TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    I remember one book where Confederates, Mexicans and Native Americans were fighting together in the First Great War.
     
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  2. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Yup! That's "Breakthroughs" I believe. Gosh, just imagine that though. All of them fighting in a hellish, oil soaked landscape akin to a muddy Gulf War, with oil fields set on fire, trenches dug into into a oily ground with a thick black sky above. They'd be wearing gas masks just to filter out the toxins in the air.
     
  3. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Hell on Earth.
     
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  4. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Indeed. We may actually get that again in the Second Great War in Texas and Sequoyah. Despite the perplexingly low priority the region would get, we'd probably be seeing a return to that kind of tactic.
     
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  5. Polish Eagle AntiFa Supersoldier

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    Maybe not. The Confederate war plan relied on KO’ing the US in one blow. Supporting a secondary offensive to retake Sequoyah, at the end of a supply line stretching across the entire states of Texas and Arkansas, might be deemed more trouble than it’s worth. The US could sweep down from Missouri to cut off a thrust into the region, in addition to Dowling’s force moving into West Texas. More likely, I think, the CS might devote a substantial portion of its bomber force to destroying the fields and cutting the railroads that link it to the rest of the US, while hoping to win the war and the territory in Ohio.

    So Sequoyah might just be a favorite topic of AH writers ITTL—‘What if Jake Featherston had focused on Sequoyah and retaking pre-GWI Confederate territory?’ Akin to questions like ‘WI Hitler had stopped at Czechoslovakia?’
     
  6. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Colt-Browning_M1895_machine_gun_mid-cycle.jpg
    The M1894 Tredegar-Browning machine gun often dub the "masher" by Confederate soldiers was an early air cooled machine gun that was popularly used by Confederate forces during the first great war.
     
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  7. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Always found this gun kind of peculiar really. That "digger" at the front end always stuck out to be as being incredibly odd.
     
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  8. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    On the other hand it's bound to be much more light weight than other machine guns of the period.
     
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  9. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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  10. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Here's a good look at the uniform the Confederates might have worn in 1914, just before the start of the Great War. I always found it really interesting that, in terms of how fans interpret the various armies, the Confederates essentially look and retain more of the "American" look than the actual United States.

    Artwork can be found here --- >>> https://www.deviantart.com/arget-normand/art/Confederate-Trooper-1914-Harry-Turtledove-370450560

    By Arget-Normand --- https://www.deviantart.com/arget-normand

    confederate_trooper_1914__harry_turtledove__by_arget_normand_d64k1hc-pre.jpg
     
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  11. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Here are a few more photos of Native Americans in uniform for the Great War. Again, not much would probably be different uniform wise, but perhaps there would be some differences in insignia.

    WW1_Native-Americans.jpg

    ^^^ --- Definitely a late war look, when the Brodie helmet would likely be universal as the standard frontline headgear.

    562_square.jpg

    ^^^ --- One with a Springfield M1903. If you're thinking of a way this could fit into the lore, perhaps this brave soldier captured it from a US soldier during a trench raid in Oklahoma or Roanoke.
     
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  12. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Another interesting thing that I can see temporarily or even permanently being used by the Confederate-Indians and Confederate-Whites --- Native American weaponry, specifically axes, war-clubs, and knives specially made for close-quarters trench-raiding.

    While both sides would undoubtedly develop their own close-combat weaponry and "armor" for trench warfare, perhaps on certain fronts in North America the weaponry would take in distinctly regional or tribal aesthetics. Essentially, tribal weapons made from modern materials to be used in frontline trench-combat.

    21627931_1.jpg
    beaded.jpg

    Not saying they should be decorated or anything, but hey. In all likelihood though we would still probably get the same weapons as before --- trench spikes, trench knives, and trench clubs. In this case however, in the Confederate Army they may take on a different form, one more inspired by Native American weaponry.
     
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  13. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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  14. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Tomahawks and war clubs would make excellent trench weapons.
     
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  15. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    They'd have to craft the weapons out of materials lying around the trenches perhaps. Very home-made, possibly crude, but very effective. My guess is that the for the fighting in Texas and Sequoyah, the soldiers here would readily craft trench weapons inspired by the ones used by their people in the past.
     
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  16. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    On potential pre-Great War Confederate uniforms...


    Cadets_by_Meirnon.jpg
    A mostly ceremonial uniform commonly worn during parade ceremonies and other similar functions. That was quickly dropped following the disastrous lost of First Great War and switched over to more modern styled Freedom Party uniforms during the Featherstone era.

    [​IMG]
    Early-Mid Great War uniforms still retaining some of the older "ceremonial" aspects of 19th century uniforms.
    Source: https://www.deviantart.com/goeliath/art/Alternate-History-Confederate-Soldier-631407506


    [​IMG]
    Potential Second Mexican war uniform of the Confederate Army.
    Source: https://www.deviantart.com/manulacanette/art/Zouave-Pontifical-689195498

    This looks awesome! I could definitely see it being the type of uniform commonly worn by the CS army during the Second Great War.
     
  17. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Well, thank you, the artist deserves a lot of credit for this one. As you can see its not much different that the US Army BD in our timeline, but with some noticeable alterations --- the absence of green and certain insignia for example.

    Yes. With the Confederacy finally independent, and with two wars behind them ensuring that independence stays, along with trading partners like Britain and France, the Confederate Army would finally be able to afford standardized uniforms with an overall standardized looks and color. From 1862 to 1882 that color may have been gray, but after the 1890s it is highly possible that the standard uniform would be switched over to the khaki --- or butternut, as the Confederates like to call it --- mimicking the British BD.

    But yes, a more formal and more gray uniform for the Army just before the 20th century is highly likely.
     
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  18. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    So, how do you guys feel about a Surcouf-style Confederate submarine for the Second Great War?

    No, I don't imagine many of them would be built, if at all, but if they did --- maybe two. Just to say the Confederate Navy gave the idea a try.

    Surcouf_FRA.jpg
    maxresdefault.jpg
     
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  19. Danthefan28 Well-Known Member

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    What the hell am I looking at? And why haven't I've heard of it.
     
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  20. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Well, friend, meet the French submarine-cruiser Surcouf! --- >>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_submarine_Surcouf

    This sub was the only one of its kind built by the French Navy in our timeline to circumvent the restrictions of the Washington Naval Treaty after WWI. It put strict limits on naval construction by limiting displacements and gun calibers on battleships and cruisers. No accord was signed concerning frigates, destroyers, and submarines however and the French saw this as a possible loop hole to exploit. Submarines designed like the Surcouf would have been engaging surface targets while on the surface, but of course had the ability to dive. They would have been used to attack convoys and other smaller enemy ships, essentially acting like scouts or raiders.

    The Surcouf didn't see a lot of intense action however, disappearing in 1942. There were some major technical issues because of the guns mounted on her of course, but it was a fairly notable and novel design to try and address a limitation post-WWI.

    Now, for TL-191, I'm proposing that, perhaps, the Confederates might try to make a submarine like this, perhaps as a way to economize development for their Navy as well as to circumvent any naval restrictions imposed on them. I'm not saying they'd be successful, but that they'd give it a try.
     
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