TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Captain Reynolds Amature Sci-fi Writer

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    Actually, I think there were two that were in the forward part of the aircraft fuselage, something that the P-40B had.
     
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  2. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Four guns in the nose, interesting.
     
  3. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Sounds like it has four guns in the nose, nice concentration of fire.
     
  4. Captain Reynolds Amature Sci-fi Writer

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    I don't know if you would be able to fit four machine guns in the forward section of hte aircraft, unless they were the .30 calibre variant, but those would be relatively light and take far more hits to down an aircraft.
     
  5. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    So it occurred to me after playing some Bioshock Infinite that police uniforms from the game actually wouldn't look that to far off from the uniforms of the Timeline-191 military police, especially during the ww1 period. Just replace the hat with an American styled Stetson hat and add on a German Feldgendarmerie styled neck chain.
     
  6. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Well its a nice shade of green too and the cut of the tunic with a high neck collar looks like the kind of sharp and regimented uniform the US Army would want to have their soldiers wear.
     
  7. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    It would certainly fit with the German aesthetics that the Union adopted in timeline 191, especially for the military police. Who would mostly be in charge of maintaining order in occupied territories instead of directly fighting on the front.
     
  8. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    You said they would even wear feldgendarmerie?
     
  9. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Yeah. Admittedly the chains would help distinguish them from regular soldiers at any rate.
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  10. GDIS Pathe Well-Known Member

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    Definitely seems to be P-40 early models of the Warhawk had two 50 cals in the nose plus two 30s in the Wing

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    Later model note the two guns per wing but yeah Wright-27 just seems to be a copy pasted P40
     
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  11. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Hotchkiss Revolving Cannon and M1914 Hotchkiss Machine Gun

    And now for something a little different. After briefly reading up on Benjamin B. Hotchkiss very briefly, it completely surprised me that this guy developed a "revolving canon" - basically a Gatling Gun, but instead of shooting bullets you're shooting shells from either set of five 37mm, 47mm, or 57mm barrels. The man in our timeline was born in Connecticut and employed by the US Army during the Civil War to produce rifles. After the Civil War he moved to France to set up a munitions factory there since the US government no longer needed him making guns. In France the company he founded was called Hotchkiss et Cie and, yes, if the name is ringing a bell to you it is the same company that produced the French M1914 Hotchkiss Machine Gun of WWI. The man did not make the gun himself though he died before the time his company produced the weapon en masse.

    hotchkiss2.jpg

    Now, in this timeline I'm wondering if the guns this guy and his company made would either be butter-flied away or, if they're not, find use exclusively with the US and Central Powers. If its the latter, then may I introduce to you the Revolving Cannon!

    The gun came in several calibers, could fire shrapnel or canister shots, and was intended for use by land forces as a field gun or a fortress defense gun. Naval forces would use this gun as defense against torpedo boats that got into close range.

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    So, my question is would these guns still exist in TL-191 for their intended roles? If they do still exist, given the changes, then would it be possible these guns would find use in different countries than they historically did in our timeline? For example, if they do still exist in TL-191, I picture the revolving canon being used by US primarily, but finding use with the Central Powers if produced for export. More consequentially does that mean the Hotchkiss M1914 would no longer be a French machine gun?
     
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  12. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Hey @cortz#9 has this one been named yet? Just curious. I think we may have a few good candidates for a name.

    Leonard_Wood_1903.jpg

    - Leonard Wood - ITTL, he was the Chief of the General Staff of the US Army during the Great War against the Confederates. Its was under his leadership that the US Army was able to claim victory in the war for the first time against the Confederacy. He was also a good friend to President Theodore Roosevelt.

    OTL he actually existed, winning the Medal of Honor during the Indian Wars in the Geronimo Campaign and assisted in commanding the Rough Riders along side Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish American War.

    We can also still name a tank after Generla John J. Pershing too! He was actually still a fairly successful general in TL-191, commanding troops in the Great War on the Union side in Tennessee and Kentucky.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019
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  13. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    @cortz#9 - Actually, here's a proper list of names for any AFVs you might make for the US Army, especially tanks!

    Leonard_Wood_1903.jpg

    ^^^ --- Leonard Wood - US General Chief of Staff. Was in charge of the US Army during the Great War and helped ensure the US's first victory over the Confederacy. Wood's ability to accept and implement new military ideas helped him rise through the ranks quickly. He was also adept in seeing such abilities in other soldiers. He was actually an early advocate of Irving Morrell during the Great War, seeing the man's potential. He was also critical in changing Army doctrine based on Custer's experience with tanks supporting infantry in coordinated offensives to break through enemy lines. He was a close friend of Theodore Roosevelt. OTL, he won the Medal of Honor during the Indian Wars in the Geronimo Campaign and helped command the Rough Riders in the Spanish American War.

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    ^^^ --- John Pershing - General in command of the U.S. 2nd Army fighting in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee. Fought very well during his campaigns throughout the states, capturing Louisville in a different maneuver than was tried in the Second Mexican War. George Custer saw him as a rival and Custer's 1st Army fought along side his for the majority of the war.

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    ^^^ --- Alonzo Kent (Fictional General, not actual picture - picture above is of General Fred Funston) - Major General of the US Army during the Great War. Was responsible for clamping down and suppressing the Mormon Uprising of 1915, thus keeping the state within the union for a second time, leading to martial law over the state. General Pershing would later take his place.

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    ^^^ --- John Pope - Fought a number of successful early battles in the War of Secession from 1861-1862, was sent east, but was multiple times at the Battles of Cedar Mountain and Second Bull Run. In the Second Mexican War of 1881-1882, we was sent to Utah to put down the Mormon Uprising using shows of force and military strength to dissuade the Mormons in the territory. He was successful in putting down the uprising and preventing the state from breaking away from the Union. Was a close professional friend to George Custer during the war.
     
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  14. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    OK lets call the airborne-capable keg the "Kent" and I'll come up with some new designs for Wood, Pope and Pershing. Will probably do Pershing first, any suggestions what type of barrel it should be and when it would enter service? I'm thinking late era second great war but I'm open to suggestions.
     
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  15. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    No problem! Are you planning on still keeping the previous names of Roosevelt, Custer, Von Steuben (or Steuben), Pulaski, and Kovats?
     
  16. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Yeah all those are good.
     
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  17. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Yeah, this is also not including the "Adams" light tank you made for the Army of Quebec. So, we have Roosevelt, Custer, Steuben, Pershing, Pulaski, Kovats, Wood, Kent, and Pope.

    I'd also suggest Mahan and Reed for possible candidates, but they're not so much soldiers as they are presidents. Mahan or Reed may be more appropriate names for warships than tanks.

    I'm sure there are more potential names out there for tanks too. Though, Morrell and MacArthur I'd stress would be more appropriate as post-war tanks.
     
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  18. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    https://www.artstation.com/artwork/XmAv0
    So found this over on artstation and I immediately thought of it being a very early interwar vehicle meant to clear mine fields and transport troops against heavily fortified positions.
     
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  19. kio Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure if your aware, but this is in fact a real vehicle, and the role you described it being in is in fact the role it was assigned.
    Pretty cool :)
     
  20. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Seriously!?:extremelyhappy: I thought it was just something from some tabletop game or dieselpunk world.
     
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