These Fair Shores: The Commonwealth of New England


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After some much needed time away from both content creation and resolving other matters I was dealing with, I am now pleased and excited to, nearly three years after the first thread was started, to inaugurate the new thread for the ever-expansive timeline I have created on this forum.

Astute followers will know that
Our Fair Country had been shut down near the start of 2020. At this junction, I can affirmatively say that updates for that timeline shall never be posted again, and it shall exist on its own from now on. Those who are on the Our Fair Community discord server have known for some time that Our Fair Country was being revived, in a sense, for some time now. That is the purpose of this thread, and this new timeline. These Fair Shores will be the "spiritual successor," so to speak, for the original universe of Our Fair Country. This is not a simple re-hash and retcon of the old timeline. I have been busy working behind the scenes and determining new paths, new history, and new graphics to be posted. Very little from the old timeline will be immediately re-used, and yes, I have many, many articles, news updates, and wikiboxes in the waiting. This timeline shall, and I do hope ought to be, everything I had originally envisioned for Our Fair Country, except removing many of the areas I had problems with, fixing lore and outcomes that I was no longer happy with, and ensuring that I can dive further and further into the bits and pieces of lore and all the countries in this universe.

So, to everyone who had followed along with Our Fair Country, I invite you to stick around and follow along on this new thread as I work to advance this series, and this universe. I do hope, and intend, that the first update of this series will be the article on New England's 2018 General Election.

And, as always, I am always happy to answer your questions! :closedeyesmile:
 
In these dark days before Christmas, I lifted up my eyes to heaven, and prayed that @CosmicAsh start a new TL –and lo and behold, for what I see is true! My eyes are graced with a sight that I shalln't eschew. Oh, how I must give thanks for my life to persue on this fair TL of New England! So I shall sit here while I look upon this TL, on this fair TL of New England!
 
@CosmicAsh would you mind telling me what you used to make the graph for the opinion polling data? I've tried looking for a method to do as much that's less tedious than simply drawing it by hand, but I haven't had much luck.
 
No Jeb! in cabinet
A downgrade in every way from the last timeline. For real though, brilliant way to kick things off! Plenty of little details to speculate from throughout the article, and even a cameo from Vermin Supreme. Wonderful stuff.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Amazing work as always :love: you really do knock it out of the park everytime.

Love the little details throughout the article, so just a couple of comments:
1. I can see that both Australia and New Zealand have removed the Union Flag, given how cosely tied the flag debates are to republicanism IOTL I wonder is this means different constitutional arrangements to OTL... Also the New Zealand PM response seemed quite... dismissive... I'm quite surprised by that but interested with where you are going.

2. "United States Privy Council Chirman Larry Hogan"... does this mean what I think it means...
 
Incredible!

Thank you!! :closedeyesmile:

@CosmicAsh would you mind telling me what you used to make the graph for the opinion polling data? I've tried looking for a method to do as much that's less tedious than simply drawing it by hand, but I haven't had much luck.

I did it all in Google Sheets, with my own tweaking and modifications done in Illustrator. Sorry, the only real quick way is to generate a data set and use R (<-- link) to create the ones you see on Wikipedia. There's a steep learning curve, and I plain and simple didn't feel like going through the process of doing it all for this election, when I could make something that was 85% of what I wanted in ~20 minutes instead of working with R for ~2 hours.

A downgrade in every way from the last timeline. For real though, brilliant way to kick things off! Plenty of little details to speculate from throughout the article, and even a cameo from Vermin Supreme. Wonderful stuff.

Former Prime Minister John Bush would like a word with you :p

I see Australia removed the Union jack?

Indeed they have, it was a relatively recent change, done via referendum.

Amazing work as always :love: you really do knock it out of the park everytime.

Love the little details throughout the article, so just a couple of comments:
1. I can see that both Australia and New Zealand have removed the Union Flag, given how cosely tied the flag debates are to republicanism IOTL I wonder is this means different constitutional arrangements to OTL... Also the New Zealand PM response seemed quite... dismissive... I'm quite surprised by that but interested with where you are going.

2. "United States Privy Council Chirman Larry Hogan"... does this mean what I think it means...

Thank you so much! I am hoping that this new iteration of the timeline will meet this expectation every time.

1) Indeed they have. I will note that the removal of the Union Flag from the national flag does not have the same connotation. That being said, neither New Zealand or Australia have a full legal separation from the United Kingdom, nor do they have as an extensive history of Anglo colonisation, instead their populations being far less white than we know of them (stemming from continued British focus on North America, and a more benign neglect of the Oceanic territories). Only New Zealand retains a strong, and active, republican force, but the House of Commons (in London) is unlikely to approve of such a measure, no matter its popular support.

2) *ahem*

As Adopted (1798):

Privy Council of the United States
  • Executive of Foreign Affairs, Executive of the Treasury, Executive of War, Executive of Navy appointed by House of Representatives
  • President of the United States may appoint other members to assist governance
    • Confirmed by the Senate
    • Includes Deputy Executives
  • Advises and exercises the federal executive’s powers
  • All ex-Presidents retain their membership on the Privy Council
  • Declarations of War and Treaties must be approved by the Privy Council
  • All sitting governors are members of the Privy Council
  • The Privy Council alone has the power to veto bills from Congress (Bicameral House of Representatives and Senate).

As Amended (2020):

Privy Council of the United States
  • Executive of Foreign Affairs, Executive of the Treasury, Executive of War, Executive of Navy, Executive of the Air Force appointed by House of Representatives
    • No term expiration on these appointees
  • President of the United States may appoint fifteen Privy Councillors upon the start of their term, to last until the expiration of their term.
  • Advises and exercises the federal executive’s powers
  • All ex-Presidents retain their membership on the Privy Council
  • Declarations of War and Treaties must be approved by the Privy Council
  • All sitting governors are members of the Privy Council
  • Each State Government may appoint two Privy Councillors (Some states appoint, others elect)
    • No term expiration on the two appointed.
  • The Privy Council alone has the power to veto bills from Congress (Unicameral House of Representatives).
  • All Privy Councillors must retire upon reaching the age of 75 (does not apply to the President of the United States)
  • The Privy Council appoints the Chairman of the Privy Council, who acts as the Vice-Executive of the United States, and advises and consents the President on the function of Government.

Excuse me as I mop up all this drool.

You ain't seen nothing, yet :)
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor

Thanks for answering, fascinating stuff as always.

Looking forward to seeing a more multiracial Oceania ITTL, and a much tighter Commonwealth with what appears to be more legislative oversight from London.

The Privy Council of the United States is fascinating, and I'm looking forward to learning about the alternate constitutional arrangements and evolution of TTL's United States.

Keep it up :D
 
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