The world of Flints War books

In Eric Flints two books so far The Rivers of War https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1812:_The_Rivers_of_War and the Arkansas War https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1824:_The_Arkansas_War a different outcome of the War of 1812 leads to the so called Five Civilized tribes voulntarily leaving the southeastern US before the forced removal of something like the Trail of Tears with their power and wealh intact. They form an independent country in what id OTL Arkansas and Oklahoma- the Confederacy of the Arkansas which includes a large number of free blacks and some whites. The country comes into open conflict with the US in the Arkansas War.So how do you see history in this timeline panning out since at this point Flint has not written another book in the series ?
Arkansas_Army_Flag.jpg
 
Last edited:
I read the books a while ago, so I don't recall every detail. But I would have loved a sequel since the second book pretty much ends up in a cliffhanger as the US declares war on Arkansas.
if I am not mistaken, it is very much implied that the war won't end well for Arkansas (i.e. the US will likely end up occupying Arkansas, and probably annexing it ) but it will become a very hard pill to swallow.
There is also the matter of the political re-alignment due Clay's election and significant anti-war and anti-Clay sentiment in other factions. The democratic oposition includes a lot of southerners who have, for the time being, allied with abolitionists to get rid of Clay first. As hopefull as the ending of the book seams, I do not think this alliance will last.
Another interesting topic the book does not touch-up is what will end up happening in Texas. It is still likely recieving American settlers. And trouble will brew between them and Mexico. So even if Arkansas survives the war, it will end up surrounded by the US and a US friendly Texas (if it is not annexed).
 
I had an idea similar to it about a similar setup happening in Florida under William Augustus Bowles and the Muskogee.

 
I really hope these books continue at some point.It would seem they are not super popular with some if not most in AH circles at least partially because of the type of people they cast as the good guys.Disappointing but not surprising.
Assuming the Confederacy of Arkasa manages to survive as an independent nation there is lots of room for it to expand into the West which would be very interesting to see.If the Confederacy and the USA survived as seperate nations into the 20th century do they become allies,rivials or outright enemies perhaps supporting ifferent sides in European alliances which leads to a conflict being fought in North America ?
 
According to the author’s website he is writing the third book right now. The working title is 1828: Louisiana Burning.

And the first two books are scheduled for republication by Baen during 2022..

I am really looking forward to this!

 
According to the author’s website he is writing the third book right now. The working title is 1828: Louisiana Burning.

And the first two books are scheduled for republication by Baen during 2022..

I am really looking forward to this!


Awesome news-thank you :)

Looks like it is still a while away; mid-late 2023 most likely judging from the other projects listed before it. Nevertheless, this is good news.
 
According to the author’s website he is writing the third book right now. The working title is 1828: Louisiana Burning.

And the first two books are scheduled for republication by Baen during 2022..

I am really looking forward to this!


Yup - the main reason the series stalled was Baen signed Flint to an exclusive contract.

They finally got the rights to the series from Del Rey, and are happily letting Flint continue it.
 
I loved both books and reread them every couple of years. (Sam Houston is a lifelong personal hero of mine). At the end of the last book, while the Americans were likely to grind down Arkansas (coming in around the flanks via OTL future Kansas City and south to Joplin into OTL Fayetteville and Fort Smith it looks like) the problem is that large numbers of volunteers are coming out of the Northern states to fight alongside Arkansas (joining people like John Brown who are already present), while the Southern states are raising volunteer regiments. It seems likely that the a generation early Civil War is in the offing, and even states like Kentucky and Tennessee are heavily divided compared even to their heavily divided status in 1861. A really big mess indeed
 
I loved both books and reread them every couple of years. (Sam Houston is a lifelong personal hero of mine). At the end of the last book, while the Americans were likely to grind down Arkansas (coming in around the flanks via OTL future Kansas City and south to Joplin into OTL Fayetteville and Fort Smith it looks like) the problem is that large numbers of volunteers are coming out of the Northern states to fight alongside Arkansas (joining people like John Brown who are already present), while the Southern states are raising volunteer regiments. It seems likely that the a generation early Civil War is in the offing, and even states like Kentucky and Tennessee are heavily divided compared even to their heavily divided status in 1861. A really big mess indeed
It is a big mess but it is it a bigger mess?At the time there were probably far more Southerners on the ground who thought like Andrew Jackson and Sam Houston than John Calhoun and Jefferson Davis.There would be a fight but perhaps not as bitter or long lasting.Also unless its thoroughly defeated the presence of Arkansas will make for a much better outcome you would think...
 
So if the third book is going to be called 1828: Louisiana Burning (working title), can we assume the war is in its fourth year.
 
Top