These Fair Shores: The Commonwealth of New England

Politics of the United States of America
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When all is said and done, and if it isn't too much effort (and I know that it will involve extensive effort), I'd love to see an infobox detailing the Anglo-American conflict in it's entirety. What a fascinating universe you've crafted here, I just want to know everything!

This is absolutely a plan of mine!!! It would take some time, but never know what Summer 2023 can bring!!

Is the ATL FIA as astonishingly corrupt as our own? :p

At least there don't seem to be as many races held in authoritarian petrostates as in OTL.

It absolutely is! Nothing much changes there, haha!

It’s interesting to see the shift in rhetoric regarding America in these articles. Particularly this bit. “The turn away from American-style bombastic political presentation aimed at impressing a party boss“. I might be reading too much into it, but that way of speaking of American politics almost seems to be normalizing it. Or at the very least, pulling away hard from the original line of Hogan being a blood thirsty totalitarian.

I also thought it was interesting how few Commonwealth troops are now deployed in the Caribbean. I’m not sure if that means Hogan has conceded the loss of the Caribbean states, or if Britain is cutting them loose. I guess we’ll have to see.

What happened to the remaining Americans on Cuba?

The rhetoric shift is very much noted by those who are reading the BBC. It is an intentional act on the BBC's style department, as it's always tightly controlled.

The Americans on Cuba... Well... o_O
 
This sounds like a much more Marxist-Leninist-esque system than the US was previously described, given that it still had stuff like Standard Oil around in the past. Did the United States undergo some kind of economic shift following its recent civil war and conflict with the British?
 
This sounds like a much more Marxist-Leninist-esque system than the US was previously described, given that it still had stuff like Standard Oil around in the past. Did the United States undergo some kind of economic shift following its recent civil war and conflict with the British?
A bunch of stuff has happened during the US's history ITTL.
 
A bunch of stuff has happened during the US's history ITTL.
Right, but I think Standard Oil was mentioned as a thing that still existed by the present day ITTL. Looking back on some previous posts, it looks like the US gradually took control of its monopolies and had recently liberalized, creating this weird mix of centralized planning and state ownership alongside Gilded Age-esque capitalism, but I could be wrong on that. Either way, it’s a whacky system, and I dig it.
 
Interesting, I didn't realize that the United States being a quasi-leftist state. I assume that this is taking major inspiration from Myanmar.

Any inspiration from Myanmar is purely coincidental, the United States was developed by several people and we collectively never looked at Myanmar.

Cool beans.
I'm hate to bother you, but it's been over 18 months since you teased the first two presidents on Page 2. So, have you made any progress? I'm not trying to pester you. I'm just asking since it's related to this.

There has been some progress made on it, but I am currently engrossed in another large project for this timeline.

It'll be worth the wait, plus the war is still playing out and there is plenty more to see before you get there I'm sure! Great work as always on the last graphic too!

Thank you!!

This sounds like a much more Marxist-Leninist-esque system than the US was previously described, given that it still had stuff like Standard Oil around in the past. Did the United States undergo some kind of economic shift following its recent civil war and conflict with the British?
Right, but I think Standard Oil was mentioned as a thing that still existed by the present day ITTL. Looking back on some previous posts, it looks like the US gradually took control of its monopolies and had recently liberalized, creating this weird mix of centralized planning and state ownership alongside Gilded Age-esque capitalism, but I could be wrong on that. Either way, it’s a whacky system, and I dig it.

Standard Oil does exist. Those companies were never actually dissolved - the Office of American Policy was formed under Chairman Smith and it took personal ownership of these companies into Smith (the person), and he allowed the Government (The Office of American Policy) to dictate how the companies were run. They were never fully owned, much like how you could purchase 51% of a company's stock and have a controlling stake. The economic policies of Smith were ones in which the original owners were allowed to maintain their private holdings that had been seized years prior to co-opt them into the system. There is a parallel system of sorts going on here. Parts of the economy are liberalised (but under heavy state regulations and controls), while other parts are fully owned by the Government. The Office of American Policy is the closest thing you can get to a central planning ministry, the First Controller essentially controls the American economy. It is no coincidence that this is Hogan's second listed office.

This system has no actual analogue irl, because of how it was formed and the unique American aspects of Hamiltonism.

Ne Win era Myanmar in particular.
I wonder if there's any ITL allegory to the Rohingya expulsion in the United States

There is not.
 
Really cool work as always!!!

In one of the BBC articles about the French elections, a story on the side bar says there is a “real threat” of impeachment for the Californian president. What is that process like and more specifically, what happens if she is impeached? In the Californian election post, it did not appear that there was any sort of Vice President post. Is there a line of succession to the presidency? Would a new election be held?
 
It doesn't matter how batshit crazy any alternate history timeline gets,

Ferrari will always remain.

It's remarkable, given how much of Ferrari's history was shaped by chance, as it began as a racing-focused spin-off of Alfa Romeo (similar to today's relationship between Alpine and Renault) and its logo was borrowed from that a World War I pilot, whose mother Enzo Ferrari knew. Without Ferrari, Alfa Romeo might've remained dominant, Maserati could've taken over or, with an earlier POD, Ettore Bugatti could've chosen to found his company in his native Milan rather than in Alsace-Lorraine.

Another POD might concern international racing colours, with the different geopolitical situation of this TL, different such colours could've been assigned - Italy was originally assigned black, with red being the United States' colour. But the best Formula One-related POD ever would be the survival of Minardi, with its relentlessly informal and uncorporate character surviving as well. :p
 
[snip]

Another POD might concern international racing colours, with the different geopolitical situation of this TL, different such colours could've been assigned - Italy was originally assigned black, with red being the United States' colour. But the best Formula One-related POD ever would be the survival of Minardi, with its relentlessly informal and uncorporate character surviving as well. :p
...or Ayrton Senna 🥲
 
Speaking about motorsports, I would be really intrigued about the state of stock car racing/NASCAR in TFS-verse. I assume because Prohibition didn't happen in this timeline, stock car racing doesn't take off?

On one hand, Indy might be king in the USA, on the other hand, considering the rather peculiar state the US are in, I wouldn't be surprised if the most distinctive form of North American racing came out of California or Canada instead - my money's on California. :p

By the way @CosmicAsh, how are Italy, Sardinia and the Two Sicilies doing, compared to OTL's peninsula?
 
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