TL-191: After the End

Another factor in TTL that hampered the technological development of certain kinds of goods was the relatively high levels of bureaucracy in many countries, though not to the same extent of either the USSR or India’s “Licence Raj” in our world. A more militarized society in many countries also meant that many national governments tended to place a greater emphasis on their military forces instead of facilitating the growth of new consumer markets. This was perhaps to be expected in a 20th Century where the German Empire, and a USA heavily influenced by the German Empire, were the victors of the two Great Wars.

Related to this kinda, I'm guessing the lack of a serious ideological Cold War like OTL (unless one counts the CDS-GEACPS staredown pre-FPW) also slowed down the development of computing technology (and also Turing most certainly wouldn't survive SGW-Britain, whether by superbomb or by a government purge).
 
Related to this kinda, I'm guessing the lack of a serious ideological Cold War like OTL (unless one counts the CDS-GEACPS staredown pre-FPW) also slowed down the development of computing technology (and also Turing most certainly wouldn't survive SGW-Britain, whether by superbomb or by a government purge).

Yes, although there’s still competition between the different great powers during the postwar period in matters related to military and space-related technological development. This isn’t always unfriendly competition, such as with the US/CDS-Austro-Hungarian/German/EC Space Chase.
 
For my replies to this list, I’m writing with the caveat that this is not necessarily what Turtledove had in mind regarding the Action Français regime, but is the case for this TTL. I’m also writing with the assumption that Charles Maurras is premier under King Charles XI.

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Charles Maurras was a true believer in the righteousness of Action Français. Like others in the leadership of AF, Maurras envisioned the “restoration” of France as an absolutist, Catholic monarchy, and the complete repudiation of republicanism and the French Revolution. Maurras also believed that this monarchist counter-revolution was the only way France could militarily restore its prestige against its German and US foes. Maurras, as well as serving King Charles XI as premier, was also the regime’s dominant ideologue.

Maurras worked to lay the groundwork for the final end to any and every republican institution, though he did not succeeded in an early attempt to abolish the National Assembly. The AF regime under Maurras instead worked behind the scenes to establish parallel systems of political power, ostensibly in the name of the restored monarchy. Postwar historians in TTL debated to what extent Charles XI directly participated in establishing parallel “royalist” corridors of power, though the leadership role played by Maurras in wielding power in royalist organizations, including the Milice française, was not disputed during the postwar years.

One of the central aspects of the Action Français regime was its antisemitism. Maurras had an absolute hatred of Jews that went back to before the First Great War. Under the AF regime, Jews were blamed for virtually all of the social and economic problems in French society, and were accused of providing covert support for the German Empire. Under the AF regime, the Jews of France gradually lost their political rights, beginning with all Jews who had immigrated to France within the proceeding two years. The AF regime also revoked the 1870 Crémieux Decree, which had granted French citizenship to the Jews of Algeria. By 1941, all Jews in the French Empire, regardless of location, had been reduced to the status of third class subjects. The Jews of the French Empire were also economically impoverished by 1941, following a series of decrees which effectively banned Jews from participating in the French economy in any meaningful way. Jews were also placed under a regime of segregation not dissimilar to the CSA’s pre-Freedom Party treatment of its African-American population. By 1941, Jews throughout France were confined to ghettos; in 1940-1941, Maurras oversaw a campaign to expel the Jewish population from Paris. By 1941, Jews also made up a not insignificant proportion of the network of penal colonies established throughout the French Empire that were intended to supply forced labor as needed by local authorities. Some historians have speculated that had the Entente won the Second Great War, the Jews of the French Empire would have eventually faced an expulsion similar to the 1492 expulsion from Spain.

Maurras, during his time in power, also personally oversaw political campaigns directed against groups such as Protestants and Freemasons. Under AF, the French political left was also methodically crushed: membership in a labor union became grounds for forced labor by 1941.

Maurras did not particularly like Great Britain, but maintained the Anglo-French alliance directed against the German Empire. Maurras also maintained French military ties with the Russian Empire and the CSA. He envisioned France as the world’s leading great power after the final defeat of the Central Powers. Maurras was instrumental in persuading King Charles XI to wage war against the Germans, Austro-Hungarians, and the USA.

Charles Maurras was killed in the 1944 German superbombing of Paris.

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Maurice Pujo, as in our world, was the co-founder of Action Français and served as the leader of the AF’s youth organization, the Camelots du Roi. He was a loyal ally of Charles Maurras. Pujo was killed in the 1944 German superbombing of Paris.

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Philippe Pétain never recovered physically or emotionally from the French defeat at the Battle of Verdun during the First Great War. He was unceremoniously expelled from the French Army in 1917, and died in his sleep in 1921.

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Robert Brasillach doesn’t exist in TTL.

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The analogue to Marcel Petiot in TTL was Henri Petiot, born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. He was conscripted into the French Army in 1914, and killed in combat in the Western Front in 1915 during the First Great War.
As the saying goes, "Even evil has standards". Even Maurras thought that outright exterminating the Jews like what Russians were doing wherever they invaded, despite his visceral hatred of them, was going too far. Definitely something the books imply and users speculate. Even the Silvershirtists may have not even gone that far, even with Mosely's own antisemitism; they might've just sidelined them from society and done heavy intimidation (one specualtion) by force and coercion. By this post, Maurras wanted them to be "useful" before they were to be rid of. But as discussed on this thread and elsewhere, TL-191 could've been hellish if the the Entente won GW2 ITTL like if the Axis won IOTL. Expulsion from mainland France would've been one result, or perhaps an "extermination through labor" program along with other persecuted groups.
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Other than being the party co-founder and a chief ideologue, does Pujo serve in any prominent cabinet positions/government offices under the regime?
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Adding in another, does Brasillach's brother-in-law Maurice Bardèche exist and serve any role?
 
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As the saying goes, "Even evil has standards". Even Maurras thought that outright exterminating the Jews like what Russians were doing wherever they invaded, despite his visceral hatred of them. Definitely something the books imply and users speculate. Even Silvershirtist may have not even gone that far, even with Mosely's own antisemitism; they might've just sidelined them from society and done heavy intimidation (one specualtion) by force and coercion. By this post, Maurras wanted them to be "useful" before they were to be rid of. But as discussed on this thread and elsewhere, TL-191 could've been hellish if the the Entente won GW2 ITTL like of the Axis won IOTL. Expulsion from mainland France would've been one result, or perhaps an "extermination through labor" program along with other persecuted groups.
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Other than being the party co-founder and a chief ideologue, does Pujo serve in any prominent cabinet positions/government offices under the regime?
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Adding in another, does Brasillach's brother-in-law Maurice Bardèche exist and serve any role?

I tend to think that the end goal of the AF regime, had the Entente won the Second Great War, would have been the total expulsion of Jews from the French Empire, along the lines of the Spanish expulsion of 1492. In TTL, one of the long-term effects of the AF regime is that there are virtually no Jews living in France, or Algeria, by 2022.

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Pujo doesn’t really serve in any other prominent positions during the AF period.

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The analogue in TTL to Maurice Bardèche, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. As in our world, Bardèche had a career as a writer and journalist. He came to embrace the revanchist, far-right during the early post-First Great War period, and eventually card to support the AF regime. Bardèche rose to become the editor of several Parisian newspapers intended to promote the AF’s ideology. Bardèche was killed in the German superbomb attack on Paris in 1944.
 
Had to split Franch collaborators from the list so you could reply to it on its own.
France
--Joseph Barthélemy
--Pierre Bonny
--René Bousquet
--Robert Brasillach
--Marcel Bucard
--Paul Carbone (Does the French Connection become a bigger state-mafia collaborative project ITTL?)
--Alexis Carrel (Nobel Prize laureate in biology who led a eugenics/euthanasia program in tandem with the Nazis.)
--Jean Chiappe
--Francois Darlan
--Joseph Darnand
--Louis Darquier de Pellepoix
--Marcel Déat
--Eugène Deloncle
--Jacques Doriot
--Philippe Henriot
--Charles Hunztinger
--Henri Lafont
--Pierre Loutrel
--Charles Maurras (Most speculated to be PM during GW2 as Action Française co-founder and leader by fans and users. Is he in your head cannon?)
--Charles Nougès
--Maurice Papon
--Philippe Pétain
--Marcel Petiot (Infamous serial killer who's alleged to have helped dispose bodies for the SS and Vichy Regime. Does he have fully-employed role ITTL for the Actionists?)
--Pierre Pucheau
--Maurice Pujo (Action Française co-founder)
--Simon Sabiani
--François Spirito
--Xavier Vallat
--Maxime Weygand

*Edit: added a few people associated with the French Connection, a couple of cops, and a serial killer.

The analogue in TTL to Joseph Barthélemy, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. Barthélemy, like his counterpart from our world, eventually became a professor of law. Barthélemy was radicalized politically following the French defeat in the First Great War, and eventually came to support Action française. Although Barthélemy had started his professional career opposed to antisemitism, Barthélemy eventually played a key role in drawing up the AF regime’s antisemitic laws. He also played a key role in a semi-official planning committee which provided the regime with lists of recommendations for book bans.

Joseph Barthélemy was killed in the German superbomb attack on Paris in 1944.

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The analogue in TTL to Pierre Bonny, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. He was conscripted into the French Army during the First Great War, and was killed during the Battle of Verdun.


The analogue in TTL to Marcel Bucard, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. He volunteered for the French Army in 1914, with the outbreak of the First Great War. He died from dysentery while stationed on the Western Front in 1915.

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René Bousquet doesn’t exist in TTL.

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The analogue in TTL to Paul Carbone, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. As in our world, he eventually moved to Alexandria, Egypt as a teenager, where he became involved in criminal activity. In 1911, Carbone was murdered in Alexandria by several rival criminals.

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The analogue in TTL to Henri Lafont was Henri Chamberlin, born on a slightly different date in comparison to our world. Chamberlin lived as a criminal in Paris, uninvolved with political activity. He was killed in the German superbomb attack on Paris in 1944.
 
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Couple questions on South American border disputes:
The maps in the books and here show Bolivia still has the Gran Chaco region. In your head cannon, did Bolivia and Paraguay still go to war over this region ITTL? If not, how was it averted?
Similar thing with Perú and Ecuador: How was war averted so that Perú didn't get awarded the disputed territory in 1942? Do border disputes between the two last as long as IOTL?
As with Venezuela, they're still shown to have their present day borders on the maps for this thread. Do they have border disputes with the Empire of Brazil ITTL due to them inheriting Venezuela's disputed/claimed territory when they were awarded British Guyana? Have tension reached a heightened point? Or was an agreement reached so that Venezuela ended up renouncing their claims on Guyana?
 
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Now for a head cannon question for you: Do you personally recognize JEB Stuart Jr. ITTL as being the same real-life figure of OTL and Turtledove making a mistake and going along with it without correction? Or do you see him as a fictional character and have an in-universe explanation? I personally see it as the former. Either way, his birth should not be affected at all by the POD. I do note a similar thing with Emperor Pedro IV of Brazil (OTL's Prince Pedro Gastão) you have here in this and corrected the one Turtledove has for TTL, whom would actually be Pedro III (OTL's Crown Prince Pedro de Alcântara, Duke of Grão-Pará). So I believe there'd be a case for my question.
 
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On a related note, does your Pedro IV live as long, if not, longer than IOTL? I figured he'd be an analogue since his mother was a Czech woman of minor nobility whom his father had met while in exile.
 
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Couple questions on South American border disputes:
The maps in the books and here show Bolivia still has the Gran Chaco region. In your head cannon, did Bolivia and Paraguay still go to war over this region ITTL? If not, how was it averted?
I have thought about this issue a lot. The different maps out there regarding the borders and countries for the world of TL-191 don't make it easy to determine though, especially since we don't really get a lot of information on these countries. Some maps do show Bolivia clearly getting the Chaco region, while others have Paraguay getting the Chaco or at least half of it (hard to tell with some of the qualities of the maps).

Either way, I do believe that the issue over the Chaco Region will not go away for these two countries. Both of them are going to want this region and both of them will have to settle the dispute one way or another - through diplomacy or war. Even with the changes in this timeline post Great War, I personally don't see the issue over the Chaco just being butterflied away. Bolivia and Paraguay are both landlocked countries in South America as well as being two of its poorer nations. Bolivia has been yearning for any kind of access to the sea - formally owning the Chaco region gives the country access one of South America's major rivers (The Paraguay River) that does lead to the sea, and thus more effective trade with the outside world and a route to economic prosperity. Paraguay, having lost much of its land and people through devastating wars, would be adamant on holding the Chaco region for itself, to preserve its national integrity, to hold land that would give it more effective control of the Paraguay River, and thus a means to gain trade with the outside world. The potential to exploit the discovery of oil in the Chaco is also something that would drive these two countries to claim the Chaco.

Another reason why I think the issue over the Chaco will still be around is that the power dynamics in South America have changed with regards to some of its more powerful countries - Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. Chile, Paraguay, and Brazil all went to war on the side of the Central Powers in the the Great War and won. Chile and Paraguay in particular fought a land war with Argentina. Post-war, the rivalry and animosity between Chile and Argentina is still very alive. Any border dispute between its neighbors is a potential opportunity to gain influence in the region and gain allies in for any coming war. So as Bolivia and Paraguay press their claims over the Chaco, Chile and Argentina might step in to support any one of these nations.

Another reason why I think the Chaco would still be a problem is because the dispute was already a long running issue between the two countries. Clashes and disputes over the Chaco dated as far back as the 1880s and skirmishes between Bolivian and Paraguayan patrols in the area were already threatening to flare up into a full blown war by the 1920s in our timeline. The reason it didn't was because both countries felt they did not have sufficient weapons or a sufficient army in the 20s to go to war with.

In this timeline, with no League of Nations and the USA focusing inward to deal with losses from the Great War and deal with the Great Depression, along with contending with a resurgent Confederacy under Featherston, international calls from the wider world to cease hostilities may be small to non-existent... unless countries from Europe want to really get involved, which will be hard to guess. Personally, I see this potential dispute being handled primarily by the South American nations themselves. Paraguay, having taken part in the Great War coming out victorious, still might have to content with a very unstable political environment on top of carefully preserving its small population that has surely experienced losses from its war with Argentina. Provided that events in this timeline don't change much for Bolivia, it is likely the country will still want to claim the Chaco.

How this dispute gets resolved is a bit tricky though and could happen a number of ways. Turtledove not mentioning the Chaco dispute may be down to him just overlooking the thing entirely and forgetting to write something for it or that a war never happened - I lean more on the side that says the dispute was occurring and that war was possible.

One way that it might get resolved however is through peaceful negotiation. In this case Brazil might act as a neutral arbiter rather than Argentina (given that Argentina is more clearly aligned with the Entente, though Brazil being neutral arbiter isn't exactly ideal). The Chaco might be partitioned equally between the two nations, which gives both of them equal access to the Paraguay river. Clear navigation rights on the river for Bolivia would have the be hammered out to guarantee that both nations may use the river equally.

Another way this gets resolved is, of course, through war. When this war will happen might depend on a few factors. One of the reasons each country did go to war was that both felt they were ready wage war once they had built up their weapons stockpiles. Paraguay in this timeline may have an advantage here - taking part in the Great War means that their army has already gained experience in battle and they may already have fairly sizable stockpile of weapons built up thanks to potential support from the Central Powers - getting guns from the US, Germany, and Brazil. If the skirmishes in the Chaco in the 1920s flare up into a war, Paraguay may feel more confident in its ability to wage war compared to Bolivia. Pressing their initiative and chances the Paraguayans gain the advantage in the skirmishes in the Chaco and push out Bolivian patrols more effectively, thus giving them better control of the region. These skirmishes might well flare up into a war, but perhaps Bolivia might be more pragmatic to back down after failing to gain progress. The Chaco War may occur, but might also be a far shorter, far less bloody affair that goes in Paraguay's favor. Chile and Argentina meanwhile may choose to support a side in this dispute, but since Bolivia may be willing to back down earlier neither power is able to really influence the course of events. For a longer peace between the two countries the resulting treaty would again have to allow both nations to get equal navigation rights on the Paraguay River for a chance at economic growth. This scenario does depend on whether or not Bolivia feels it is ready to go to war and assumes that Paraguay feels it can go to war and takes the initiative, given its experiences in the Great War.

Yet another scenario is a full-blown war between the two countries, just like in our timeline, with a few factors being changed around. This one I feel is the worst case scenario, because it has potential to turn into a bloody proxy war between Argentina and Chile, given their sympathies to their respective factions.

I'd comment more in this last scenario, but it might be too long and may get a bit weird with who starts supporting who. Perhaps others may have their own take on it. I have my own.
 
How is the relationship between the Eastern European EC nations that used to be a part of the Russian Empire prior to the FGW (especially Ukraine and Belarus) and Russia by 2021?

In 2021, diplomatic relations between the Russian Republic and the Kingdom of Ukraine and the Kingdom of Belarus at best might be considered polite. But it’s a strained politeness. There are bitter memories in both Belarus and Ukraine of the atrocities committed during the SGW by Tsarist forces. There are also a not-insignificant number of Russians who believe that Belarus and Ukraine should be brought into the Russian Republic, although no Russian political leader is prepared to attempt an armed conflict against Belarus and Ukraine, since that would also mean war against the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the German Empire.
Asked this above question around a year ago and got this answer from David.

Man OTL as really taken an interesting turn.
 
Couple questions on South American border disputes:
The maps in the books and here show Bolivia still has the Gran Chaco region. In your head cannon, did Bolivia and Paraguay still go to war over this region ITTL? If not, how was it averted?
Similar thing with Perú and Ecuador: How was war averted so that Perú didn't get awarded the disputed territory in 1942? Do border disputes between the two last as long as IOTL?
As with Venezuela, they're still shown to have their present day borders on the maps for this thread. Do they have border disputes with the Empire of Brazil ITTL due to them inheriting Venezuela's disputed/claimed territory when they were awarded British Guyana? Have tension reached a heightened point? Or was an agreement reached so that Venezuela ended up renouncing their claims on Guyana?

I don’t know if an analogue to the Chaco War of OTL took place in TTL prior to the Second Great War. If such a conflict did occur, it’s possible that it would be more destructive compared to our world if both sides were getting more outside help in comparison to our world (Chile and Brazil assisting Paraguay and Argentina assisting Bolivia). If an analogue to the Chaco War was averted, it may have been through more extensive diplomacy by the Empire of Brazil, the region’s most powerful military force.

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Ultimately a major war between Peru and Ecuador was averted in TTL because Ecuador joined the CDS following the end of the Second Great War. Ecuador was among the first CDS member states to request a permanent US military presence through the new alliance, beginning in the 1950s. The post-SGW governments of Peru, and Peru’s military ally Brazil, were not interested in a potential war against the USA.

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The post-SGW governments of Venezuela would have liked to acquire former British Guiana, but were not interested in challenging the Brazilians for this territory. Postwar Venezuela was a military ally of Brazil, not least because of the fear caused by the postwar US expansion in the Caribbean.
 
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Now for a head cannon question for you: Do you personally recognize JEB Stuart Jr. ITTL as being the same real-life figure of OTL and Turtledove making a mistake and going along with it without correction? Or do you see him as a fictional character and have an in-universe explanation? I personally see it as the former. Either way, his birth should not be affected at all by the POD. I do note a similar thing with Emperor Pedro IV of Brazil you have here in this and corrected the one Turtledove has for TTL, whom would actually be Pedro III (OTL's Crown Prince Pedro de Alcântara, Duke of Grão-Pará). So I believe there'd be a case for my question.

I’m assuming that the Jeb Stuart Jr. shown in the TL-191 series is an analogue to his OTL counterpart of the same name.
 
On a related note, does your Pedro IV live as long, if not, longer than IOTL? I figured he'd be an analogue since his mother was a Czech woman of minor nobility whom his father had met while in exile.

An analogue to Pedro IV in our world could live longer than in our world, but I’m not sure of any exact dates.
 
I have thought about this issue a lot. The different maps out there regarding the borders and countries for the world of TL-191 don't make it easy to determine though, especially since we don't really get a lot of information on these countries. Some maps do show Bolivia clearly getting the Chaco region, while others have Paraguay getting the Chaco or at least half of it (hard to tell with some of the qualities of the maps).

Either way, I do believe that the issue over the Chaco Region will not go away for these two countries. Both of them are going to want this region and both of them will have to settle the dispute one way or another - through diplomacy or war. Even with the changes in this timeline post Great War, I personally don't see the issue over the Chaco just being butterflied away. Bolivia and Paraguay are both landlocked countries in South America as well as being two of its poorer nations. Bolivia has been yearning for any kind of access to the sea - formally owning the Chaco region gives the country access one of South America's major rivers (The Paraguay River) that does lead to the sea, and thus more effective trade with the outside world and a route to economic prosperity. Paraguay, having lost much of its land and people through devastating wars, would be adamant on holding the Chaco region for itself, to preserve its national integrity, to hold land that would give it more effective control of the Paraguay River, and thus a means to gain trade with the outside world. The potential to exploit the discovery of oil in the Chaco is also something that would drive these two countries to claim the Chaco.

Another reason why I think the issue over the Chaco will still be around is that the power dynamics in South America have changed with regards to some of its more powerful countries - Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. Chile, Paraguay, and Brazil all went to war on the side of the Central Powers in the the Great War and won. Chile and Paraguay in particular fought a land war with Argentina. Post-war, the rivalry and animosity between Chile and Argentina is still very alive. Any border dispute between its neighbors is a potential opportunity to gain influence in the region and gain allies in for any coming war. So as Bolivia and Paraguay press their claims over the Chaco, Chile and Argentina might step in to support any one of these nations.

Another reason why I think the Chaco would still be a problem is because the dispute was already a long running issue between the two countries. Clashes and disputes over the Chaco dated as far back as the 1880s and skirmishes between Bolivian and Paraguayan patrols in the area were already threatening to flare up into a full blown war by the 1920s in our timeline. The reason it didn't was because both countries felt they did not have sufficient weapons or a sufficient army in the 20s to go to war with.

In this timeline, with no League of Nations and the USA focusing inward to deal with losses from the Great War and deal with the Great Depression, along with contending with a resurgent Confederacy under Featherston, international calls from the wider world to cease hostilities may be small to non-existent... unless countries from Europe want to really get involved, which will be hard to guess. Personally, I see this potential dispute being handled primarily by the South American nations themselves. Paraguay, having taken part in the Great War coming out victorious, still might have to content with a very unstable political environment on top of carefully preserving its small population that has surely experienced losses from its war with Argentina. Provided that events in this timeline don't change much for Bolivia, it is likely the country will still want to claim the Chaco.

How this dispute gets resolved is a bit tricky though and could happen a number of ways. Turtledove not mentioning the Chaco dispute may be down to him just overlooking the thing entirely and forgetting to write something for it or that a war never happened - I lean more on the side that says the dispute was occurring and that war was possible.

One way that it might get resolved however is through peaceful negotiation. In this case Brazil might act as a neutral arbiter rather than Argentina (given that Argentina is more clearly aligned with the Entente, though Brazil being neutral arbiter isn't exactly ideal). The Chaco might be partitioned equally between the two nations, which gives both of them equal access to the Paraguay river. Clear navigation rights on the river for Bolivia would have the be hammered out to guarantee that both nations may use the river equally.

Another way this gets resolved is, of course, through war. When this war will happen might depend on a few factors. One of the reasons each country did go to war was that both felt they were ready wage war once they had built up their weapons stockpiles. Paraguay in this timeline may have an advantage here - taking part in the Great War means that their army has already gained experience in battle and they may already have fairly sizable stockpile of weapons built up thanks to potential support from the Central Powers - getting guns from the US, Germany, and Brazil. If the skirmishes in the Chaco in the 1920s flare up into a war, Paraguay may feel more confident in its ability to wage war compared to Bolivia. Pressing their initiative and chances the Paraguayans gain the advantage in the skirmishes in the Chaco and push out Bolivian patrols more effectively, thus giving them better control of the region. These skirmishes might well flare up into a war, but perhaps Bolivia might be more pragmatic to back down after failing to gain progress. The Chaco War may occur, but might also be a far shorter, far less bloody affair that goes in Paraguay's favor. Chile and Argentina meanwhile may choose to support a side in this dispute, but since Bolivia may be willing to back down earlier neither power is able to really influence the course of events. For a longer peace between the two countries the resulting treaty would again have to allow both nations to get equal navigation rights on the Paraguay River for a chance at economic growth. This scenario does depend on whether or not Bolivia feels it is ready to go to war and assumes that Paraguay feels it can go to war and takes the initiative, given its experiences in the Great War.

Yet another scenario is a full-blown war between the two countries, just like in our timeline, with a few factors being changed around. This one I feel is the worst case scenario, because it has potential to turn into a bloody proxy war between Argentina and Chile, given their sympathies to their respective factions.

I'd comment more in this last scenario, but it might be too long and may get a bit weird with who starts supporting who. Perhaps others may have their own take on it. I have my own.

This is an excellent examination of how the territorial disputes between Bolivia and Paraguay from our world could play out in TTL, including how the region’s major military powers might respond to such a conflict.
 
This is an excellent examination of how the territorial disputes between Bolivia and Paraguay from our world could play out in TTL, including how the region’s major military powers might respond to such a conflict.
Thanks. Considering Chile and Argentina are bitter rivals of a sort in this world, a war so close to their borders would interest them. Likewise, the outcome of this war may not affect the world, but it would have an impact on the region going forward, especially if other South American powers decide to get involved, shaping power dynamics in South America.
 
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