TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. Soundwave3591 Member

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    I think that's part of the issue: the CSA (and post-1776 America as a whole, really) lacks that deep mythology of centuries that the Nazis taped Swastikas all over to justify themselves. Let's not forget that the USA was not yet 200 years old, the CSA not even 100. Folks in North America don't have that same lore and legend to draw upon. Revolutionary Mythos, the Founding Fathers and so forth, only carries so far, and is tainted by connection to the Yankees.

    on the Political side, Featherston used the pre-existing Democratic system of the CSA and a few creative liberties (both on his part and the Author's) to give himself dictatorial powers. the CSA, for all its issues post-GW1, never really dropped into the miasma of Political Turmoil, economic free fall, debauchery and hedonism that 1920's Germany dropped into. the Hyperinflation that ransacked Germany's economy was bad enough, but on a scale of a nation like the CSA? there's really no way it could have recovered. Harry never really explored the political side of the CSA once Featherston became El Presidente/Herr Fuhrer, so we don't really know if the CSA's government operated like the 3rd Reich politcally.

    A more comparable mentality for the CSA might be the post-1871 Revanchism that swept France after the Franco-Prussian War, the spirit of "REVENGE!" that drove them to the military strength that led them to WWI. not as deep as Nazism, but it's something that fits the mood, and ties them ever more to France.
     
  2. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Featherston always reminded me of the Latin and South American dictators who slightly copied the Nazis, like Jaun Peron's Argentina but with Dixie thrown in to boot.
     
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  3. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    I could see something similarly to this particular variant of the forage cap still being warn during the First Great War and later by early Freedom Party.
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    I'm not going to lie when I first saw it I thought "fascist mounties".
    I'd also like to suggest the East German military for the US...
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  4. Polish Eagle AntiFa Supersoldier

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    They could always invent stupid bullshit, the way the Nazis invented a connection to ancient Tibet and crackpot theories like ‘Ice World Doctrine.’ Draw on the ‘original Americans’ thing, play up their Anglo-French descent and contrast it with the racial mongrelization of the US (“Papist Irish, German barbarians, dirty wops,” etc). Then you can layer on stupid bullshit—the ancient Britons are descended from Atlantis! Muh knights of the holy grail!

    The problems with that, though, are that even IOTL those only appealed to a small fraction even of the Nazis and that the CS, presumably, has a lower literacy rate than Germany, so such things would be fringe ideas at best.
     
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  5. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    I could see the more Fundementalist Neo-Freedomites holding the belief that the Anglo-Saxons are descended from the Ancient Israelites, and viewing the Germans and the Yankees as the descendants of the Edomites
     
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  6. Sierra Nagato-class Kuudere

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    I've actually considered that. Something of an adopted Anglo-Celtic mythology developing in the south prior to and after WWI (similar to how Romantic Nationalism was popular in Germany). A noble, brave, white race defending civilization from the hordes form the North. You see shades of this in American Front, when Woodrow Wilson shows up at Anne Colleton's art show, and they refer repeatedly to the CSA representing civilization, and the USA and Germany representing brute reaction against progress. (An ironic contradiction for the CSA, which prides itself on tradition)

    You can also add some early 20th Century "scientific racism" theories that could possibly have informed the opinions of more educated Confederates, and maybe some of the more intelligent among Jake Featherston's inner circle, who might then influence him more. An example being the 1916 book "The Passing of the Great Race", which, while written by a New York OTL, has exactly the sort of drivel that such people would eat up. It divided Europeans into three "races": Nordics (Soldiers! Adventurers! Explorers! Rulers!), Mediterraneans (Physically the least, but superior mentally to the other two, and the leaders in the arts and philosophy) and the Alpines ("essentially peasant in character"). The author latched on to other theories, and opined that the great civilizations of classical antiquity, like the Roman Empire, and the Greek city states, with their mixture of law, military efficiency, philosophy, and art were nly possible by mixing the superior Nordic stock (from northern Europe, Scandinavia, and the British Isles) with the Mediterraneans.

    So, according to him the US had always been of "superior Nordic stock" which was being degenerates by mixture with lesser peoples. This might especially be applicable to the south, which had always been vast majority Anglo-Celtic in heritage, an worked to keep it that way through Reconstruction. HE even, during WWI, reclassified the Germans in a new edition of his book from being mostly Nordic in heritage to mostly Alpine, and increased the amount of Nordic in the French, to make the allies look like superior races.

    Now, combine this with a lot of the imagery and notions of the Second Ku Klux Klan. Now you have a southern ideology that takes elements from this "race theory" as well as imagery of the Knights of the Round table and such, and casts the CSA as defending true white culture against the degenerate Yankee hordes (They're mostly inferior races anyway, aren't they, with all those people immigrating there from eastern and southern Europe?")
     
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  7. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Good points there along with my earlier point about some Freedomites adopting the notion that the Anglo-Saxon Americans along with the English and French are the descendants of the 12 lost tribes of Israel and that the Germans and the Yankees are the descendants of the Edomites.
     
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  8. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Copperpot M1944.png
    An image of one of the last remaining Confederate M1944 "Copperpot" submachine-guns in existence from the collection of Ian McCollum

    In mid 1943, the Confederate High Command realized that the Union Army was closing in on their territory, thus would form the National Assault Force as a means to defend the South from the Yankee Hordes. Along the way, a development process for a last ditch SMG would be made, which the intentions was that it was going to be easily and cheaply built in garages and in small workshops, easy to operate, and easy to maintain. The ultimate design chosen was made by a Confederate Army Major named Augustus Copperpot, who was a Confederate Army mechanic who built his prototype in garage in a mere 2 hours. The gun was then tested and approved for mass production. As hoped, the M1944 SMG would be built in garages, village workshops, and in blacksmith shops, which were far away from known industrial centers. It is estimated that about 195,000 to 242,000 Copperpots were produced, most of them would arm the National Assault Force with others arming the Confederate Army, in which they would use them in a futile effort to defend the Confederacy from the Union Army. When the war ended, most of these guns would be destroyed as very few Union soldiers would take them as souvenirs as they looked cruder than the more desirable Griswold SMGs. Many of them would be melted down to help rebuild the ruined south, while others would be cut up and buried, and there was even one documented instances of about 1,000 M1944s being dumped into the Gulf of Mexico by the USN. Today, about 100 Copperpots are still known to exist, with 67 of them in private collections, and as such, they have become sought after and would often fetch a high dollar price in firearms auctions. The last M1944 sold was back in October of 2019 for a whopping $94,675, which about 10,000 times over the original unit cost which was $10 Confederate Dollars.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2019
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  9. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Scholfeld Rifle.png
    One of the rare examples of the Confederate Improvised Rifle called the Schofield rifle, which was built around a simplified Tredegar bolt-action rifle receiver, along with a modified aircraft machine-gun barrel, a simple wooden stock, and a simplified magazine. These rifles were designed by the Schofield Motor Company, which was a small company from the Jackson Mississippi Region of the Confederacy. Throughout the final months of the war, this model of rifle was manufactured at the Schofield Motor Plant, in which components would be produced by several sub-contractors. In total, 24,241 rifles would be produced, in which these would be issued to the soldiers of the National Assault Force in the Mississippi and Alabama regions of the Confederate during the nation's dying days.
    Anderson Rifle.png
    A rare example of another improvised rifle, this time being an Anderson rifle or officially the M1944 rifle, from the collection of the National Museum of the US Army. The Anderson rifle would be first conceived in late 1943 as a cheap rifle to arm the National Assault Force, though the rifle was designed by the Tredegar Steel Works, a majority of the parts would be built by many sub-contractors through North Carolina and in Virginia. These would also arm the soldiers of the National Assault Force, with between 109,000 and 120,000 rifles made, with most of the guns being distributed to soldiers in Virginia while others being sent to North Carolina. The rifle's unofficial name, Anderson, was the surname of one of the chief engineers of the Tredegar company, Ernest Anderson, who interestingly was one of the chief engineers behind the M1938 battle rifle. Like the Schofield Rifle, not many examples of the Anderson rifle survived to the present day at all.
    Harrington LMG.png
    A photograph of the known sole surviving example of a complete Harrington Light Machine Gun, courtesy from the Cody Firearms Museum. In October of 1943, the Confederate Army would order a specification for a new light machine gun as a cheaper alternative to the M41 Ripper. One of the alternatives to be built was the M1944 Harrington, which was developed by an engineer named Joe Harrington from New Orleans. The LMG was designed to be a simple and cheap weapon to manufacture, which like the Copperpot, was to built in small workshops and in garages. However, only around 1,000 guns were produced, and after the cessation of hostilities, most ended up getting scrapped or destroyed. Two more Harringtons are still known to exist, but the one in the Tredegar Museum and the one at the Museum of the United States Army both have missing parts.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019 at 3:02 PM
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  10. James Ricker Own your mistakes

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    The thing about the last ditch Confederate firearms was they were never intended to be quality weapons and due to the varying conditions of their manufacturing facilities and material shortages in the last year of the war, many were not built to the standards originally specified.
    The Schofield was a usable rifle but due to its rather stiff bolt troops preferred surplus bolt-action rifles from the first Great War. The Anderson rifle was actually pretty reliable and well liked by those who used it. As for the Harrington light machine gun the less said about it the better.
    The Copper Pot's reputation for unreliability was overblown. Due to its low powered cartridge it was more reliable than many last-ditch weapons. Unfortunately being a submachine gun it was necessary to get close to the enemy, at those ranges a weapon malfunction usually proved fatal to the user.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019 at 2:29 AM
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  11. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    Your mention of Scientific Racism reminds me of a post that I've thought about writing. While those type of theories had some popularity and legal precedent in the United States in OTL, I specifically thought about how Evolution would be received by the Confederate population. In general, Evolution is seen as a "godless science" mostly in the CSA and it is not taught at all in general schools, except for maybe in universities.

    It's only when Featherston is elected president that he decides to use evolution as a tool to justify the "inherent inferiority" of Blacks and makes it compulsory for every Confederate school to teach it. I can see a lot of propaganda being made and successfully persuasive.

    Even after the SGW is over many years later, I can see how some of the surviving Black Confederates, most of which now live secular lives after having their faith brutally broken, are still hesitant to accept evolution as something that is true.
     
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  12. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Another Last Ditch Confederate SMG, this one is basically a TZ-45 of OTL with a different name.
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    In October of 1943, the Confederate Military began to investigate a possible cheaper alternative to the Griswold submachine-gun for it's Regular Army, the answer came in the form of a submission from the Mobile Naval Arsenal in the form of the Smith Gun (alternatively the Mobile Arsenal). The Smith Gun was developed by a worker named Archibald Smith, who produced a prototype gun using materials at the shipyard. The weapon would soon be adopted into service and would be produced the Mobile Naval Arsenal, Stinson Arms Company in New Orleans, and the Schofield Motor Company, as well as many of the weapon's components being built by many subcontractors. Like with many of the Confederacy's Last Ditch weapons, the Mobile Arsenal would never save the Confederacy from ultimate defeat. In March of 1944, the Mobile Naval Arsenal would be bombed by the Union, thus ending production of the Smith Gun there. Currently, only a handful of these Smith guns are still known to be in existence, two being at the Cody Firearms Museum and one at a Museum in Jackson with seven more being in private hands.
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    When the Tredegar Rifle entered service with the Confederate Army, the Army Ordnance Board would order a variant chambered for .22 Long Rifle to serve as a training rifle. This rifle would be known as the Wyatt M1910, which was named after Lieutenant John Wyatt, an officer from the Ordnance Board. After the 1st Great War, the rifle would remain in production, and many Tredegars would be converted into this format of training rifle. After the rise of the Freedom Party, the Party would encourage target shooting programs to the public. As a result, thousands of the Wyatt rifles would be manufactured to serve in this role as a training rifle for these Military Competition Shoots. When war broke out, production of the Wyatt Rifle would be terminated as there were more than enough rifles to use to trainer new soldiers available. Union soldiers commonly take these .22 training rifles as souvenirs and would use them as squirrel guns.
     
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