TL-191: After the End

What happened to Alec Pomeroy?
This is the write-up that I did for Alec Pomeroy.

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Alec Pomeroy did not have a happy life. He was the only survivor of the US Army’s assault on his family’s diner in Rosenfeld, Manitoba in 1943 during the Second Canadian Uprising. He was six years old.

For Pomeroy’s new Bureau of Protective Serivces guardians, returning him to his only living family was out of the question, given the MacGregor-Pomeroy family history and the ongoing wartime emergency in Occupied Canada; his grandmother in Rosenfeld passed away from natural causes in 1944. Instead, he was sent to an orphanage in Dakota for two years, until the Bureau of Protective Services decided that what was needed for him was a life of military discipline; Pomeroy spent the next ten years at the Rock Island Military Academy, Rock Island, Illinois.

As though being the only Canadian in a TL-191 American military academy was not hard enough, he also had to deal with the scorn that came from being the son of a widely hated terrorist. The reputation of the MacGregor family was still poisonous enough in 1954 to deny the 18-year-old Rock Island graduate admission to an officer’s training course, or any Army position that required any kind of technical education. The authorities were also fearful that Pomeroy could not be trusted on occupation duty in the former CSA, much less in the remainder of Occupied Canada.

At least Fiji had pleasant weather, even if he never had a chance of being promoted any higher than Private Second Class.

At a certain point in his Rock Island education, Pomeroy decided that he wanted nothing to do with his lost family, yet never really found acceptance or a real sense of identity anywhere else. Throughout the rest of his life Pomeroy preferred to keep to himself, including during the Fourth Pacific War, where he served in Australia and West Papua in the Illinois National Guard, through three failed marriages, and through a thirty year career standing behind the counter at the Roosevelt Newstand-Cafe in Deerfield, Illinois, Pomeroy remained extremely introverted.

The only real hobby that he had consisted of frequent trips to the movies.

He died in 2002.

Pomeroy’s three failed marriages resulted in five children: two with his first wife, who was an Australian war bride, two with his second wife, who was a librarian who he met in a small town in Iowa during the only vacation that he took in his thirty years of work at the Newstand-Cafe, and one with his third wife, who the president of the local Historical Society. Altogether Alec Pomeroy has twenty one grandchildren and three great-grandchildren as of 2009, none of whom care to know anything about the former MacGregor-Pomeroy family.
 
What happened to the following people:
Samuel Longstreet
Hugo Black
John Nance Garner
Boris Lavochkin
John Redmond
W. T. Cosgrave
Georges Remi (aka Herge)
Harold Wilson
James Callaghan
Walter Winterbottom
Kenneth Aston
Ted Drake

Ted Drake’s analogue in TTL was Joseph Drake, born in Southampton on a slightly different date. Joseph Drake also had a football career, but with Tottenham Hotspur FC, instead of Arsenal. Drake’s professional football career was cut short by the outbreak of the Second Great War in 1941, after which he volunteered for service with the Royal Air Force. He was killed in combat on the Western Front in 1943.

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Kenneth Aston’s analogue in TTL was George Aston, born on a slightly different date. As with our world’s Kenneth Aston, George Aston qualified to be a football referee in the 1930s. In 1941, with the outbreak of the SGW, Aston volunteered for service, and served with the Royal Artillery on the Western Front. After the end of the SGW, Aston accepted an Australian offer of recruitment and resettlement. Aston served in the Australian military, before retiring in 1964. During the Fourth Pacific War, Aston headed the local Civil Guard detachment in the City of Liverpool, in New South Wales; the Civil Guard were civilian volunteers not unlike the OTL British Home Guard. Aston spent the rest of his life in Liverpool.

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Walter Winterbottom’s analogue in TTL, of the same name, was born on a slightly different date. Winterbottoman, in the grim economic, political, and social environment of the United Kingdom that followed the First Great War, never became a professional football player, remaining a teacher. Winterbottom in TTL did not have the spinal disease that ended his playing career in our world.

During the Second Great War, Winterbottom served in the Royal Air Force. He was shot down on the Western Front in 1942; he survived, though injured, and was taken prisoner by the Germans. Winterbottom was released with other POWs in 1944, only to return to an utterly devastated country. Winterbottom emigrated to New Zealand, where he served as an instructor in the postwar New Zealand Air Force. After retiring from the New Zealand military in 1971, Winterbottom spent the rest of his life in Wellington.
 
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This is the write-up that I did for Alec Pomeroy.

-

Alec Pomeroy did not have a happy life. He was the only survivor of the US Army’s assault on his family’s diner in Rosenfeld, Manitoba in 1943 during the Second Canadian Uprising. He was six years old.

For Pomeroy’s new Bureau of Protective Serivces guardians, returning him to his only living family was out of the question, given the MacGregor-Pomeroy family history and the ongoing wartime emergency in Occupied Canada; his grandmother in Rosenfeld passed away from natural causes in 1944. Instead, he was sent to an orphanage in Dakota for two years, until the Bureau of Protective Services decided that what was needed for him was a life of military discipline; Pomeroy spent the next ten years at the Rock Island Military Academy, Rock Island, Illinois.

As though being the only Canadian in a TL-191 American military academy was not hard enough, he also had to deal with the scorn that came from being the son of a widely hated terrorist. The reputation of the MacGregor family was still poisonous enough in 1954 to deny the 18-year-old Rock Island graduate admission to an officer’s training course, or any Army position that required any kind of technical education. The authorities were also fearful that Pomeroy could not be trusted on occupation duty in the former CSA, much less in the remainder of Occupied Canada.

At least Fiji had pleasant weather, even if he never had a chance of being promoted any higher than Private Second Class.

At a certain point in his Rock Island education, Pomeroy decided that he wanted nothing to do with his lost family, yet never really found acceptance or a real sense of identity anywhere else. Throughout the rest of his life Pomeroy preferred to keep to himself, including during the Fourth Pacific War, where he served in Australia and West Papua in the Illinois National Guard, through three failed marriages, and through a thirty year career standing behind the counter at the Roosevelt Newstand-Cafe in Deerfield, Illinois, Pomeroy remained extremely introverted.

The only real hobby that he had consisted of frequent trips to the movies.

He died in 2002.

Pomeroy’s three failed marriages resulted in five children: two with his first wife, who was an Australian war bride, two with his second wife, who was a librarian who he met in a small town in Iowa during the only vacation that he took in his thirty years of work at the Newstand-Cafe, and one with his third wife, who the president of the local Historical Society. Altogether Alec Pomeroy has twenty one grandchildren and three great-grandchildren as of 2009, none of whom care to know anything about the former MacGregor-Pomeroy family.
The Bureau of Protective Services clearly didn't do a very good job protecting him...unfortunate coincidence, negligence, or possibly dereliction of duty?

On an unrelated note, I imagine that the likes of Arsenal, Chelsea, Tottenham and West Ham are still playing catch-up to clubs from the Midlands and the North.
 
The Bureau of Protective Services clearly didn't do a very good job protecting him...unfortunate coincidence, negligence, or possibly dereliction of duty?

On an unrelated note, I imagine that the likes of Arsenal, Chelsea, Tottenham and West Ham are still playing catch-up to clubs from the Midlands and the North.

The Bureau of Protective Services had a bad reputation in TTL for its incompetence, corruption, and, as it turned out, a culture of indifference for those placed in its care. It was abolished during the Humphrey administration in 1964, after a series of devastating revelations published in several newspapers.

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The major London football teams had to be rebuilt almost entirely in TTL after the German superbomb attack on the city. In 2021, the major London have only started to challenge the postwar dominance of teams from other regions of the country.
 
Please forgive me if this has been answered, but did Jonathan Moss ever re-settle and attempt to start a family again?
 
How about J R R Tolkein ?

JRR Tolkien did not have a happy life in TTL.

Tolkien served in the British Army during the First Great War, on the Western Front. He survived the war, only to return to a Britain shattered politically, economically, and socially by defeat in the conflict.

Tolkien managed to start an academic career at Oxford, where he developed what became a lifelong friendship with CS Lewis. However, his life would be irrevocably changed with the ascent of the Conservative-Silver Shirt Coalition in the early 1930s. Tolkien, being a religious Roman Catholic with German ancestry, and as someone who specialized in the study of the Germanic languages, gained the negative attention of the authorities, for all that he was uninvolved in organized political activity.

Tolkien did manage to write and publish a fantasy and adventure story, The Hobbit, which was published in 1936 in TTL, with a broadly similar plot and cast of characters. However, this version of the story, with slight differences compared to our world, would not be explicitly tied into a larger fantasy setting during Tolkien’s lifetime.

In 1938, Tolkien resigned from his teaching position and emigrated with his family to New Zealand. This was prompted by the increasingly strident anti-Catholic themes that had started to permeate government propaganda, as part of a general propaganda campaign by the government against Ireland. Tolkien was followed into exile by his friend, CS Lewis, who left out of loyalty to his friend and due to his own dislike of the regime.

Tolkien and Lewis would remain close friends during the remainder of their lives in New Zealand, even though they disagreed on a number of points concerning religion and writing. In Lewis’s international bestselling Mercenary saga, published in the 1950s, the character of Derrydol, an anthropomorphic river otter mercenary who is the best friend to the mercenary fox Scorpius, is said to have been based partially on Tolkien.

In New Zealand, Tolkien wrote and had published a single epic fantasy work: The Fall of Numenor, detailing the downfall of a mighty island civilization and empire, at the hands of its increasingly cruel and tyrannical kings and the insidious corruption brought about by a captured dark lord. The story is thought by students of Tolkien’s work to be allegorical to the fall of the British Empire after the two Great Wars, although Tolkien himself disliked that kind of allegorical writing. The Fall of Numenor was published to critical acclaim in Australia and New Zealand, but would not be published in the United States until the 1980s. US audiences generally did not respond to the political, moral, and philosophical aspects of The Fall of Numenor, but were said to have responded positively to Tolkien’s elaborate descriptions of Numenor’s steam powered technology.

Tolkien was driven into despair upon learning of the German superbombings of London, Brighton, and Norwich, as well as learning of the Destruction. While he continued to write, none of his projects were completed to his satisfaction at the time of his death in 1973.

One of Tolkien’s children, Christopher Tolkien (a different person to our world’s Christopher Tolkien) would take upon himself the task of editing and getting published the two manuscripts that his father had completed as sequels to The Fall of Numenor: The Last Alliance, detailing the immediate fate of the survivors of Numenor who landed on the continent of Middle Earth, and The Third Age, detailing the rise and gradual decline of the exile kingdoms of Gondor and Arnor.

Tolkien’s grandchildren continued the work of writing and publishing stories set in their grandfather’s fantastic world, based on his extensive notes and letters, but also increasingly willing to allow “the tale to grow in telling.” Since the publication of The Last Alliance and The Third Age, several other additions to the Tolkien family’s saga have been published: The First Age (essentially an ATL version of The Silmarllion); The Three Lines (an epic saga of an alternate version of Rohan); The Restoration (an alternate version of The Lord of the Rings, and specifically, The Return of the King, with an ATL version of Aragorn as the protagonist); The Blue Wizards (set in an ATL version of the far east of Arda, with its magical protagonists initially trying to undermine the dark lord’s power in the region, only to fall themselves). More volumes in the saga are expected to be published later in TTL’s 2020s.

This alternate version of Tolkien’s Legendarium has some significant differences compared to our world, in its setting and content. For one, the Elves and Dwarves are shown to be at the height of their power in TTL’s saga, rather than fading as in our world’s version. The technological level of several of the civilizations, including the ATL versions of Gondor and Arnor, are shown to have steam powered technology, even as gunpowder weaponry has yet to spread. In TTL, the events of The Hobbit were not explicitly tied into the same setting as The Fall of Numenor, although the Shire is mentioned in passing in The Third Age. This meant that a plot similar to the OTL saga centered around the Ring of Power and the War of the Ring doesn’t exist in TTL, though enchanted jewels, which bring their wearers great power and wisdom, are present throughout the series.
 
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JRR Tolkien did not have a happy life in TTL.

Tolkien served in the British Army during the First Great War, on the Western Front. He survived the war, only to return to a Britain shattered politically, economically, and socially by defeat in the conflict.

Tolkien managed to start an academic career at Oxford, where he developed what became a lifelong friendship with CS Lewis. However, his life would be irrevocably changed with the ascent of the Conservative-Silver Shirt Coalition in the early 1930s. Tolkien, being a religious Roman Catholic with German ancestry, and as someone who specialized in the study of the Germanic languages, gained the negative attention of the authorities, for all that he was uninvolved in organized political activity.

Tolkien did manage to write and publish a fantasy and adventure story, The Hobbit, which was published in 1936 in TTL, with a broadly similar plot and cast of characters. However, this version of the story, with slight differences compared to our world, would not be explicitly tied into a larger fantasy setting during Tolkien’s lifetime.

In 1938, Tolkien resigned from his teaching position and emigrated with his family to New Zealand. This was prompted by the increasingly strident anti-Catholic themes that had started to permeate government propaganda, as part of a general propaganda campaign by the government against Ireland. Tolkien was followed into exile by his friend, CS Lewis, who left out of loyalty to his friend and due to his own dislike of the regime.

Tolkien and Lewis would remain close friends during the remainder of their lives in New Zealand, even though they disagreed on a number of points concerning religion and writing. In Lewis’s international bestselling Mercenary saga, published in the 1950s, the character of Derrydol, an anthropomorphic river otter mercenary who is the best friend to the mercenary fox Scorpius, is said to have been based partially on Tolkien.

In New Zealand, Tolkien wrote and had published a single epic fantasy work: The Fall of Numenor, detailing the downfall of a mighty island civilization and empire, at the hands of its increasingly cruel and tyrannical kings and the insidious corruption brought about by a captured dark lord. The story is thought by students of Tolkien’s work to be allegorical to the fall of the British Empire after the two Great Wars, although Tolkien himself disliked that kind of allegorical writing. The Fall of Numenor was published to critical acclaim in Australia and New Zealand, but would not be published in the United States until the 1980s. US audiences generally did not respond to the political, moral, and philosophical aspects of The Fall of Numenor, but were said to have responded positively to Tolkien’s elaborate descriptions of Numenor’s steam powered technology.

Tolkien was driven into despair upon learning of the German superbombings of London, Brighton, and Norwich, as well as learning of the Destruction. While he continued to write, none of his projects were completed to his satisfaction at the time of his death in 1973.

One of Tolkien’s children, Christopher Tolkien (a different person to our world’s Christopher Tolkien) would take upon himself the task of editing and getting published the two manuscripts that his father had completed as sequels to The Fall of Numenor: The Last Alliance, detailing the immediate fate of the survivors of Numenor who landed on the continent of Middle Earth, and The Third Age, detailing the rise and gradual decline of the exile kingdoms of Gondor and Arnor.

Tolkien’s grandchildren continued the work of writing and publishing stories set in their grandfather’s fantastic world, based on his extensive notes and letters, but also increasingly willing to allow “the tale to grow in telling.” Since the publication of The Last Alliance and The Third Age, several other additions to the Tolkien family’s saga have been published: The First Age (essentially an ATL version of The Silmarllion); The Three Lines (an epic saga of an alternate version of Rohan); The Restoration (an alternate version of The Lord of the Rings, and specifically, The Return of the King, with an ATL version of Aragorn as the protagonist); The Blue Wizards (set in an ATL version of the far east of Arda, with its magical protagonists initially trying to undermine the dark lord’s power in the region, only to fall themselves). More volumes in the saga are expected to be published later in TTL’s 2020s.

This alternate version of Tolkien’s Legendarium has some significant differences compared to our world, in its setting and content. For one, the Elves and Dwarves are shown to be at the height of their power in TTL’s saga, rather than fading as in our world’s version. The technological level of several of the civilizations, including the ATL versions of Gondor and Arnor, are shown to have steam powered technology, even as gunpowder weaponry has yet to spread. In TTL, the events of The Hobbit were not explicitly tied into the same setting as The Fall of Numenor, although the Shire is mentioned in passing in The Third Age. This meant that a plot similar to the OTL saga centered around the Ring of Power and the War of the Ring doesn’t exist in TTL, though enchanted jewels, which bring their wearers great power and wisdom, are present throughout the series.
2 related questions.how was his worked received in Britain and what does Peter Jackson exist ittl ?
 
Even though rock and roll doesn't exist ITTL, do the genres that make and relate to rock gain some mainstream, or underground, or regional popularity? What is the closest TTL genre to that? Tinpan, which is the Northern variety of jazz, has mainstream popularity while Southern jazz is seen as strange by their Northern counterparts. Does country music have popularity among rural folks both North and South despite its Southern origins? Elsewhere in jazz, does big band and swing music become popular as well? What would Glenn Miller be doing ITTL?

What about blues and R&B? Is there still some underground/regional popularity even after the Destruction? Anything close to soul or something influenced along the lines of gospel music? Does the electric guitar become a mainstream instrument?

Though Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Judy Collins, the Kingston Trio, and Joan Baez won't exist ITTL, is there still an American folk revival? If so, is bent more on German sounding folk songs or is it still rooted in British and Appalachian folk? Also what would Pete Seeger and Burl Ives be doing ITTL?

Do we see anything like reggae, rocksteady, or ska coming out of Jamaica? Mento-punk is mentioned as being more folk oriented and I'm inclined to think the aforementioned genres are more influenced by upbeat folk music.
 
Please forgive me if this has been answered, but did Jonathan Moss ever re-settle and attempt to start a family again?

Jonathan Moss eventually retired from practicing law, under a generous military pension. He elected to move as far away from both the former CSA and Canada as he could, and eventually chose San Diego. He spent the rest of his life writing his memoirs, which would be published, under the title of Few Remain, in 1963, and proved to be an immediate bestseller.

Moss never recovered from the loss of his family, and never remarried. He died in 1967, on the eve of the Fourth Pacific War, before the great flight of civilians from San Diego into the interior.

Few Remain would be adapted successfully as a film duology, released in 1998 and 1999. Moss’s memoir also inspired the epic American Fantasy Air War series, by Mary O’Sullivan, and published between 1999 and 2007. The romantic tragedy at the heart of the series is taken directly from that of Jonathan Moss and Laura Secord.
 
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