend of mine scale it with some armored vehicles and we'll both find out.
     
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  5. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    How are these for the Union military?


     
  6. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    I used sections from both the Johnson rifle and Johnson LMG for some alternate Confederate small arms on the Featherston's Finest thread.
     
  7. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    The Ingram could definitely be a nice alternative to the Thompson submachine, possibly being developed following the outbreak of the war.
     
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  8. RaspingLeech Well-Known Member

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    Figure I might as well post this here, I made a small reference for my interpretation of US Army uniforms in both wars:
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    GREAT WAR ERA (M1912):
    • Standard issue headwear was a close relative the Bergmütze ski cap to replace the War of Secession-styled kepi.
    • Calf-high jackboots were adopted in the late 1880s when the Army greatly modeled itself after the German Empire. While technically standard issue throughout the Great War, lax regulations led to many soldiers wearing shorter boots, civilian footwear, or Confederate boots taken from fallen enemies.
    • Buttons were a silver color which continued well past the war's end. Field modifications often involved covering any metal surfaces with either paint or mud in order to be less conspicuous in battle.
    • Belt buckles greatly resembled their War of Secession counterpart in a silver color. Exact designs varied, with either a rounded "US" buckle or square eagle design issued. The rectangular buckle would ultimately be standardized in the 1920s.
    SECOND GREAT WAR ERA (M1939):
    • While the overall cut of the uniform remained similar to its Great War counterpart, later uniforms were shorter in length and featured a larger collar
    • All metal surfaces sported a matte gray color, although silver buttons were still commonplace throughout the war
    • Small hooks to support the equipment belt were present on the tunic, and a more modern Y-strap system was adopted.
    • Shorter utility boots were now standard-issue for comfort, although jackboots would remain standard for parade uniforms.
    • Two breast pockets were added with all four being pleated. Urgent need for uniforms meant that varying degrees of simplification were present even in uniforms from the same factory.
    Absolutely not exact or final but I wanted something that wasn't the typical "literally just the Wehrmacht" uniform.
     
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  9. MarchingThroughGeorgia Well-Known Member

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  10. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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  11. Rehngrun New Member

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    So the Entente lost the Great War. The German Tiger and Stuka didn't influence the Confederate design because these machines do not exist for the Confederates to draw inspiration from. Confederate gear and tactics during the Second World War are implied to be their world's analogue to Germany in OTL World War II. A small country relying on speed and overwhelming concentrated firepower to defeat a numerically superior enemy. The former Entente powers of France, Britain, the Confederacy, Russia and others are heavily implied to be the TL-191 fascist Axis powers. The Union and Germany are heavily implied to be TL-191's analogue to the European Allies, specifically the Union filling the role as the Soviet Union to the Confederacy's Germany, with the German Empire filling a sort of quasi-Western Allied role supported by all the nations who were drawn to the security and prosperity of the Empire following the end of the Great War, which in TL-191 ended in September of 1917. Germany never developed the Stuka because it had no need for it. Meanwhile, the Confederacy developed a tactical need for a bomber capable of delivering not inconsiderable payloads with relatively high accuracy, which it developed in the Mexican Civil War of TL-191's 1930s alongside Barrels, which it was banned by treaty from possessing. But Confederate officers serving in the Mexican Army? They aren't bound by that treaty. The Germans of TL-191 backed the Monarchists in the Spanish Civil War, and lost to the Franco-British backed Nationalists.
     
  12. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    You're right that the Stuka and the Tiger didn't influence the Confederacy but they did inspire Turtledove, their description in the books sound a lot like the German weapons so ITL-191 the Germans didn't develop them but the CSA did for similar reasons.

    I wonder what Hollywood would use to represent the CSA arsenal if they were ever to do a film on TL-191? Would they just use US armor vehicles and aircraft to represent both sides or would they convert existing vehicles to look like WWII German vehicles, build models of something completely different?
    I think Hollywood would just use US made weapons for both sides like Shermans for the Union and maybe M41 Walkers for the CSA, P51's Mustangs for the Union and maybe P40's for the CSA.
    It would be cool if a studio went and designed all new tanks and aircraft for a movie or a mini series but I doubt they would do that.
     
  13. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    [​IMG]
    Now this I could see being a Union prototype for a "Attack Rifle" during the final months of sgw.
     
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  14. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Looks like a Druganov sniper rifle. I wish they had had Nerf guns when I was a kid.:frown:
     
  15. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    They are pretty great for creating prop weapons for sci-fi settings...
     
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  16. Soundwave3591 Active Member

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    Sep 25, 2019
    [​IMG]
    as with my contribution in the "Featherston's Finest" forum, I've drawn up my take on some of the vehicle operated by the Yankees in TL-191.

    the General consensus from what i've gathered is that the US Barrels are based on the T-34, but instead of outright copying that design i went more for a "what might have been" had Walter Christie's design (that led to the Soviet BT-series, which in turn led to the T-34) been bought by the US Military. cross-breeding it with the M-18 Hellcat gave me the Mark III Barrel.

    the CCKW uses some German inspiration, which fits the allied mentality of US equipment using German inspiration.

    as for the Wright-27, I've stayed true to the P-40 inspiration, but again not used a direct copy.

    as for the Halftracks....eh, if it ain't broke ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2019
  17. rob2001 Well-Known Member

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    The SkyShark kind of looks like a cross between a P-40 and ME-109.
     
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  18. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Very cool. I liked your posts over at "Featherston's Finest" as well.
    I like the Sky Shark and I'd like to do something similar but with a different engine and armament, I'm thinking a 20mm in the nose and two more in each wing. That is if you don't mind me stealing your idea. :biggrin:
     
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  19. Soundwave3591 Active Member

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    Sure thing!
     
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  20. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Cool! Will try to have something up before the end of the weekend.