TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

Similarly when it comes time for a Quebecois airforce at least at first I figure they'd be given captured Canadian/British gear. When that starts falling apart and spares dry up then they'd get surplus US FGW aircraft.
Assuming they exist ATL, local companies like Bombardier might end up producing some land vehicles and airplanes, either just repros licenced from US or German companies or new vehicles of their own.
 
Assuming they exist ATL, local companies like Bombardier might end up producing some land vehicles and airplanes, either just repros licenced from US or German companies or new vehicles of their own.
Yeah for the FGW I figure the Canadians would have produced a fair amount of their own gear but mostly would be licensed production of Ango/French designs. After the war started they would have had to be almost completely dependent on domestically made equipment with access to Europe cut off. Their industrial situation would have deteriorated fairly rapidly with the rapid cutting of the Trans Canadian railways meaning the loss off pretty much all of the resources of Western and Pacific Canada. After the collapse of the Canadian Government I could see the remaining industry not located in Quebec being nationalized by the US and either set to producing kit for the US war against the CSA or disassembled and moved to the US.

I feel like US would have filtered a lot of the captured Canadian gear to the Quebeckers or to the Black Socialist revolt attempts. Others would have been used to arm the second line US formations holding the Canadians down during the war. Later on a fair bit could end up in the hands of the Irish rebellion.

I also feel like the US might have kept the disarmed former Canadian POW's as forced labor for at least a few years post war. I think they'd be very leery about freeing millions of trained former soldiers to go home to a Country that was no longer their own.
 
There is a few aircraft liveries that I was meaning to post for a while.
ilyushin-il-4.png

An Imperial Russian Air Force Ilyushin Il-4 of the 58th Bombardment Division, Baltic Front, circa June of 1943. The Il-4 was the Russian Empire's standard medium bomber of the Second Great War.
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An Avia B. 135 F-1 from the 102nd Bosnian Fighter Squadron operating in the Ukraine, circa July of 1943. The F-1 to the G-3 variants (most of the aircraft were produced as advanced trainers) of the renowned Avia B. 135 mounted a Daimler Benz DB601 engine and had 2 20mm cannons in the wings, one in the nose, and two 13mm MG-131 machine-guns in the nose.
Fokker G. 110.png

A Fokker G. 110E-2 Heavy Fighter of the Royal Danish Air Force, circa late 1942. The G. 110 was the standard heavy fighter for the German Luftwaffe for the first half of the SGW, which was designed by Willy Messerschmitt of the Fokker Company. The aircraft would perform in the roles of heavy fighter, ground attack, night fighter, and the recon roles, in which it did best as a night fighter.
 
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Shown here is a Curtiss P-27G of the 382nd Free Irish Fighter Squadron (aka the Free Irish Air Corps) on the Greenland Front, circa October of 1942. The 382nd Squadron would be first formed in November of 1941 at Westover Field, which this unit would be made entirely of either Irish immigrants or Irish expats as well Irish-Americans. The squadron's first fighters that they would use would the venerable but obsolete Curtiss P-24 Hawk single engine fighter, in which they would first stationed in Buffalo, New York to protect the local war industries there from potential Confederate Air Force bombing raids. From November 1941 to July of 1942, the squadron in their dated monoplanes would shoot down 4 Falcon medium bombers, 3 Razorbacks, 2 heavy fighter escorts, and 2 Hound-Dogs while defending the Buffalo area. In July of 1942, the unit was pulled back to Westover Field where they would be one of the first squadrons to be equipped with the new P-27G model and they would get new orders, in which they were to be transferred to Greenland to deal with the RAF and FAA in the region. To the Irish in the 382nd, this was music to their ears as they were very eager to take the fight to the British. During their time in Greenland from July 1942 until August of 1943, the 382nd was able shoot down a total of 3 fighters, 3 bombers, 2 recon planes, and even 2 Short Sunderland (aka the Flying Porcupine) maritime patrol aircraft, and 6 Avro Anson patrol planes. Afterwards, the 382nd would be transferred over to the Missouri-Arkansas Front where they fought the rest of the war at, racking a total of 7 Confederate Hound-Dogs, 2 Falcon bombers, 3 transport planes, 4 Raccoon Light Bombers, 2 Mule Dive Bombers, and 13 various other aircraft including a single A44 Raptor fighter. By war's end, the unit would score a total of 58 air victories and 22 probable's, and had by then had upgraded to the P-46A2 Super Shark fighters, in which after the war, many of the men of the 382nd and their planes would be transferred over to the newly reestablished Irish Air Corps, in which the P-46's would remain in the service in Ireland until they were replaced by the German Fw-190 fighters in 1949.
 

Pangur

Donor
View attachment 588092
Shown here is a Curtiss P-27G of the 382nd Free Irish Fighter Squadron (aka the Free Irish Air Corps) on the Greenland Front, circa October of 1942. The 382nd Squadron would be first formed in November of 1941 at Westover Field, which this unit would be made entirely of either Irish immigrants or Irish expats as well Irish-Americans. The squadron's first fighters that they would use would the venerable but obsolete Curtiss P-24 Hawk single engine fighter, in which they would first stationed in Buffalo, New York to protect the local war industries there from potential Confederate Air Force bombing raids. From November 1941 to July of 1942, the squadron in their dated monoplanes would shoot down 4 Falcon medium bombers, 3 Razorbacks, 2 heavy fighter escorts, and 2 Hound-Dogs while defending the Buffalo area. In July of 1942, the unit was pulled back to Westover Field where they would be one of the first squadrons to be equipped with the new P-27G model and they would get new orders, in which they were to be transferred to Greenland to deal with the RAF and FAA in the region. To the Irish in the 382nd, this was music to their ears as they were very eager to take the fight to the British. During their time in Greenland from July 1942 until August of 1943, the 382nd was able shoot down a total of 3 fighters, 3 bombers, 2 recon planes, and even 2 Short Sunderland (aka the Flying Porcupine) maritime patrol aircraft, and 6 Avro Anson patrol planes. Afterwards, the 382nd would be transferred over to the Missouri-Arkansas Front where they fought the rest of the war at, racking a total of 7 Confederate Hound-Dogs, 2 Falcon bombers, 3 transport planes, 4 Raccoon Light Bombers, 2 Mule Dive Bombers, and 13 various other aircraft including a single A44 Raptor fighter. By war's end, the unit would score a total of 58 air victories and 22 probable's, and had by then had upgraded to the P-46A2 Super Shark fighters, in which after the war, many of the men of the 382nd and their planes would be transferred over to the newly reestablished Irish Air Corps, in which the P-46's would remain in the service in Ireland until they were replaced by the German Fw-190 fighters in 1949.
Yeah!!!! Thank you S. Marlowski
 
I'm wondering what the odds are that pre FGW the US government/ military has built up ties with covert Irish rebels/ revolutionaries. Their was in OTL a lot of public support from Irish Americans for Irish independence and a lot of Irish would be rebels fled to the US at various points. And after the ACW US based Irish rebel groups launched a couple of raids on Canada (and somehow managed to build some of the world's first submarines). I wonder if the US covertly armed and trained groups of Irish rebels pre war and built up strategies and resources into figuring out how to smuggle guns and money into Ireland (presumably via illegal use of Neutral shipping during the war.). I wouldn't be surprised if after the Fall of Canada a lot of the captured Canadian kit (which would likely be overwhelmingly British pattern) ended up getting funneled into Ireland.

I wonder about the viability of the US building a couple of large transport submarines (like the ones the Germans built OTL to trade with the neutral US) in order to smuggle guns and advisors to Ireland.
 
There might be an "odd" link between Irish Catholics and the Irish diaspora in Quebec. Mind you, the Irish diaspora is split between Irish Catholics and Orangemen (my ancestors).

Irish Catholics remained distinct from French Catholics with separate churches and schools. As late as the 1990s, Ottawa had distinct English public schools, English private schools, Protestant private schools, French public schools, French Catholic schools plus a few Jewish, etc. As a school-bus driver, I frequently drove children past one elementary school to deliver them to a a nearby private school. &
As late as 1984, I visited an old Canadian-born, Irish-Catholic lady who angrily recounted all the sins committed against the IRA by the British Army. Lots of anger!!!!!!!
Irish are the third or fourth largest diaspora in Quebec, though they tended to be working class.

& Please note that the Canadian definition of "public school" is the opposite of British practice. Canadian "public schools" are funded by taxes and anyone can attend.

OTOH Canadian "private schools" are funded by churches - or the wealthy - and usually require parents to pay extra for their children to attend. For example Bishop's College School is a boarding school in Lennoxville, Quebec and most of the students are from the wealthier families from Montreal/English-speaking upper class.
 
SU-122.png

The SU-122 Assault Gun, which was a variant of the T-33 Medium Barrel which was equipped with a modified M30 122mm howitzer in a casemate mount. The vehicle was designed by the Russians as a mobile artillery piece in which it was to destroy enemy entrenched and fortified positions, but the SU-122 also worked effectively in an anti-barrel role. A total of 408 vehicles would be produced from September of 1942 until the end of March in 1944.
SU-85.png

The SU-85, which it also was an assault gun variant of the T-33 series like the SU-122. The vehicle in question was designed for more of the Barrel Hunting role, which it would be equipped with the D-5T 85mm gun. The first of the SU-85s would enter production in mid 1943 and would remain in production until 1945 with a total of 1,248 vehicles produced. The vehicle proved to be a good all around design, with a powerful gun which was capable of taking out all Central Powers armored vehicles at the time of introduction and had good concealability.
SU-100.png

The SU-100, was a follow-on design for the successful SU-85 self propelled gun, mounting a 100mm D-10S main gun, another improvement to the design was that it's superstructure was raised to better accommodate the new armament and it's ammunition. The vehicle would enter service with the Imperial Russian Army in early 1945 during the Siberian War against the Japanese, where it proved to be a menace against Japanese armor. However following the end of the Siberian War, production of the SU-100 would cease with a total of 86 vehicles being produced, and in Russian service would remain in use until the end of the 1960s where it got replaced by the T-55 series.
 
Type 9 Self-Loading Rifle
T-9.png

Specifications
Type: Semi-Automatic Rifle
Country of Origin: Empire of Japan
Introduction: 1949
Action: Gas operated short stroke piston, tilting bolt
Cartridge: 7.7x41mm Nambu
Feed System: Clip fed, staggered column, 10 round box magazine.
Rate of Fire: 25 rounds per minute (practical)
Effective Range: 600 meters

Following the end of the Second Great War, the major military powers of the world (namely Germany, Japan, and the United States) would realize that the bolt-action infantry rifles of old were obsolete and self-loading and select-fire infantry rifles were the way of the future. In which the three nations all took on different paths to develop and introduce the replacements for the now obsolete bolt-action rifles. For Japan, they had decided on developing a new small arms doctrine which both the semi-automatic rifles and "submachine-guns" of the future were all to use the same cartridge. For the self-loading rifle, the Japanese would adopt Kokura Arsenal's design, which would be christened the Type 9 in the newly developed 7.7x41mm Nambu cartridge. The rifle's gas system was modeled after one from the Russian Tokarev SVT-40 self-loading rifle and it's nose cap, stock, and sling attachments was modeled after that of the earlier Type 99 Arisaka rifle. The rifle would prove to be popular with Japanese troops owing to it's rather light recoil and it accuracy. The production figures for the rifle a total of 2,790,000 rifles being manufactured and they would be produced from 1949 to 1958 at the Kokura, Nagoya, Mukden, and Jinsen Arsenals as well as parts being manufactured by a plethora of subcontractors. However by the mid-1950s, the new Type 14 Assault Carbine would prove to a superior in the service role over the Type 9, and from the late 1950s, the type would be withdrawn to non-combat and 2nd roles in the Imperial Army and Navy and would serve as the primary rifle for the newly formed Imperial Japanese Air Force* (For it's ground security troops and Anti-Aircraft crews.) In that capacity, the Type 9 rifle would serve well into the late 1980s to early 1990s when they were finally declared obsolete and many being surplused off to civilian markets (mainly in the United States, the Ottoman Empire, and New Zealand, where they became popular rifles.)

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* = The Imperial Japanese Air Force would formed from the Imperial Army Air Force and elements of the Imperial Naval Air Service in 1954.
 
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A Ki-154-I Otsu of the 18th Sentai based in Java, circa 1946.
A Ki-154 Sutōmubādo (Storm Bird) - WATO designation Hap.
This fighter was the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service's first Turbo Fighter to enter operational service, this model was actually a modified Ki-100 fighter which had it's original Mitsubishi Kinsei engine replaced with a locally made copy of the Rolls-Royce Derwent jet engine. It was armed with two wing mounted 20mm cannons with two more in the nose. The plane would enter service with the IJAAS in 1945 and served in some frontline units for a time until being withdrawn to the trainer role in 1948. A total of 198 airframes (including a prototype converted from a standard Ki-100) would be manufactured during this time period.

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A Ki-162-I Ko of the 23rd Sentai based at Tachikawa Airfield near Tokyo, circa 1949.
Kawasaki Ki-162 Shusui (Sharp Sword) - WATO designation Adolph.
An improvement over the previous Ki-154 fighter, the Ki-162 was a purpose built turbo which had also incorporated a tricycle undercarriage, rear mounted airbrakes, and an ejection seat. The aircraft would go into production in 1947 and enter service with the IJAAS that same year. This plane would serve the IJAAS as a fighter well until it's replacement by the even better Ki-204 Karyu fighter in 1951, after that, the aircraft either continued in Japanese service as a fighter-bomber, photo-reconnaissance, and a even an advanced trainer version known as the Ki-163. A good number of the fighters would also be sold to many of Japan's client states and other nations such as Manchukuo, Mongolia Ethiopia, Peru, Argentina, and Afghanistan. A total of 1,624 fighters and 3,374 trainers would be manufactured between 1947 and 1955.

ki-204_karyu.png

A Ki-204 Karyū of the 11th Sentai based outside of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Far East People's Republic, circa 1953.
Nakajima Ki-204 Karyū (Fire Dragon) - WATO designation Kate
The Ki-204 would first have it's development origins in 1947 when the Imperial Army Headquarters put out a requirement for a new turbo fighter that was to implement design features such as swept wings, an onboard radar, among other features. The type would first take flight in 1949 and proved to be satisfactory and would enter service the in the autumn of 1951. The aircraft would prove to be a rather agile plane as well as great handling characteristics, which one aviation historian would dub the plane as the "Zero of the early Jet Age." A grand total of 10.461 airframes would be manufactured and would with both the IJAAS and it's successor, the Imperial Japanese Air Force after it's creation in 1954 along with a whole host of other nations. During the Frozen Conflict, the plane had proven to be a well designed fighter plane during the many proxy wars of that period.

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WATO, is an acronym for the Washington-American Treaty Organization, which is an analog for the NATO alliance my headcanon of TL-191.
 
Preview image of miniatures I made based on various art pieces posted here: infantrymen for Imperial Russia, Actionist France, Imperial Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

F0993309-F1E6-477A-92A8-95BFE069CD3D.jpeg
 
Preview image of miniatures I made based on various art pieces posted here: infantrymen for Imperial Russia, Actionist France, Imperial Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

View attachment 594272
That French soldier gives me Battlefield 1 vibes. I'm guessing the Actionists are going for shock value with their uniforms? Also, nice eagle on the Russian helmet (or whatever bird that is lol)
 
That French soldier gives me Battlefield 1 vibes. I'm guessing the Actionists are going for shock value with their uniforms? Also, nice eagle on the Russian helmet (or whatever bird that is lol)
I based it on the Vichy uniform posted earlier in this thread, with a gas mask because gas was still used in the SGW. I also have Union troops with gas masks.
 
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