TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

As I understand, Hughes Aircraft is one of the main CSA Aircraft producers. (based more on Howard Hughes being born in Texas, i reckon, as the IRL Hughes aircraft was based in California)

Vought did have an HQ in Texas, but Chance M. Vought was actually born in New York State, so he'd be for the "Yankees" and so would his company.

Fairchild is another Southern US company, based in San Antonio, Texas, and it was in operation from 1925, so i could see them being mixed up in the "Confederate Citrus company" shenanigans and other such subterfuge.

Of course, if folks want to come up with their own companies (lets be fair, The Author didn't give us much to work with here) we do have such figures as Aviation Pioneer Augustus Herring of Covington, Georgia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustus_Moore_Herring (slightly ambiguous as to his actual contributions, but still)

We also have Aviation figures like Admiral Richard Byrd (the Polar explorer) who was from Virginia. His historical position could have him filling a Kesselring-style role of a ground commander despite being an air force officer (Kesselring was the German commander in the Mediterranian theatre: Rommel actually answered to him)

and Long-distance Pilot Douglass Corrigan of Galveston, Texas (he was a mechanic for Charles Lindburgh on The Spirit of St. Louis and made an unsanctioned flight from New York to Ireland) so I could see him Competing with Lindburgh in TL-191 or perhaps being an Adolf Galland-type officer in the air force.
 
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As I understand, Hughes Aircraft is one of the main CSA Aircraft producers. (based more on Howard Hughes being born in Texas, i reckon, as the IRL Hughes aircraft was based in California)

Vought did have an HQ in Texas, but Chance M. Vought was actually born in New York State, so he'd be for the "Yankees" and so would his company.

Fairchild is another Southern US company, based in San Antonio, Texas, and it was in operation from 1925, so i could see them being mixed up in the "Confederate Citrus company" shenanigans and other such subterfuge.
Well, seems like that I have missed something as I was doing research on the Vought Company.
 
Had an idea for the CSA to use licence-built Panhard 179s as recon vehicles, they could use the Zouave name - someone suggested that would be good for something adopted from France.

For 12.7mm MG cartridges, the South could always use the Vickers .50 (12.7x81mm) cartridge, adopted for whatever Southern!Browning they are using.

I would also call the CSA STuG equivalent the Rifleman, while the jagdpanther counterpart would be the Sharpshooter but that's my opinion.
 
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Had an idea for the CSA to use licence-built Panhard 179s as recon vehicles, they could use the Zouave name - someone suggested that would be good for something adopted from France.

For 12.7mm MG cartridges, the South could always use the Vickers .50 (12.7x81mm) cartridge, adopted for whatever Southern!Browning they are using.

I would also call the CSA STuG equivalent the Rifleman, while the jagdpanther counterpart would be the Sharpshooter but that's my opinion.
Maybe the Stug is the "Boone" after Daniel Boone? I named the Jagdpanther the "Elephant" in my drawings of CSA barrels.
 
Some fictional barrels inspired by TL-191

Bear Barrel.jpg

Model of a Black Bear Barrel, a legendary Confederate barrel whose design was copied from U.S. barrels.

desert jaguar barrel.jpg

Model of a U.S.-inspired Confederate Jaguar Barrel. These types mostly saw action in Sonora, Chihuahua, and western Texas.

Confederate Barrel SGW.jpg

Model of a Confederate Barrel, often called the "Grey-Fox Barrel" or the "M4 Jackson Barrel"
 
OTL that happened often in WW II: the Germans and Japanese often had sailors fighting as infantry-either in extremis as in the Germans' case, or in the Japanese, "Naval Guard Units"-coastal defense and AA units that defended many a Pacific Island. They also had the "Special Naval Landing Force" sailors trained as infantry to spearhead amphibious landings; when writers refer to "Japanese Marines," it's these guys.
 

Here's something that I could see being use during the SGW, Barrel Turret Bunkers, more so with the Confederates as an attempt to impede the Northern Invasion of the South.
 
OTL that happened often in WW II: the Germans and Japanese often had sailors fighting as infantry-either in extremis as in the Germans' case, or in the Japanese, "Naval Guard Units"-coastal defense and AA units that defended many a Pacific Island. They also had the "Special Naval Landing Force" sailors trained as infantry to spearhead amphibious landings; when writers refer to "Japanese Marines," it's these guys.
Not to mention the Soviet/Russian Morskaya Pekhota (which Vasily Zaitsev started off in), and ongoing USN/RN use of ship-generated landing parties where the Marines would be a hammer too heavy (mostly in the pre-WWII era and somewhat afterward). It's actually a pretty normal thing for many militaries, units like the USMC are distinctive in part due to their size and separate identity compared to many other such branches.
 
Some more Confederate Small Arms


Ferguson Model G-55 SMG - Used by the Confederate Police and the Freedom Party Guards.
Tredegar M1916-42.png

Tredegar M1916/42 LMG - Originally an aircraft mounted machine-gun, adapted for ground use when the 7.7mm Confederate round was deemed obsolete in the AA role.
TAMG M1916.png

Tredegar M1916 Aircraft Machine Gun - Developed in the early 1930s, the design was used on many Confederate designs with a high rate of fire.
 
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M9 General Jackson (The Stonewall).

In the spring of 1944 the Confederate States of America was facing certain defeat but CS President Jake Featherstone refused to accept the reality of the situation and continued to draw up new battle plans and ordering new weapons systems into production, there were few in the CSA who tried to get him to see reason.

Great Britain for one did all they could to encourage the CS leader that all was not lost and continued to share new technologies and weapons with their CS ally.
One new weapon that was given to the CS was the long barreled 77 HV cannon, Featherstone immediately ordered a new barrel be designed to take the gun and be put into production as soon as possible.

The new barrel was designed with as much proven technology as the CS had accumulated during the war but their was debate over which tech's to use which to forgo but in the end a considerably decent medium barrel was built and was accepted into service in late 1944.
CSA President Jake Featherstone was known for not being one who reveled in the glorification of the Generals of the War of Succession but in spite of this (or perhaps because of it) the new barrel was dubbed the "M9 Gen. Jackson" and was nicknamed the "Stonewall" by CS troops.

It was rumored after the war by those of the High Command that survived the war that Featherstone after learning of the new barrel's name, proclaimed that this was the final act of betrayal by his unfaithful and unworthy countrymen.
! M9 Gen. Jackson=.png
 
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It was rumored after the war that when Featherstone learned of the new barrel's name that he proclaimed that this was the final act of betrayal by his unfaithful and unworthy countrymen.
After the war I thought he was shot by Scipio's son in Madison to be fair though I haven't read all the books.
 
After the war I thought he was shot by Scipio's son in Madison to be fair though I haven't read all the books.
I meant to write that it was rumored by those who survived the war that this was one of his final statements before the end of the war, my bad.
 
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FPG Field Officer.png

An illustration of a Freedom Party Guards Field Officer in his grey uniform and without his camouflage belonging to the 1st Honor Guards Division, circa 1943.
 
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