TL-191: Command - Battles, Campaigns, and Offensives Across the World, 1861-1944

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Sep 15, 2018.

  1. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    TL:191 is a world of wars and unending strife. Beyond the conflicts between the Confederacy and United States, the world tears itself apart, ushering in an unprecedented era of human history.

    On this thread share your own thoughts and interpretations of how the many battles across North America played out. Talk about the gritty details and grim small scale actions of the men fighting among the ruins of Pittsburgh or discuss the large, sweeping operations undertaken by General Patton in his drive across Ohio to split the United States in two.

    Create and share your own skirmishes, engagements, campaigns, and battles and how you believed they'd play out! From the big battles depicted in the books to ones that you believe may have occurred, from the dense forests of the Wilderness of Northern Virginia to the sun drenched sands of the Caribbean, the wars between the states was anything but a small affair.

    Go beyond the wars in North America and expend on the ones abroad! Talk about the battles of the Russian Civil War and how the Tsar was able to keep his throne, discuss how the Japanese were able to take the Philippines from the Spanish, reveal your thoughts on the war at sea between Great Britain and Germany, or ponder the decisions made to drop the super-bombs on Paris.

    TL-191's world is vast and soaked with blood. Tell us how that blood was shed!

    Note: PICTURES OF MAPS, WEAPONS, EQUIPMENT, AND MORE ARE WELCOMED!

    Be as detailed or vague as you want.
     
  2. m0585 Well-Known Member

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    Yes! This will be an awesome thread. I have a few ideas.
     
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  3. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Well that remains to be seen, but I love the enthusiasm! Please do share your thoughts and ideas on anything. It can even be presented as a "wiki" style article.
     
  4. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    Battles of the War of Secession (April 12, 1861- November 4, 1862) after September 10, 1862*
    *NOTE: The Battle of Green River, also known in the United States as the Battle of Mundfordville, is the last battle that occurred without being directly affected by the point of divergence that resulted in Special Order-191 being successfully delivered to Confederate military leaders.

    • Battle of Harper's Ferry [September 12–15, 1862] in West Virginia (Virginia at the time) ended in Confederate victory, resulting in Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson capturing a Union garrison under Dixon S. Miles.
    • Battle of Green River (Munfordville) [September 14–17, 1862] in Kentucky ended in a Confederate victory.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------***POINT OF DIVERGENCE***------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Battle of Boonsboro (South Mountain), Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam), and Battle of Shepherdstown never occurred due to Special Order 191 never being found by Union forces.
    • Battle of Iuka [September 19, 1862] happened in Mississippi with a Union victory.
    • Battle of Wood Lake [September 23, 1862] in Minnesota, part of the Dakota War of 1862, resulted in a overwhelming defeat of Santee Sioux forces.
    • Battle of Sabine Pass [September 24, 1862] in Texas resulted in a Union victory.
    • Battle of Newtonia [September 30, 1862] occurred in Missouri and resulted in a Confederate victory.
    • Battle of Camp Hill [October 1, 1862] was a battle that only occurred in TL-191 when McClellan's forces were surprised and defeated by General Robert E. Lee's army. Lee would eventually capture and occupy Philadelphia. The Army of the Potomac under McClellan surrendered to General Robert E. Lee on October 4, 1862 in Old City Hall Philadelphia.
    • Battle of Saint John's Bluff [October 1–3, 1862] happened in Florida with a Union victory.
    • Second Battle of Corinth [October 3–4, 1862] in Mississippi resulting in a Union victory.
    • Battle of Galveston Harbor [October 4, 1862] occurred in Texas with a Union victory.
    • Battle of Hatchie's Bridge [October 5, 1862] happened in Tennessee with an Inconclusive result: Confederate force under Earl Van Dorn escapes across river.
    • Battle of Chaplin Hills (Perryville) [October 8, 1862] in Kentucky but instead of an Inconclusive result in OTL, a Confederate victory occurred that ended Bragg's Kentucky campaign in his favor.
    A few battles occurred after the Battle of Camp Hill until the official end of the war on November 4, 1862.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_American_Civil_War_battles
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
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  5. Tiro Well-Known Member

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    Excellent, I'll have to dig through the kennels for my Pet Theories regarding wars in the wider world of Timeline-191!
     
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  6. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Looking forward to it then! I'm sure everyone's got their own ideas on how certain battles played out.
     
  7. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Interesting that you put the date in which Special Order 191 was written to the army as a starting point! Very clever!

    So, what you're implying here is that the battles that are italicized are the ones that are either changed as a result of the divergence or occur because of the divergence, yes? Like the Battle of Camp Hill - that battle not occur in our time line, but pops up in TL-191's timeline. Or the Battle of Perryville (Chaplin Hills), in which you say the Kentucky Campaign ends favorably for General Bragg. Do the other battles listed here change as well?

    The Battle of Iuka is ranked as a "C" battle CWSAC - a formative battle that had an affect on the regional campaign, but not on the war as a whole. Sabine Pass, Newtonia, Saint John's Bluff, Second Corinth and Galveston Harbor also seem to be ranked "C" or "D", either having affects on the campaign in the area, but were not far reaching enough in their consequences.

    The Battle of Perryville, however, is ranked as "A" - a consequential battle that had lasting affects for the conduct and course of the campaign and perhaps even the war.

    Kentucky_Tennessee_Campaign_1862.jpg

    Based on the locations of some of these battles - it seems this is the Kentucky Campaign (alternatively known as the Heartland Campaign) undertaken by Braxton Bragg in 1862, all part of the Western Theater.

    Mind clarifying? I'm interested as to why you listed these battles!

    Also, based on the Turtledove wiki, it might be interesting to note that the Confederates seem to have won a victory at the Second Battle of Corinth on October 3rd to 4th in this timeline instead of losing, although it doesn't give details as to how. General Bragg is mentioned to have moved into Kentucky by this time, successfully taking the state.

    With this in mind, and in combination with McClellan's crushing defeat at Camp Hill on October 1st, we may actually be seeing not just one, but two almost simultaneous blows against Union forces, that is if the Battle of Perryville ends in a favorable victory for Bragg.

    http://turtledove.wikia.com/wiki/War_of_Secession <--- link to the page I got that bit of info from.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
  8. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    @Allochronian - I edited my response to you. It includes a map of the Kentucky Heartland Campaign and the movements of armies around Corinth. Maps really help me visualize whats going, because its hard for me to picture where each battle is taking place lol

    Again, some of the battles you listed there seem to be part of this campaign, while Corinth was part of the smaller Iuka-Corinth Campaign, seemingly meant to support Bragg and is advance into Kentucky. The Confederates are actually said to have won the Second Battle of Corinth in October of 1862. If that's the case we may be looking at significant blows against the Union in TL-191 that occur almost back to back with the victory at Camp Hill.

    So, it might interesting to learn more about the Second Battle of Corinth and see how a Confederate victory might have been pulled from it.

    *Edit - The Siege of Corinth occurred from April 29th to May 30th 1862. Corinth, a vital railway junction that was very important to General Grant's plans in the Western Theater, would still be in Federal hands by October. Its seizure by Confederate General Van Dorn and General Price would prove significant if pulled off correctly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
  9. m0585 Well-Known Member

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    I think I'll do a GWII Battle of Chattanooga. I've always wanted to flesh out the assaults on Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain by U.S. airborne troops.
     
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  10. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    Needs to be stated why Grant gets scapegoated into a massive drunken bum that meets Frederick Douglas in HFR.

    I mean, if the POD is a double blow of Corinth in May and Camp Hill in September, Grant still is the most successful commander of the war on the union side.
     
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  11. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    The battles that are italicized are the ones that either occurred exclusively in TL-191 or had a result that were different from OTL. The battles between these two still occurred both in TL-191 and in OTL with the same results because they were not directly affected by the Confederate recovery of Special Order 191.

    Correct.

    Neither of these battles were significant enough to determine the final outcome of the war. The Battle of Camp Hill already did that, but other Union leaders didn't know immediately what happened in Philadelphia and continued to fight their winning or losing battles until finding out later during the last few weeks of October.

    First of all, I decided to give some of those battles that I listed their "Southern name" because since the War of Secession ended in the Confederacy's favor, they would be known by the name the winner chose.

    Second, the "Second Battle of Corinth" did not occur in Kentucky; it was in Mississippi. The Turtledove wiki mentions that there was a "Battle of Corinth" in Kentucky that was won by Bragg. I reasoned that such a battle would have occurred after he won in Perryville and continued north to reach Corinth. I chose not to mention this Corinth so that it wouldn't be confused with the one in Mississippi. Perhaps a Confederate capture of Philadelphia would have caused enough butterfly effects for a significant amount of Union troops to go and try to retake the city but at the cost of losing the whole state of Kentucky.

    I imagine that the Capture of Philadelphia, Conquest of Kentucky and both British and French recognition of the Confederacy occurring during the same month would be the source of so much trauma that Washington, D.C. would be compelled to surrender.

    I mentioned these battles because they occurred during the most crucial months that eventually resulted in a Southern victory in TL-191. I wanted to give a reasonable "historical account" of how the War of Secession would have ended with some specific details. I would have mentioned all the previous battles before September 1862, but it was too much.

    I apologize for any mistakes I may have overlooked.

    By the way, nice map.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
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  12. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Note:
    • ** - these two asterisks mean that events played out differently than they did in our timeline
    • Admittedly I took some liberties with the speed of communicating news throughout the United States, so I apologize if it seems I relied too much on news spreading abnormally to make this particular event happen.

    The War of Secession, 1861-1862 - The Confederacy Strikes Back: The 2nd Battle of Corinth, October 3rd - 4th


    Corinth.jpg

    Background:

    In the east, Confederate General Robert E. Lee dealt a crushing blow to Union General George McClellan on October 1st at Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, successfully defeating the Army of the Potomac and marching north toward Philadelphia. As Lee advanced, so too did General Braxton Bragg and General Edmund Kirby Smith in the west.

    Earlier in 1862 the strategic situation shifted in favor the Union. With the fall of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson in February, combined with the capture of the critical rail junction at Corinth, Mississippi in May, the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers were now in firm Union control. This, along with the Union's capture of New Orleans earlier in May, severely threatened the Confederates' control of the Mississippi River. The Confederacy was in danger of being cut in two. The only obstacles standing in the way of complete control of the Mississippi River were Port Hudson and Vicksburg. The last vital stretch of the Mississippi river linking the two halves of the Confederacy had to be defended at all costs. Vicksburg was a primary target.

    Something needed to be done.

    Prelude:

    As Confederate General Braxton Bragg moved north from Tennessee into Kentucky in September 1862, Union Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell pursued him from Nashville with his army. Bragg's intent was to forcibly take the state of Kentucky and draw Union attention away from Vicksburg and Chattanooga. Many residents in the state itself were pro-secessionist and the advocated for the support of the Confederacy in bringing the state onto their side. The state also produced hemp and grew cotton and tobacco and was a major slave trade center. Taking the state would severely disrupt logistics and operations in the west.

    As Bragg moved north and invaded Kentucky Confederate forces under the commands of General Van Dorn and General Price moved north to support Bragg's efforts, intending to advance into Tennessee. This force, however, was also needed to prevent Union General Buell from both pursuing Bragg and being reinforced by General U.S. Grant. Since the Siege of Corinth in May, Grant had been protecting supply lines all across western Tennessee and northern Mississippi, with a Union force garrisoned at the major supply base of Corinth. Van Dorn and Price were then committed to support Bragg by disrupting Grant's communications and supplies in this region, further tying down Union forces in the West.

    General Price attempted to move north in a link up with Van Dorn, but was checked at the Battle of Iuka on September 19, allowing General Rosecrans to claim a victory. However, Rosecrans failed to prevent the Confederates under Price from escaping and did little to pursue. He later marched into Corinth after the battle. Meanwhile Price's force later linked up with General Van Dorn's army in Ripley, Mississippi on September 28th. From there the two armies merged under the command of the more senior Van Dorn, numbering a total of 22,000 men. They then marched north to Pocahontas, Tennessee and reached the town by October 1st.

    ** On that same day in the east, Robert E. Lee defeated George McClellan in the Battle of Camp Hill in Pennsylvania. Although news spread quickly of the defeat in the east, this was not the case for the west. It would be some time until news reached the commanders here, at best a few days. Until then the fighting went on as usual.

    Grant was uncertain of Van Dorn's intentions, sending out scouting parties to ascertain and calculate where his Confederate foe would move next. When Grant received word that Van Dorn's force moved west to the town of Chewalla, Tennessee, we grew more certain that the vital rail junction of Corinth was the target. If taken, General Rosecrans would be isolated from reinforcements, allowing the Confederates to move further north into Tennessee to support Bragg from a well stocked and defended supply base. Grant could not let that happen.

    He sent messages to Hurlbut ordering him to keep an eye out for the enemy and to strike if an opportunity was there to do so. Although Rosecrans received the warning from Grant, he was not convinced that Corinth was the target. He didn't think the Confederates would be brash enough to attack the fortified town, believing they would strike the Mobile-Ohio railroad and maneuver the U.S. soldiers out of their positions.

    With 23,000 men positioned in good rifle pits, well-dug entrenchments, and strong earth-work batteries, Rosecrans' overall plan if attacked was to absorb the Confederate assaults upon the entrenchments, giving ground when necessary to pull the enemy in and bleed them white against even stronger defense closer to the town.

    Battle: October 3rd

    Corinth_October_3_1862.png

    Van Dorn's 22,000 men began his attack at 10 AM that morning. His plan was a double envelopment of the entrenchments and rifle pits in front of him. Lovell would start the attack in an effort to make Rosecrans weaken his right to reinforce McKean, allowing Price to make the main assault against Davies on the Union right and enter the entrenchments. Lovell made a determined attack and as soon as he became engaged Maury opened the fight with Davies's left. McArthur quickly moved four regiments up to support the defense against Lovell. When Davies advanced his line to the entrenchments it left a gap between Davies and McKean. The Confederates forced their way through this gap around 1:30 PM. With Confederates pouring through the gap the whole Union line fell back to the redoubts outside of Corinth. Two pieces of artillery were captured and many dead and wounded lay on the field in the wake of the retreat.

    At 3 PM Hamilton was urged to change positions and attack the Confederates pouring in through the gap on their left flank. By some grave misunderstanding of the urgent order Hamilton failed to move in time to exploit an opportunity to attack the Confederates flank and it was sunset before the division before the division finally moved, abandoning their position on the right and falling back to the redoubts and batteries outside of Corinth.

    As the sun finally set on the battlefield Rosecrans' army found itself driven back on all sides, taking cover behind the redoubts and batteries. Soldiers on both sides were exhausted from the intense fighting. The weather was unbearably hot during the day and had barely cooled once night fell. Water was especially scarce as men fainted and fell from the extreme labor of fighting. Van Dorn's army slept within 600 yards of the Union entrenchments and he made an effort to reposition his men during the night for the inevitable attack tomorrow.

    Rosecrans was not supremely confident in his army's performance that day and was extremely tired and bewildered from the fighting and heat. He believed he was outnumbered by his opponent and tried his best to make do with the circumstances dealt to him. He failed to put more men into the field and failed to properly coordinated them. He had to do better. By contrast Van Dorn was out for blood and was looking forward to the morning to start his attack again. Deciding to go for a more straightforward plan to rout Rosecrans, Van Dorn would rely on the bravery of his infantry and the withering fire of his artillery to break the Union lines.

    ** That night news of the defeat at Camp Hill was relayed via telegraph to the various commanders in the field around Corinth. The defeat completely stunned Rosecrans, but be took a measure of grim satisfaction that George McClellan, the man who had previously disagreed with him about plans for West Virginia, was licked so thoroughly by Robert E. Lee. But that feeling soon soured. The casualties were said to be enormous and General Lee was said to already be on his way Philadelphia. With Washington D.C. and Philadelphia threatened, Rosecrans grew more uncertain.

    ** Van Dorn was elated by the news of the Camp Hill. With the Union's capital and major cities now within striking distance of the Confederacy, the pressure on the Union now and the initiative was placed firmly in Confederate's favor in the east. Spirited and confident in the news of such success, he was surely more enthusiastic for morning to come than his counter part. Less out for blood now and more determined to press his advantage he sent word to his commanders to prepare for an attack come day break, urging them to be ready. Commander Herbert sent word before the initial bombardment that he was feeling ill and was replaced by Commander Martin Green. Green was ordered by Van Dorn to be ready for the attack at dawn, not wishing to lose momentum or shock. Green made this sentiment clear to his own subordinates and urged them to reposition in preparation. Despite the men's exhaustion there was notable change in their morale. The men waited steadfastly until morning, awoken by the sound of the guns.


    Battle: October 4th

    Corinth_October_4_1862.png

    At 4:30 AM the Confederate guns opened up on the Union inner line of entrenchments. The bombardment which kept up until after sunrise, pinning down Union forces under a withering hail of cannon fire. When the guns fell silent, the U.S. troops prepared themselves to resist an attack.

    ** Green was immediately able to move into the attack with four brigades in echelon and his men occupying positions in the woods north of town. His men then charge on Battery Powell, while the brigades of Moore and Colbert attacked Hamilton's line. The assault on the battery was surprisingly successful, with the men coming upon the still stunned Union troops from Illinois and Iowa, scattering them in quick order as they took the guns and turned them on Hamilton's position in support of Colbert's Confederates.

    **Hamilton's position was shelled and the retreating men from Battery Powell disorganized his lines and sowed panic into his men, with officers trying to get them under control. Unable to properly repulse the attack on his position from both Colbert and Green and unable to support Davies on his left, Hamilton ordered his men to fall back toward the Farmington Road just outside of Corinth, but in the ensuing confusion is men fell as far back as the town itself, hastily setting up defensive positions as quick as they could. Out-flanked and unable to hold against Green, with Colbert's men soon advancing up behind him and threatening to surround him, Davies ordered his troops to fall back toward the town, incapable of rallying them for a counter-attack against Battery Powell.

    ** Meanwhile, Maury's troops had been engaged while Battery Powell was being attacked. As soon as he heard the fighting on his left, he knew that Davies and Hamilton would be kept too busy to interfere with his movements. As Davies and Hamilton fell back with Colbert and Green close behind Maury pressed his momentum, giving the order for his division to move straight toward the town. His right flank however encountered stubborn resistance from Battery Robinett as it fired 20-pounder Parrot rifles into his ranks. Fierce hand-to-hand combat ensued in arguably the hottest action of the two-day battle. Reinforced with additional men from Green, Battery Robinett was eventually taken, but at high cost for the Texans that assaulted it.

    ** Phifer's brigade on the left met with success, driving back Davies's left flank and entering the town Combining forces with Green and Colbert the Confederates managed to fight their way in Corinth itself. Bloody street fighting erupted within the town and the streets were choked with men and lead. Sullivan's brigade was rushed in to support the disorganized remnants of Davies' and Hamilton's brigades, but determined attacks by the Confederates, who were pouring men into the town, prevented Sullivan from throwing them back, wading into the confusion in the narrow streets, unable to mount a coordinated attack. Artillery fire from Battery Madison rained down on friend and foe alike in a desperate attempt to stave of the Confederates. In face of a more coordinated bayonet charge from Colbert and Green's men the Union troops fell back once again, the captured artillery from Battery Powell and Robinett putting a few units to flight. Cabell's brigade of Maury's division was sent to reinforce the troops that had captured Battery Powell, but instead were redirected to the ensuing battle in Corinth itself.

    ** Lovell had been skirmishing with the Union left in the vicinity of Battery Phillips, in preparation for a general advance. When word reached him that Confederate forces has reached the town and were routing the Union forces he was soon ordered to attack to tie down the Union left.

    ** Unable to salvage the situation on his right Rosecrans ordered a general retreat from Corinth south along the Kossuth Road. With is army in tatters and harassed by Lovells men as they made their retreat, it was clear to Rosecrans that he could not hold out for reinforcements. By 3 PM Corinth was in Confederate hands once again.

    Aftermath:

    Reinforcements from Grant under the command of General James B. McPherson arrived too late to aid Rosecrans. After his scouts reported the situation and verified that the remnants of Rosecrans army retreated south, McPherson was outnumbered and unable to link up with any organized friendly forces in the immediate area. He marched back to Jackson unable to relieve Rosecrans.

    From his location in Jackson, Grant was able to oversee his expanded responsibilities in the region. After losing four divisions from this expanded command Grant's forces shrank from approximately 80,000 men to less than 50,000.

    This put Grant on the defensive as he deployed his remaining forces to protect his positions against several threatening Confederate forces. Grant's forces in the immediate vicinity consisted of 12,000 men at Bolivar, Rosecrans's 23,000 at Corinth, General Sherman's 7,000 at Memphis, and another 6,000 as a general reserve at Jackson.

    The loss of Rosecrans's army at Corinth was a huge blow for Grant. Despite being nearby he was not directly commanding troops on the field. The reinforcement of two divisions from the Army of Tennessee failed to meet up in time and thus forced Grant to recall these divisions to draw out another plan for the area. The Confederate victory caused great worry. With his forces spread thin across Tennessee and northern Mississippi, Grant would need to find a another way to take Corinth back or to stop Van Dorn's advance to the North to assist Bragg in his invasion of Kentucky.

    News of the defeat in the east reached Grant, causing him even more stress. With Philadelphia and Washington D.C. threatened by Robert E. Lee, it was uncertain to him whether or not the Union had the will to fight despite success in the west. But with Corinth back in Confederate control and with Bragg well into Kentucky his successes earlier in the year would soon go up in smoke. Either way, Grant would continue to plan for additional battles in the west to address the problem with Van Dorn in Corinth.

     
  13. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Well, its actually acknowledged that Grant was the most successful commander out west and arguably the most successful on the Union side during the war. Some people that knew him suspected that if he had gone east he would have made a significant difference.

    But since Kentucky falls to the Confederates and the McClellan is licked at Camp Hill in October, the North is understandably reeling from major blows and forced to make a truce as a result. I guess you can say Grant being a drunk is a consequence of his know drinking habit becoming worse over time since her never got his chance to lead the Union to victory.
     
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  14. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Ah, okay then. Thank you for the clarification on that. The timeline of events in TL-191 with the Battle of Camp Hill make this point in time a very interesting and very critical to the survival of the Union. While not every battle would be changed up as a result of TL-191, especially considering their actual impact on the course of events beyond their immediate area, its interesting to see nonetheless.

    Ahahaha, funny that. I seemed to have misinterpreted which Corinth was being talked about. In fact I was so fascinated by the scenario of a Confederate victory at Corinth, Mississippi, that I actually wrote about it and posted the scenario on this thread. Now, arguably, the butterfly effects occur way too quickly for the kind scenario or wrote about and you can argue that butterfly effect was transferred rather literally through telegraph far too rapidly. Regardless I had fun doing it. Its still more of a regional victory rather than a crushing far reaching on. All it really does is shatter Rosecrans and greatly inconveniences Grant as he tries to divert men and materials in way to retake the city. The end of the war puts a stop to that though. Check it out if you're interested!

    And thanks regarding the map. I found it on the internet, I didn't make it though.
     
  15. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    You know I think I'd like to see some sea battles as well, small scale engagements to big decisive ones. I think that would be interesting to see honestly. Would also like to touch upon the many smaller theaters of operation. It would be good to go into detail about the battles for the Bahamas or Haiti even. Or better yet - an US version of "Pavlov's House" in Pittsburgh.
     
  16. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    Military History of Black Americans during the War of Secession, April 12, 1861-November 4, 1862

    While it is generally accepted by historians that Blacks fought in every war that the United States was involved in, their participation between 1861 and 1943 is limited. Only two military units that were primarily made up of Black Americans exist in the historical record: The Black Brigade of Cincinnati and 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The former was merely an unarmed, defensive force that did not participate in combat while the Defense of Cincinnati occurred between September 1–13, 1862, which resulted in a Union strategic victory.



    [​IMG]

    The latter would be the first and only Black regiment to see military action during the Skirmish at Island Mound (October 29, 1862), resulting in a Union victory. However, at this point, the war would be over in a few days. The knowledge of these two different regiments would fade into obscurity until historical research after GWII popularized Black regiments in North American History.

    Sources:
    1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_African_Americans
    2) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milit...ican_Civil_War#Early_battles_in_1862_and_1863
    2) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Brigade_of_Cincinnati
    3) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Kansas_Colored_Volunteer_Infantry_Regiment
    4) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skirmish_at_Island_Mound
    BONUS: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Smalls
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2018
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  17. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Wow, sorry for the very slow response to this!

    This is actually very fascinating to read about. It puts things into perspective here and kind of highlights just how much colored equality was set-back or even stalled in America in TL-191. Victory for the Confederates means that all the initiatives to put black men in uniform to fight for the Union would never see the light of day, nor would the political base to push for such things gather momentum. At this stage in TL-191 these consequences, despite being fairly significant even for this time, would have far-reaching negative results.