TL-191: Filling the Gaps

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Craigo, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. President Mahan Well-Known Member

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    Jun 7, 2011
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    Yeah. I’ll fix it when I get home.

    Have you guys been able to load more than one image at a time? I think both the Chesapeake Campaign and Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence deserve a map.

    Allochronian I like the idea of the Zamora telegraph. How was it received in Mexico. I suspect Mexico was definitely looking for a way out of the war by late 1915. Craigo has a great Mexican article if your looking for ideas.
     
  2. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    originaltimeline
    Despite what Turtledove chose, I was more comfortable with the idea of Mexico being neutral in the First Great War.

    Anyway, the general population was probably surprised at the idea of going against one of their main allies. It was probably equally divided among those who cared; some welcomed the idea of new and stronger allies...while others didn't think that losing a close ally who probably helped them out during the early years was the best diplomatic choice.

    Among the upper-class, they were most likely for it since they did not want to be against the Hapsburgs. The Imperial government may have initially wanted to say yes to the telegram but there were four factors that prevented it from occurring:

    1) A decent military but somewhat behind the technology of the Confederates.
    2) The embarrassment of the telegram being exposed publicly and save face with the Confederacy.
    3) The uncertainty that the USA would keep their promises and might try to support a Republic in Mexico.
    4) Dealing with TWO, instead of one, hyper-aggressive nations that may, at any point, decide to go against the Empire.

    Just my opinions.

    I'm interested in that article. Where may I find it?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 9:35 PM
  3. President Mahan Well-Known Member

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    Jun 7, 2011
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    New York, New York
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
    TITUP likes this.
  4. m0585 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    All,

    I'm working on a post covering the U.S. assault on Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain (Operation Custer).

    I hope to have it out soon.
     
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  5. Allochronian Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2018
    Location:
    originaltimeline
    I've previously mentioned on the "What Went Wrong" thread related to TL-191 how erroneous the borders of Sonora, Chihuahua, and the rest of the states in Mexico were. Although plausible, I didn't like the idea that I could have presumed that the Empire could have changed its mind about dividing itself into 50 Departments in this alternate timeline as an explanation into why Sonora and Chihuahua look bigger than what they should be.

    Therefore, I decided to make a slightly more realistic map of the Second Empire of Mexico in TL-191 and compare it what other states Turtledove should have included in order to make up the Republican Border version of Sonora and Chihuahua, and with a map that shows my version of what Mexican states could have possibly made up the purchase back in 1881.

    TL-191 Map of Mexico more accurate.jpg
    The actual sizes of Sonora and Chihuahua in 1881 with Second Imperial boundaries. Notice that present-day Sonora would have been made up of three departments: Sonora, Arizona, and Alamos. Present-day Chihuahua includes the following departments: Chihuahua, Batopilas, and Huejuquilla.

    TL-191 Map of Mexico turtledove version.jpg
    The size of Sonora and Chihuahua in Turtledove's version .

    TL-191 Map of Mexico more accurate my version.jpg
    In my version, I would have liked to have seen California (Mexico), Arizona (Mexico), Sonora, and Chihuahua become the states that were part of the Confederate purchase.

    *I messed up on the borders of the Central American countries. Sorry.