TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

Admiral Scheer.png

Admiral Scheer class Heavy Cruiser (1929)

Specifications (following 1935 refit)
Weight: 13,920 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 3 x Blohm und Voss steam turbines
Range: 9,000 nautical miles
Speed: 32 knots
Aviation Capacity: 2 Heinkel He 60 Floatplanes, 1 catapult
Armor:
  • Belt: 80mm
  • Main Deck: 45mm
  • Turrets: 105mm
Armament:
  • 8 x 8 in guns (4x2)
  • 8 x 150mm guns
  • 6 x 88mm AA guns (3x2)
  • 8 x 20mm AA guns
  • 6 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2x3)
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
SMS Admiral ScheerKaiserliche-Werft KielJuly 6th, 1925May 20th, 1927April 1st, 1929Sunk by British warships in the Indian Ocean, December 1941.
SMS Admiral HipperBlohm & Voss, HamburgJanuary 2nd, 1926March 8th, 1928July 11th, 1930Sunk by British warships in the Indian Ocean, July 1942.
SMS GoebenFriedrich Krupp Germaniawerft, KielDecember 3rd, 1925February 27th, 1928April 16th, 1930Sunk by Japanese warships during the Battle of Bismarck Sea, July 1941
SMS Prinz AdalbertKaiserliche-Werft KielAugust 17th, 1925July 4th, 1927September 11th, 1929April 1945Broken up in Konigsberg, 1947.
SMS ClausewitzFriedrich Krupp Germaniawerft, KielFebruary 10th, 1927May 1st, 1929November 4th, 1931April 1945Broken up in Konigsberg, 1947

Roon class Cruiser.gif

Roon class Heavy Cruiser (1936)

Specifications (as originally completed)
Weight: 15,660 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 3 x Blohm und Voss steam turbines
Range: 6,800 nautical miles
Speed: 32 knots
Aviation Capacity: 3 Heinkel He 60 Floatplanes, 1 catapult
Armor:
  • Belt: 80mm
  • Main Deck: 50mm
  • Turrets: 105mm
Armament:
  • 8 x 8 in guns (4x2)
  • 12 x 105mm AA guns (6x2)
  • 12 x 37mm AA guns (6x2)
  • 8 x 20mm AA guns
  • 12 x 533mm torpedo tubes (4x3)
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
SMS RoonFriedrich Krupp Germaniawerft, KielNovember 7th, 1932October 2nd, 1934December 7th, 1936Sunk by British Warships in the North Atlantic, February 1943.
SMS YorckKaiserliche Werft, WilhelmshavenJanuary 14th, 1933March 9th, 1935June 1st, 1937July 19th, 1963Broken up in Troon, 1969.
SMS LützowBlohm & Voss, HamburgJuly 16th, 1934September 23rd, 1936August 28th, 1938Sunk during the Battle of the North Sea, September 1942.
SMS Prinz FriedrichKaiserliche Werft, WilhelmshavenMarch 2nd, 1933April 30th, 1935August 9th, 1937May 16th, 1961Broken up in Blyth, 1967.
SMS BlücherBlohm & Voss, HamburgSeptember 19th, 1934November 8th, 1936January 1st, 1939Sunk during the Battle of the North Sea, September 1942.

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Scharnhorst class Heavy Cruiser (1939)

Specifications (as originally completed)
Weight: 17,400 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 3 x Blohm und Voss steam turbines
Range: 6,800 nautical miles
Speed: 32 knots
Aviation Capacity: 3 Arado Ar 196 floatplanes, 1 catapult
Armor:
  • Belt: 120mm
  • Main Deck: 65mm
  • Turrets: 110mm
Armament:
  • 10 x 8 in guns (2x2) and (2x3)
  • 16 x 105mm AA guns (8x2)
  • 12 x 37mm AA guns (6x2)
  • 8 x 20mm AA guns
  • 12 x 533mm torpedo tubes (4x3)
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
SMS ScharnhorstFriedrich Krupp Germaniawerft, KielJuly 3rd, 1935May 24th, 1937August 29th, 1939Sunk during the Battle of the North Sea, September 1942.
SMS GneisenauBlohm & Voss, HamburgJune 4th, 1936April 22nd, 1937April 22nd, 1939April 9th, 1964Broken up in Cherbourg, 1970.
SMS Admiral ReuterAG Weser, BremenApril 23rd, 1936August 22nd, 1938September 1st, 1940Sunk by British Aircraft near Stavanger, November 1942.
SMS Kronprinz WilhelmAG Vulcan, HamburgFebruary 12th, 1937April 2nd, 1939March 12th, 1941April 10th, 1964Preserved as a Museum Ship in Wilhelmshaven, 1969.
SMS Admiral TirpitzKaiserliche Werft, WilhelmshavenDecember 29th, 1936January 19th, 1939January 4th, 1941December 11th, 1962Sunk in testing in the Baltic, 1971.
 
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PZL. P. 62-1.png

A PZL. P. 62A Orzeł belonging to the 510th Pursuit Squadron of the Polish Air Force based in Lublin on the outbreak of war, circa June of 1941. The P. 62 was a late 1930s development of the PZL P. 26, which was a sports plane that was introduced earlier in the 1930s, this model being made for the interceptor role. The plane was equipped with the venerable Daimler-Benz DB-601 engine, achieving a speed of 400 mph with a range of 500 miles, and came armed with six 7.92mm PWU wz. 36 machine-guns mounted in the wings and some variants carried a 20mm MG FF cannon in the nose through the propeller hub. A total of 298 airframes would be produced, all of which would serve the Polish Air Force as well as the intended customers of Romania, Sweden, and White Ruthenia, neither of them received any of their ordered planes before the outbreak of the Second Great War. The plane would serve with the Polish Air Force throughout the conflict until being withdrawn to 2nd line duties in early 1943.


PZL. P. 66.png

A PZL P. 66 Sowa of the 315th Fighter Squadron during the Autumn Counter Offensive of 1941 in Eastern Poland. The P. 66 was a licensed copy of the Heinkel He-112 only for export rather than supplying the Polish Air Force. PZL would manufacture the plane for the nations of Romania, Bulgaria, Morocco, and the Monarchist Faction in Spain, as well a batch of 28 airframes that were built for the Netherlands, however the Dutch Air Force would cancel the contract at the minute, thus leaving the planes packed in crates in Poland untouched until 1941 when war broke out. The 28 planes would quickly be requisitioned by the Polish Air Force and assigned to the 315th Fighter Squadron piecemeal. During the type's short frontline service from July to December of 1941, it would be credited with the destruction of 16 Russian aircraft as well as being the mount for the first Polish ace, Aleksander Gabszewicz. 9 planes would also be lost during this time, 7 to enemy action and 2 to mechanical problems. After December, the type would be withdrawn to use as advanced fighter trainers until ultimately being destroyed by ground crews at Deblin in the summer of 1942 to prevent them to falling into the hands of the Russians.

PZL. P. 74-1.png

A PZL P. 74 Sokół of the 303rd Fighter Squadron during the Second Battle of Minsk, circa May of 1943. The P. 74 was a wartime refinement of the P. 62 Orzeł, being re-equipped with the Daimler-Benz DB-605 engine and armed with four 13mm MG-131 machine guns (two in the nose and in the wings respectively) and a single nose mounted 20mm MG-151/20 through the propeller hub. The engine boosted the aircraft's performance, giving it a max speed of 470 mph and a range of 550 miles. The P. 74 would first roll off of PZL's production line in February of 1943 and would replace the earlier P. 50, P. 53, and P. 62 models from service. From it's production from 1943 to 1944, a total of 344 airframes would be manufactured, and after the end of the war, would be sold in small number to Romania, White Ruthenia, and Sweden as well as serving on with the Polish Air Force until 1951.
 
10TP.png

10TP Fast Keg.
The 10TP was an indigenous barrel design from Poland which had incorporated the Christie Suspension that was famously used on the Union Custer series, which gave good mobility and cross country performance. It a maximum protection of 20mm and was armed with a 37mm Bofors wz. 36 main gun and two 7.92mm CKM wz. 30 machine-guns. The vehicle would see heavy use during the first years of the Second Great War, were it proved to a match for many Russian barrels and armored vehicles before being redelegated to the recon and barrel-hunting roles later in the war. A total of 158 vehicles would be produced.
MP 10TP.png

A Barrel-Hunting variant of the 10TP with it's turret replaced with a German made Pak-40 anti-barrel gun, in which these were usually assigned to Infantry Divisions.

14TP.png

An improvement over the 10TP, the 14TP also used the Christie suspension, and it would also have improved armor, being upped to 50mm of protection, and the armament featuring the standard 37mm wz. 36, but later versions would have a 47mm wz. 39 anti-barrel gun, it's anti-infantry weapons were to be two CKM wz. 40 heavy machine-guns. During the Second Great War, the 14TP served as Poland's main barrel until early 1943, when they were supplanted by the German built and supplied Panzer IIIs and IVs and Sturmgeschutz Assault Guns as well as newer Polish designed barrels. After that, the 14TP would either be used as recon barrels or a batch of 28 14TPs would be armed with 50mm guns to serve in a Barrel-Hunter role. A grand total 196 vehicles would be produced from 1940 to 1942, with another 201 hulls being produced as barrel-hunters.
14TP 50mm.png

A modified 14TP with a 50mm Kwk 39 main-gun that was used on the Panzer III.
 
DH98 FB.png

A de Havilland Mosquito Mk IV manned by the No. 455th Strike Squadron of the Royal New Zealand Air Force based near Eindhoven in the Netherlands, circa Spring of 1943.

The de Havilland DH. 98 Mosquito was introduced in November 1941, in which it was designed as a fast bomber by the British with the use of wood instead of metal. This would make the Mosquito before the introduction of the German and American turbo fighters, the fastest operation aircraft of the Second Great War. As the war evolved, the versatility of the aircraft would too increase, serving in roles such in the night fighter, pathfinding, strike, fighter-bomber, and photo-reconnaissance. The plane had a range of 1,300 miles with a top speed of 415 mph, this model in particular can carry either up to 1,000 pounds of bombs or have 8 RP-3 rockets, which could be used against ground or naval targets. Operators of the Mosquito beside the RAF were the Air Forces of Australia, New Zealand, Russia, France, the Free Belgian Air Corps*, South Africa, Argentina, and even the Confederate Air Force would use a few aircraft supplied from the British. A total of 6,900 airframes would be produced from 1940 to 1944, with it's last operator, the RAF, retiring the type in 1965.

* = A contingent of Belgian pilots flying in the RAF.
 

Pangur

Donor
View attachment 648112
A de Havilland Mosquito Mk IV manned by the No. 455th Strike Squadron of the Royal New Zealand Air Force based near Eindhoven in the Netherlands, circa Spring of 1943.

The de Havilland DH. 98 Mosquito was introduced in November 1941, in which it was designed as a fast bomber by the British with the use of wood instead of metal. This would make the Mosquito before the introduction of the German and American turbo fighters, the fastest operation aircraft of the Second Great War. As the war evolved, the versatility of the aircraft would too increase, serving in roles such in the night fighter, pathfinding, strike, fighter-bomber, and photo-reconnaissance. The plane had a range of 1,300 miles with a top speed of 415 mph, this model in particular can carry either up to 1,000 pounds of bombs or have 8 RP-3 rockets, which could be used against ground or naval targets. Operators of the Mosquito beside the RAF were the Air Forces of Australia, New Zealand, Russia, France, the Free Belgian Air Corps*, South Africa, Argentina, and even the Confederate Air Force would use a few aircraft supplied from the British. A total of 6,900 airframes would be produced from 1940 to 1944, with it's last operator, the RAF, retiring the type in 1965.

* = A contingent of Belgian pilots flying in the RAF.
i`m curious, the RAF retiring the Mosquito in 1965 implies that the UK was left keep/have not just an Air force but equip it with domestic produced a/c after loosing the war. Odd me thinks
 
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