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TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

Freedom Party Guard miniatures.

C2481C97-93DA-4B9A-83F3-6B12DFDEBEE7.jpeg
 
Featherston's Uniform.png

An illustration of the so-called "Military Pattern" of uniform which was worn by President Jake Featherston during his reign over the CSA. This outfit included an M1912/25 Officer's Tunic, breeches, leather riding boots, a peaked cap, and a high quality Sam Browne belt. Though Featherston would wear the tunic frequently, however he would rarely wear the whole set, in fact, he only worn this combination on four different occasions. Which was during the 1937 Invasion of Louisiana, the 1940 Armed Forces Day Review in Richmond, during his trip to occupied Ohio and the Front in 1941 following Blackbeard, and lastly during his inspection of the Rappahannock Line in the winter of 1944. Featherston would ultimately order his personal adjutant, Assault Band Leader Otis McGregor*, to destroy this uniform and his other belongings to prevent them from falling into the hands of the Union Army.
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* = Otis McGregor is a reference to the real life character named Otto Gunsche.
 
CS Soldier, 1934.png

A C.S. Army soldier from the Army of Virginia, circa 1934. During the time period between the end of the First Great War and the Rise of Featherston, the Confederate Army uniform would not change all too much from the wartime pattern. This soldier's kit includes:

M1915 "Brodie" Helmet aka "The Tin Hat"
M1907/30 Lee-Tredegar Service Rifle
M1912/20 Service Dress Uniform
M1910/21 Gaiters
M1910 Webbing
M1910/15 Boots
 
T-1.png

The T-1 or the Tractor Model 1, was the Confederacy's first post First Great War Barrel to be developed and to enter production. The T-1 was heavily inspired by British designs, notably the Vickers-Carden-Loyd Light Tank, which the Confederates would receive a lot of technical support from the British. In 1933, the T-1 would enter service with the Confederate, being designated as a tractor to help conceal it's real purpose from Union observers. The basic T-1 would be armed with a single 7.7mm Vickers heavy machine-gun, (while some variants such as the T-3 Barrel Hunter would be armed with a 47mm AB gun) and a total of 1,764 of all models would be built from 1933 to 1937. The vehicle would also have a crew compliment of two (with a driver and a commander/gunner.) The T-1 would remain in service as a frontline vehicle until 1940 when the vehicles that were not converted to other purposes were repurposed as training vehicles or to rear-guard duties. Small numbers of the T-1 would be sold abroad, notably to Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, Greece, and Argentina.
 
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T-2.png

The T-2 or the Tractor Model 2 was the CSA's second keg to enter production, in which it was simply a follow-on design to the previous T-1 model. The early models of the T-2 would feature a 13mm automatic-cannon, though vehicles manufactured post 1936 would be upgraded to a Confederate copy of the 20mm Hispano-Suiza HS. 404 cannon. Like it's earlier predecessor and all following Kegs in Confederate service would be given a T designation as means to conceal the design's real purpose from Union observers. A grand total of 1,671 vehicles would be manufactured between 1935 and 1943 and serve in Confederate service throughout the war as a keg, reconnaissance barrel, training vehicle, and some were even modified to carry flamethrowers. The vehicle would also carry a crew of two much like the T-1. The CSA would also export numbers of vehicles to other nations, notably to Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Greece, Spain, Venezuela, and Argentina.

T-3.png

The T-3 was a variant of the T-1 keg which was the Confederate armored force's first dedicated Barrel Hunting vehicle, in which it received a new superstructure with an open turret with a 47mm M1 AB gun. The type would enter service in 1937 and from that year up until 1940, a total of 1,024 T-1 kegs would be converted over to this model. In the opening days of the Second Great War in North America, the T-3 would equip Confederate cavalry, motorized, and infantry units and would perform well against Union barrels, notably the M2A4 and M3 Pulaski kegs. The Confederates would supply large numbers of the T-3s to their Mexican and Dominican Allies starting in 1942.
T-3A1.png

However by the start of 1942, the Confederate Army was starting encounter Union vehicles with heavier armor, in which the Confederates would make attempts to counter this. One of these was the 47mm M1942 Anti-Barrel Gun, which a version of the previous M1 that would now carry a new anti-barrel shell type which could easily penetrate thicker armor. In which a total of 38 of the T-3 vehicles would be modified to carry the new gun, under the new designation of T-3A1. In the Spring of 1942 in Michigan, the new variant would be field tested against Union armored forces there, but unfortunately, the new gun was unable to beat the armor of the M2 Custers. Following their field testing, the survivors would be relegated to the New Mexico Front where they soldiered on there until late 1943 when they were finally retired due to a lack of spare parts.
 
View attachment 597047
The T-2 or the Tractor Model 2 was the CSA's second keg to enter production, in which it was simply a follow-on design to the previous T-1 model. The early models of the T-2 would feature a 13mm automatic-cannon, though vehicles manufactured post 1936 would be upgraded to a Confederate copy of the 20mm Hispano-Suiza HS. 404 cannon. Like it's earlier predecessor and all following Kegs in Confederate service would be given a T designation as means to conceal the design's real purpose from Union observers. A grand total of 1,671 vehicles would be manufactured between 1935 and 1943 and serve in Confederate service throughout the war as a keg, reconnaissance barrel, training vehicle, and some were even modified to carry flamethrowers. The vehicle would also carry a crew of two much like the T-1. The CSA would also export numbers of vehicles to other nations, notably to Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Greece, Spain, Venezuela, and Argentina.

View attachment 597048
The T-3 was a variant of the T-1 keg which was the Confederate armored force's first dedicated Barrel Hunting vehicle, in which it received a new superstructure with an open turret with a 47mm M1 AB gun. The type would enter service in 1937 and from that year up until 1940, a total of 1,024 T-1 kegs would be converted over to this model. In the opening days of the Second Great War in North America, the T-3 would equip Confederate cavalry, motorized, and infantry units and would perform well against Union barrels, notably the M2A4 and M3 Pulaski kegs. The Confederates would supply large numbers of the T-3s to their Mexican and Dominican Allies starting in 1942.
View attachment 597052
However by the start of 1942, the Confederate Army was starting encounter Union vehicles with heavier armor, in which the Confederates would make attempts to counter this. One of these was the 47mm M1942 Anti-Barrel Gun, which a version of the previous M1 that would now carry a new anti-barrel shell type which could easily penetrate thicker armor. In which a total of 38 of the T-3 vehicles would be modified to carry the new gun, under the new designation of T-3A1. In the Spring of 1942 in Michigan, the new variant would be field tested against Union armored forces there, but unfortunately, the new gun was unable to beat the armor of the M2 Custers. Following their field testing, the survivors would be relegated to the New Mexico Front where they soldiered on there until late 1943 when they were finally retired due to a lack of spare parts.
I love your designs!!!
 
T-4.png

The T-4 would be developed in the middle of 1930s as part of Featherston's Rearmament Program, in which the design would incorporate the Horstman suspension system which was used on the previous iterations of the T series of Kegs. The vehicle would be armed with a single M2 47mm AB gun and a co-axial M1937 "Ripper" machine-gun and it came with a crew of four, with a driver, radio operator/commander, gunner, and gun loader. The vehicle would enter production in 1938 and it would equip the Confederacy's cavalry, motorized infantry, marine divisions. The model would be produced from 1938 to 1944 with a grand total of 1,704 vehicles being manufactured and numbers being exported to Venezuela, Argentina, South Africa, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Colombia.
T-4A1.png

In 1942, a variant of the T-4 known as the T-4A1 would be introduced into service as a Barrel Hunter, in which it would feature a new M4 57mm AB (which was a copy of the British QF 6 Pounder Anti-Tank Gun). The T-4A1 would see service from the Battle of Pittsburgh all the way to war's end as Barrel-Hunter despite the increasing thickness of armor on Union barrels.
 
View attachment 597290
The T-4 would be developed in the middle of 1930s as part of Featherston's Rearmament Program, in which the design would incorporate the Horstman suspension system which was used on the previous iterations of the T series of Kegs. The vehicle would be armed with a single M2 47mm AB gun and a co-axial M1937 "Ripper" machine-gun and it came with a crew of four, with a driver, radio operator/commander, gunner, and gun loader. The vehicle would enter production in 1938 and it would equip the Confederacy's cavalry, motorized infantry, marine divisions. The model would be produced from 1938 to 1944 with a grand total of 1,704 vehicles being manufactured and numbers being exported to Venezuela, Argentina, South Africa, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Colombia.
View attachment 597291
In 1942, a variant of the T-4 known as the T-4A1 would be introduced into service as a Barrel Hunter, in which it would feature a new M4 57mm AB (which was a copy of the British QF 6 Pounder Anti-Tank Gun). The T-4A1 would see service from the Battle of Pittsburgh all the way to war's end as Barrel-Hunter despite the increasing thickness of armor on Union barrels.
I really like your T-4, its just right IMO.
 
Hughes Wolfhound
CS Fighter..png

Introduced in late 1943 the Wolfhound was to replace the aging Hound Dog but was never able to so due to poor state of the Confederacy's industrial structure after three years of the Union's unrelenting bombing campaign.
 

Pangur

Donor
Hughes Wolfhound
View attachment 597562

Introduced in late 1943 the Wolfhound was to replace the aging Hound Dog but was never able to so due to poor state of the Confederacy's industrial structure after three years of the Union's unrelenting bombing campaign.
Love it and its near enough perfect for some awesome paint jobs. I`m thinking along the lines of Imperial German flying circus
 
Love it and its near enough perfect for some awesome paint jobs. I`m thinking along the lines of Imperial German flying circus
Interesting, I could play with the paintjobs and then post them over on the alt aircraft pic thread if they're not TL-191 planes or maybe I could do a captured Wolfhound in Austro-Hungarian colors but how would a plane from the North American theater end up in Austria?
 

Pangur

Donor
Interesting, I could play with the paintjobs and then post them over on the alt aircraft pic thread if they're not TL-191 planes or maybe I could do a captured Wolfhound in Austro-Hungarian colors but how would a plane from the North American theater end up in Austria?
Captured and shared with US`s European allies. Maybe post war (again) and they are war birds
 
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