The Yankee Dominion: A Map and World Building Project

List of political parties of St. John's Island

Naturalist Party: The Naturalist Party is a green liberal party affiliated with the federal Green Party although they share some party policies with the Progressive Party. They absorbed their parent liberal party in the early 1970s and have since been the main party of the left. Historically they were the party of farmers although with a surge of young voters they are an urban hipster party in part.

Federalist Party: The traditional party of the right in St. John's, they have more often than not, been in opposition. Ideologically they are on the moderate side of the national Federalist's political positions.
 
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Hey @Oryxslayer I was thinking maybe Brazil could still keep the colonies of Portugal (minus Mozambique) but they act more like OTL Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands with the U.S. As in, they are basically independent countries who act independently, but Brazil provides defense, funding grants etc, and the nations can live in Brazil without a visa or citizenship.

Something like this?

Yeah, if Portugal gets kicked out of Europe, and the crown flees to Brazil, it seems natural Brazil assumes 'protection' of the Portuguese colonies.
 


THE KINGDOM OF BRAZIL
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CAPITAL: Rio de Janeiro
MONARCH: HRH Dom Duarte Pio
FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Unitary Constitutional Monarchy

Brazil has always been a power player in the Latin American stage. The Braganzas, forced to flee from Portugal while it was being invaded, have made Brazil the de-facto Portugal in Exile. The monarchy has, however, made it very strong and stable. They often use the South Atlantic to show off their military might, which makes their neighbors nervous. They support both the Commonwealth and Germany, and has democratized since the 60's. However, King Pio still has a lot of executive power. Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo both have boomed, becoming centers for business and tourism. Overall, many people think Brazil will become the world's new Superpower.

REPUBLIC OF CABO VERDE
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CAPITAL: Praia
PRIME MINISTER: Ulisses Correia e Silva
FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Federal Constitutional Republic


STATE OF GUINEA-BISSAU

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CAPITAL: Bissau
PRESIDENT: José Mário Vaz
FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Unitary presidental republic

KINGDOM OF BENGUELA AND THE ISLES OF SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE
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CAPITAL: Benguela
KING: HRH Dom Luiz of Benguela-Braganza
PRIME MINISTER: Isaías Samakuva
FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Constitutional Monarchy

The states in association are independent, but Brazil basically acts as protector. These states are pawns for Brazil to maintain power in the South Atlantic. Most of these states are forgettable, although Benguela has been ruled by a cadet branch of the House of Braganza. Many people in the international community say that Brazil 'still practices colonialism' although they deny that is colonial purposes that these states are in association. Life is pretty good for the citizens of these states, and Brazil does send a generous amount of money for infrastructure in these regions. Thus, many people in these states say that Brazil shouldn't change how these countries are governed.
 
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A little break from Maps, don't worry, I am presently working on the west coast.


The Taishō Era is a period in Japanese History coinciding with the reign of Emperor Taishō (1912-1926), however is accepted by historians to end in early 1930s. The end of the Imperialist War in 1915 led to many of the Taishō Eras defining problems: economic uncertainty, post-war malaise, shifting foreign relations, and political upheavals. The era is considered to be a turning point in Japanese history, distinguished from the National Projects of industrialization and militarization during the Meiji Era and the general political balance that defined the Showa Era.

On July 30, 1912, the Meiji Emperor died and Crown Prince Yoshihito succeeded to the throne as Emporer of Japan. He inherited a nation embroiled in a devastating war in Siberia, and a financial system burdened with the debts acquired during Japan’s rapid industrialization. The Japanese political system of the late Meiji system was untenable: a cabal of Military and political elites ruled the country via a privy council Junta, and the Japanese parliament promised by the Meiji constitution was a powerless and sidelined body. One of Meiji’s last decisions was to declare over the heads of the Junta that the National Revancist Project would be complete with the defeat of Russia, and that the various rights and parliamentary powers long promised would finally be realized upon the war’s completion.

Taishō inherited a political vacuum that several powers sought to fill. While the first election in 1916 (not under Universal Male suffrage) returned Rikken Seiyūkai, the Junta enabling party, to power, subsequent elections and political crisis gave rise to four distinguished yet often overlapping factions. The big question that they all sought to solve was what happens after Revanchism is complete? All factions considered themselves Nationalist, but interpreted their loyalty to the Emperor in very different ways. This loyalty enabled all factions to make moves that were technically illegal, yet claim they were acting out of duty to the Emperor.

- The Junta of political conservatives and Army elites. Following the Junta’s dissolution in 1924, the Army took over its political position. The faction favored a continuation of Meiji policies economically, but favored a defensive outlook when concerning Japanese foreign policy. The Army saw a resurgent Russia as Japan’s greatest threat, and favored a military strategy that fortified Japanese territory won in East and Northern Asia. Prominent members considered themselves Conservatives or Monarchists.

- The Navy. High ranking naval officers did possess membership on the Junta, but lacked the influence appropriate from that position. Naval officers were often sidelined by the Privy council, giving rise to the interservice rivalry. The navy strongly differed with the Army over everything local from democracy (Armies German training vs the Navies British Schooling) to economic policies (Farmer subsidies and Mainland investments vs Liberal Zaibatsu Alliances). Crucially, the Navy saw rising German power in Southeast Asia as Japans greatest threat rather than Russia. Naval theory favored buildups and alliances with other SEAsian powers to prepare for the day when war with Germany was available. Most members considered themselves Conservatives.

- Rikken Sakura, the political alliance that came to dominate the Japanese Parliament. They choose the Cherry Blossom as a symbol of awakening. Their platform called for a peaceful “Taisho Restoration” on par with the Meiji Restoration. This transformation would empower the Emperor over his controlling privy council, and then further reform parliament to act as a that place of deliberation and consultation. Parliament would need to be accountable to the people, so Sakura made universal male suffrage and political reform it’s two key policy proposals. Further proposals aligned with Reformist ideas about welfare and Keynesian economics, but these were secondary to structural reform. The party would quickly overcome institutional disadvantages and become an electoral juggernaut, winning parliamentary majorities and merging with other Liberal parties, on the back of a cross-class coalition desire for their vague promise of “change.” Party members aligned with Liberals, Social Liberals, and Social Democrats. Sakura joined enthusiastically with the Right in opposition to Socialist and Communist insurrection.

- The Pan-Asianists, a political player without an institution captured like the other three but instead had the ear of the heir, Hirohito. The Pan-Asianist tent included a loose association of Intellectuals, Zaibatsu, and immigrants to Japan’s colonies. They saw Japan as a natural launching point to assist fellow Asians in their struggle against Western Imperialism. Of course, the tent was a loose collection of forces: The Zaibatsu wanted more economic puppets to exploit, while the intellectuals saw the mission as a truly noble one. The faction crossed the political aisle.


Institutional capture meant that Japanese politics could never be organized around normal political competition. Politics instead structured itself as a government-by-removal. Institutional Purges, Assassinations, and exile to Frontier Positions all were tools leveraged by the political factions against their opponents.


The Events of March 1924 and their consequences are considered a Crucial turning point in Japanese History

Timeline of Key Events

1915: End to hostilities with Russia.

1916: First election with enhanced, but still limited powers awarded to the Parliament.

1916: First Post-war budget. Fiscal austerity programs of almost every government branch, except the land army.

1917: Formation of Rikken Sakura in response to the continued domination of the Privy council Junta.

1919: Intervention in China at the behest of Manchu Emperor Pu Yi. Supported by almost all parts of Japanese society, the Kwangtung invasion of Beijing occurred with little loss off life. Budget crunches however left the new government without much assistance from her friends in Tokyo, further destabilizing the peripheral regions of the North.

1920: Japan supports Sternburg’s government in Mongolia.

1921: Rikken Sakura minority Government.

1921: Fiscal crunch of postwar debts leads to unemployment and fiscal uncertainty. Public distrust of Junta grows, Sakura blames army.

1922: Harmony Acts become law. The laws make it illegal to be a member of a Communist or Socialist group, or any association that calls for an end to the Imperial Regime.

1923: Pacific Naval Treaty. UK, Germany, Japan, and America agree to maintain a 1:1:2:4 ratio of naval tonnage. Seen as an insult from the west, particularly by the Japanese Navy.

1923: Toranomon Incident. Junta responds with a crackdown on Left-Wing Groups, and re-empowers the Tokkō internal police to their wartime power levels.

1924: Rikken Sakura majority Government.

1924: March Incidents. The Assassination of the Rikken Sakura PM by a (supposedly) Junta aligned group, and their subsequent weak punishment sends both the party and the people into the streets. The Army junta coerces a statement from Taisho disbanding Parliament under the Harmony Acts, banning Sakura, and calling new elections. However, Naval Admirals on the Junta also have knowledge of the crackdown. While the Kempeitai were securing the Parliamentary building and arresting Sakurists, naval marines secured the Imperial palace. Taisho was placed before a radio and proclaimed his disapproval of the coup, and the Army commanders behind it. Tokko and Naval officers initiate their own coup, rounding up prominent Army commanders and freeing the parliament, with minimal casualties.

1924: Reorganization of government. Navy takes control of the Privy Council, though with more positions now available for parliamentary officials. Full purge of Army.

1924: Port Arthur incident. Subsequent killings of Chinese and Manchus weaken the fragile Beijing govt and provide fodder for Sakura to run a military audit.

1925: Universal Male Suffrage enacted. Subsequent elections give Rikken Sakura a renewed majority.

1925: British-Japanese non-aggression pact, aimed at mutual fears of Germany.

1925: End of Pu Yi’s rule over northern China. Sakura and the Pan-Asian parties blame the lack of naval support for the Kwangtung Army on the loss of access.

1926: Death of Taisho and empowerment of Emperor Hirohito. The Showa emperor purges most naval officers from the privy council, giving positions to prominent Pan-Asian thinkers and MPs, and a returning several generals to the table. Unintentionally favors Sakura.

1927: Enfeeblement of the privy council. Rikken Sakura follow through on their promise of a second Meiji restoration. They strip the council of most powers, transforming it into a personal advisory board. Parliament becomes the official law-making body, with new seats created for military appointees – to fill the role once held by military council members. The Emperor still retains total final say, and intervention powers, like under the old Meiji Constitution.

1927: Mass Purge. Sakura brings prominent military commanders from both the Navy and Army to court over crimes real, perception driven, and fabricated. Aligns other (now weakened) factions in support of the Pan-Asianists against Sakura.

1928: Mass Mongol raid on Manchuria. Sakura sends money and men to the Kwangtung Army, and opposes Sternburg – to the opposition of the conservatives who backed the Mongol regime and saw these raids as acceptable losses. Kwangtung takes the money and turns once again towards China.

1928: Rikken Sakura lose majority. With electoral reform accomplished, voters turn to other, more relevant parties. Sakura still forms government with assistance of Social Democratic and Social Liberal parties, making many think Sakura is against Imperial stability.

1930: Kwangtung Army instigates the Tianjin Incident to intervene once again in China. Sakura wants to punish the disobedient generals, the Army and Pan-Asianist support the move. Almost becomes a constitutional crisis, before Hirohito intervenes in favor of generals. Entrenches parliamentary politics into two opposing camps: a Conservative and Pan-Asian militaristic faction, and Social Liberal defensive oriented faction presided over by the declining Rikken Sakura.

Probable Change Coming
 
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Also @Oryxslayer I was wondering what would happen to the Raj. I think it would be safe to say that Afghanistan and Burma would probably be independent. However, would the rest of India be balkanized, unified, or somewhere in between?

This is what I have for Indochina however:

Thailand: Has been under the control of a nationalist military junta/the emperor. It is an autocracy, and people are at the boiling point because of it's byzantine corruption, human rights abuses, etc.

Former German Indochina: Fairly democratic, some states have been under dictatorships in the past. Friendly with Germany. Viet Nam owns the paracel islands.

Hainan: Happy doing it's own thing, and Haikou and Sanya are booming due to trade.

Malaysia: basically like OTL, except more land.

Singapore: also like OTL
 
Also @Oryxslayer I was wondering what would happen to the Raj. I think it would be safe to say that Afghanistan and Burma would probably be independent. However, would the rest of India be balkanized, unified, or somewhere in between?

This is what I have for Indochina however:

Thailand: Has been under the control of a nationalist military junta/the emperor. It is an autocracy, and people are at the boiling point because of it's byzantine corruption, human rights abuses, etc.

Former German Indochina: Fairly democratic, some states have been under dictatorships in the past. Friendly with Germany. Viet Nam owns the paracel islands.

Hainan: Happy doing it's own thing, and Haikou and Sanya are booming due to trade.

Malaysia: basically like OTL, except more land.

Singapore: also like OTL
Lets go one at a time:

Thai: Fine

Ger-Indo: Good, but would Laos even exist - its was part of Siam originally since France didn't want to exert rule past the mountains. And if it does exist, would the borders be the same as OTL, or would there be more in flux on the Thai side?

Hainan: Fine

Malay: No Sarawak, I think that is clearly heading in its own direction. Instead, more of the OTL non-Thai Kra. Might be just called Malaya then.

Sing: Yeah. An interesting thing might be that I left Malacca as a Dutch exclave/treaty port earlier on surrounded by the UK. Federation of Singapore and Malacca?

India: This is another region that I have been thinking about for a while, ever since I read a few historical pieces on state development policies of Asian nations. My thoughts were the UK wants to get ahead of the separatist movements like they did in America, so hands down a Monarch for the Raj (with only true powers being diplomatic and militaristic) and a weak Parliament. However this provokes more resentment and fails to solve the issue - White man over Indian subjects, and something like the INC dominates the Parliament alongside other Princes. Somewhere along the lines, a rebellious Prince (maybe Nizam of Hyderabad, or Singh of Punjab) kicks out the British King to much jubilation and makes himself the Titular Monarch. The UK will be kinda fine with this, they still control the Monarch by treaty, and still have trade/foreign policy/final veto control over the nations policy.

From there its a case of as the British pull out, who do they hand powers back to - Parliament or Monarch? Of course there are other tensions: tensions between historic lands of Princes and the new Indian Nation, tensions between a Popular monarch and a divided congress, tensions between Hindu majority who dominates Parliament and other Minorities on throne, a generally socialist outlook for INC-thingy vs Right-Leaning monarch, etc. Eventually, there is coup with the backing of UK/America, and the Monarch Assumes royalist control.

And that is just early India - Democracy is a British institution so you bet it will be back, and what happens when the Monarch dies? Gandhi and other protesters are still around - do they support the new authoritarian regime or turn towards the populist fight for democracy?

But this is all the product of asking the question of what India might look like if it goes in a direction more resembling OTL Malaysia/S. Korea/Taiwan rather then her OTL path. Perhaps India becomes King of the East Asia Tiger (with China out of the picture) rather then a county who just now is industrializing and still has problems with things like Sanitation and Infrastructure.
 
Lets go one at a time:

Thai: Fine

Ger-Indo: Good, but would Laos even exist - its was part of Siam originally since France didn't want to exert rule past the mountains. And if it does exist, would the borders be the same as OTL, or would there be more in flux on the Thai side?
I'll just say the Germans wanted to expand, and have more control over the Mekong perhaps. Perhaps the Thais invade, or they make it a puppet.

Malay: No Sarawak, I think that is clearly heading in its own direction. Instead, more of the OTL non-Thai Kra. Might be just called Malaya then.
Sarawak is not a part of it (should've made that clearer).

Sing: Yeah. An interesting thing might be that I left Malacca as a Dutch exclave/treaty port earlier on surrounded by the UK. Federation of Singapore and Malacca?
I like that idea.

India: This is another region that I have been thinking about for a while, ever since I read a few historical pieces on state development policies of Asian nations. My thoughts were the UK wants to get ahead of the separatist movements like they did in America, so hands down a Monarch for the Raj (with only true powers being diplomatic and militaristic) and a weak Parliament. However this provokes more resentment and fails to solve the issue - White man over Indian subjects, and something like the INC dominates the Parliament alongside other Princes. Somewhere along the lines, a rebellious Prince (maybe Nizam of Hyderabad, or Singh of Punjab) kicks out the British King to much jubilation and makes himself the Titular Monarch. The UK will be kinda fine with this, they still control the Monarch by treaty, and still have trade/foreign policy/final veto control over the nations policy.

From there its a case of as the British pull out, who do they hand powers back to - Parliament or Monarch? Of course there are other tensions: tensions between historic lands of Princes and the new Indian Nation, tensions between a Popular monarch and a divided congress, tensions between Hindu majority who dominates Parliament and other Minorities on throne, a generally socialist outlook for INC-thingy vs Right-Leaning monarch, etc. Eventually, there is coup with the backing of UK/America, and the Monarch Assumes royalist control.

And that is just early India - Democracy is a British institution so you bet it will be back, and what happens when the Monarch dies? Gandhi and other protesters are still around - do they support the new authoritarian regime or turn towards the populist fight for democracy?

But this is all the product of asking the question of what India might look like if it goes in a direction more resembling OTL Malaysia/S. Korea/Taiwan rather then her OTL path. Perhaps India becomes King of the East Asia Tiger (with China out of the picture) rather then a county who just now is industrializing and still has problems with things like Sanitation and Infrastructure.
Like those ideas
I'm going to go with the Nizam, since Singh's line died out. I feel like Ghandi and friends would be in support of the fight for democracy, since that just seems like the path he would take.

I would say I like the idea of India being more industrialized. India is gigantic, and it definitely would be a superpower if it has industrialized. The Asian Tigers thing, I don't think so. I would just say it's an industrialized superpower who is friendly to the West.


On another note, I was thinking about H.K, and I'm gonna scrap that idea of capitalist dystopia. It would be like OTL Hong Kong, except independent. I'm not sure what to do about Shanghai though. Probably will be the same as H.K, perhaps take its place as a S.A.R.
 
Just popping in to say that I'm still as interested as ever in this project, I just don't have the time currently to really contribute much of anything. Fortunately, this timeline has continued perfectly on auto-pilot and I'd like to continue that way. You guys have created an ATL world that extends beyond the wildest dreams I had when I launched this project. Keep on keeping on, and keep up the fantastic work!
 
Just popping in to say that I'm still as interested as ever in this project, I just don't have the time currently to really contribute much of anything. Fortunately, this timeline has continued perfectly on auto-pilot and I'd like to continue that way. You guys have created an ATL world that extends beyond the wildest dreams I had when I launched this project. Keep on keeping on, and keep up the fantastic work!
Ohai, it's been a few months.
 
Franklin Provincial Election Map
@Zyxoriv, here is a Franklin map with 150 seats.



Couple comments on this one. First, There are so many islands that I had to add red guidelines for what goes where, along with the blue waterlines for the insert waterways. Might want to remove or adjust these later after assigning seats. Secondly, to the topic of the map itself. In treated waterways and mountains as barriers more important than jurisdiction lines in some cases, trying to avoid cutting them when possible. This resulted in a few weird seats, Belllingham and Olympia both were cut in two by rivers rather than united as one. However, it generally worked out fine - not seat really crosses Puget - something both Canada and the US in OTL are guily of. The only seats that kinda do this are the two island based ones: A seat analogous to Saanich North and Islands, and a Seat based out of San Juan and Island counties Islands. This state is also incredibly urbanized: a hair under 50% of the seats are just inside the two inserts - not counting the many other metros like Everett or Victoria, and less than 20% of the seats can be generously termed "Rural".

edit: Fixed 1 seat
 
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As you can tell, Iim a little confused about whether we are dealing with States, or Provinces, or Commonwealths, or something else. I called them states, but I have since started calling them provinces.

There are 109 seats, and towns are only cut if they are sufficiently over the deviation limit.
 
yo uhh did you know tommy thompson, former governor of wisconsin and former secretary of health and human services', brother ran for governor of wisconsin as a libertarian in 2002 and won 10% of the vote and two counties

Edit: Edited it.
 
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Oh, and here is Oregon for whomever requested that one. 98 Seats. 42 seats are inside the insert. Similar to Franklin, I tried to avoid cutting the two major geographic features: the Willamette River and the Cascade Mountains.

 
@Zyxoriv I was thinking about Minnesota, and I already told you that I wanted to add the Deutschpartei into their system. So it wouldn't be the Trump-style right-wing populist party, it would be the American Heritage-like agrarian trad-con party, like in other states.

I'm gonna do Manitoba soon.

I think it was @Wolfram.

And is Swansea TTLs Portland?
 
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