TL-191: Filling the Gaps

This is what I mean though, what if the Army fights about losing the AAF, i would imagine the Chief of the General Staff and Chief of Naval Staff would be having outright fights with President Dewey over this
 
The AAF guys will be chomping at the bit to become independent, but Naval Aviation is something they wouldn't want to touch. IOTL, when the USAF became an independent force in 1947, they never mentioned taking over Naval Aviation-either carrier- or land-based (Maritime patrol/ASW, Search and Rescue, Recon, etc.).
 
But it isnt specified whether the pilots were AAF just attached to the Carrier or are directly under the Navy. They started flying Wright Fighting Scouts which implies they would be AAF. It's why I'm curious.

However I agree with your assessment. The Navy didnt play as decisive a role in GW2 since it wasnt doing insane operations like in OTL WW2, so the AAF probably wouldnt care about the Navy, considered them a poorer relation
 
It's not Chief of Naval Staff, it's Chief of Naval Operations, btw. The CNO (maybe Ernie King TTL, maybe someone else) would fight tooth and nail to keep all naval aviation, whether land-based or carrier-based, as part of the Navy.
 
It's not Chief of Naval Staff, it's Chief of Naval Operations, btw. The CNO (maybe Ernie King TTL, maybe someone else) would fight tooth and nail to keep all naval aviation, whether land-based or carrier-based, as part of the Navy.
That's the unfortunate part of TL-191 that the CNO (thanks for the correction ;) ) was never specified. The closest to a Naval leader that was mentioned was Admiral Dewey who had command of the Pacific Fleet during the capture of the Sandwich islands and a number of Rear Admirals that were mentioned running around (Rear Admiral Fiske who commanded the Dakota Task Force) and Rear Admiral Halsey who was commander of the Naval District that was going to help out MacArthur.

Ernie King would definitely be one possibility and I do agree given thought that considering how critical Carrier aircraft were in the Pacific and the Atlantic to a lesser extent (scaring off the Royal Navy Fleet that beat the High Seas Fleet in 43, he wouldn't want to give up his best offensive asset without a fight.
 
And President Dewey would make sure the CNO got his way. The Navy did its part in the war, and did it well.

Incidentally, the Riverine Navy that was almost put out of business thanks to air power during the war would stay on after. Occupation patrols in the former Confederacy, you know.
 
I happened to come across a biography of one George Roby Dempster today and began wondering: what companies were there in the South historically that might have taken part in the construction of Featherston's armies? I could see the Dempster Brothers company possibly supplying them with several types of equipment, provided they would exist in TL-191.
 
Senators, Governors, and Representatives of the United States/Confederate States



Jack London
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California's Second District
1905-1908
1911-1916​

Jack London, born and raised in the state of California, was a prominent Socialist representative during the early 20th century. Prior to being elected, London had been a professional author, one of his most famous being To Build a Fire in 1902. London found inspiration for these stories during his visits to Czarist Alaska in the late 1890s. Jack London used his exploits and fame to get elected for the first time in the 1904 house elections in his home state. In 1908, London resigned his seat to be the running mate for Socialist presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs, only to lose to the Democratic candidate once again. During his time out of office, London would write the early science fiction novel The Iron Heel, which was set in the far off future where monopolies ruled with an iron fist and crushed the working class under its firm boot. The book was both a best seller and controversial, primarily for its depiction of a President Wesley Randal Wurst (an obvious dig at his political rival William Randolph Hearst). London returned to the House after the 1912 congressional election, only for a rift to develop between him and Debs over support of the Great War. Nonetheless, London campaigned for Debs during the 1916 election, though he declined to be Debs's running mate again. London died on November 22nd, a year before the end of the Great War.
 
Senators, Governors, and Representatives of the United States/Confederate States


William Randolph Hearst
Governor of California
1911-1917​

William Randolph Hearst was the Democratic governor of the state of California during the First Great War. Born in the city of San Francisco the year after the War of Seccession, Hearst would witness British marines raiding the San Francisco mint in the Second Mexican War, which he never forgot. Once in control of his business empire, Hearst engaged in yellow journalism, depicting the British, French, Japanese, and Confederates in a less than flattering way.
Once he began entering politics by campaigning for Democratic candidates, he suddenly found a rival in Jack London. The two hated each other publicly and privately, and ran as opponents during the 1904 election. Though losing to London, Hearst would later win election to governor of California and led his state through the war years. After the end of the war, he retired from public office to return to his newspapers.
 
The ones that are mentioned in the books are Sloss Steel Foundry, which was a real-life company, Cyclone Chemicals Company (a parallelism for the company that made Zyklon B), the Confederate Citrus Company, and the C.B. Churchill Company.
Hmmm. I suppose in this world people need to go to German economic pages on North American stocks in order to see the KKK.
 
Corporations of the Confederacy: United Steel

A photo of the United Steel Mill in Jackson, Mississippi, circa 1901.

The United Steel Corporation was formed as a merger between the two smaller New Orleans Steel Works and the Hixton-Jackson Steel & Company in 1880, which was originally named the Hixton-New Orleans-Jackson Steel Corporation, but was renamed to United Steel in 1882. By 1914, United Steel had become the 3rd largest steel manufacturing firm in the Confederacy, with mills in New Orleans, Jackson, Little Rock, and Birmingham alongside with a shipyard in New Orleans and a locomotive factory in Houston. The original owners of the company were H. J. Hixton and O. L. Benlouf, who previously ran the preceding companies. Benlouf would die from a stroke in May of 1894 while Hixton ran the company until 1908 when he retired and handed over ownership to his son named Benjamin. During the First Great War, the United Steel Corporation would sell steel to other companies in support of the Confederate War Effort. It's New Orleans shipyard would manufacture several ships for the Confederate Navy which included submarines, destroyers, and the light cruisers CSS Huntsville and Cowpens. The locomotive factory would manufacture machine-guns, rifles, mortars, and field artillery pieces as well as building transport trucks for the army. After war's end, the Peace Treaty would name the United Steel Corporation as a major contributor to the Confederate War of Aggression, as a result, the company had to pay 65,000,000 Confederate Dollars to the Union as war reparations. From 1917 to 1925, United Steel struggled to stay in business as it was forced to close the locomotive factory and it's mills in Little Rock, Arkansas and Birmingham, Alabama. In 1923, fearing the company might go bankrupt, Benjamin Hixton would sell the company to a businessman named Thomas D. Cunningham. Cunningham with his management would turn the situation around and got it back on it's feet. In the late 1920s, the United Steel Corporation would work with the Confederate Armed Forces in a clandestine rearmament program behind closed doors. The company would help design and build new artillery pieces, armored vehicles, barrels, and warships. Also during this time, Cunningham would also donate sizable amounts of money to the Freedom Party and was also a member of the party. Following the rise of Jacob Featherston, the corporation grew to new heights, aside from it's closed factories being reopened, United Steel would also open new mills in Vicksburg and Shreveport, tractor factories in New Orleans, Montgomery, and Huntsville (which the real intention for these factories was the production of Barrels), and an aircraft factory in Athens, Georgia. United Steel's subsidiaries would include the Galveston Shipyard, Schofield Motor Company, Beech and Dixon Aircraft Company, T&P Motor Company, and the Vicksburg Ship Building Corporation, which would make United Steel the 2nd Largest Corporation of Featherston's Confederacy by 1938. During the Second Great War, United Steel would manufacture weapons ranging from rifles, machine-guns, artillery, aircraft, trucks, armored vehicles, barrels, aircraft, submarines, and warships for the Confederate War Effort. As very few white males were available for it's labor force, the Corporation had to use for it's labor force white women and imported Hispanic laborers. During the conflict as with other major manufacturers, the Union Air Force would bomb United Steel's factories and steel mills in an effort to bring the Confederate War Machine to a halt. By the Spring of 1944, they had mostly succeeded in this goal as United Steel's production levels fall as it's facilities lay in ruins. At the very end of the conflict, Cunningham would attempt to flee to Mexico, but was captured by the Union Army and was a defendant at the 1945 Nashville War Crimes Trial and was charged as being complicit for the Freedomite Crimes Against Humanity and for the Confederacy's War of Aggression against the Union. Cunningham was sentenced to 30 years in prison, there he would spend the remainder of his life until his death on April 9th, 1958. United Steel Corporation would be shut down by the Federal Government in early 1945 and it's factories would either be used for other purposes, abandoned, or were torn down and their materials would be used to rebuild the south.​
 
- The Tredegar Works (Small Arms)
- Birmingham Motor Company (Trucks and later barrels, likely handled combines in between wars)
- The Confederate Citrus Company (State owned front company for aircraft production)
- The Sloss Works (Steel Mills as mentioned)
- Huntington Rocket Company

There was also a mail order service I cant recall right now, have to reread or listen to the audio books again.

Beyond that not really named companies though we can make them up no problem, there was at least one major oil company in Texas and it would astound me if Anne Colleton didnt Incorporate her holdings or something at some point, as its mentioned that the Marshlands Plantation is one of the largest and most profitable plantations Pre Great War in South Carolina
 
- The Tredegar Works (Small Arms)
- Birmingham Motor Company (Trucks and later barrels, likely handled combines in between wars)
- The Confederate Citrus Company (State owned front company for aircraft production)
- The Sloss Works (Steel Mills as mentioned)
- Huntington Rocket Company

There was also a mail order service I cant recall right now, have to reread or listen to the audio books again.

Beyond that not really named companies though we can make them up no problem, there was at least one major oil company in Texas and it would astound me if Anne Colleton didnt Incorporate her holdings or something at some point, as its mentioned that the Marshlands Plantation is one of the largest and most profitable plantations Pre Great War in South Carolina
Weren't the Confederate companies that manufactured the poison and crematorium for the death camps named as well ?
 
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