The Thrice Crowned King - A Trastámara TL

Great update. I like Eleanor and I'm glad she's getting along well with Fernando and his family. Also Elizabeth of York lives! Margaret of Angouleme would be a great queen of France but I don't want Louise to succeed with her plan.
 
Great update. I like Eleanor and I'm glad she's getting along well with Fernando and his family.
She is warming up to them for sure. King Ferdinand is not quite as terrifying to her anymore.
Also Elizabeth of York lives!
She does! See, I am kind at times! Think of this as my penance for killing her as a toddler in my Burgundian story. And her surviving is gonna help Henry 7 and 8 as well.
Margaret of Angouleme would be a great queen of France but I don't want Louise to succeed with her plan.
Marguerite would be a great queen of France, wouldn't she. But Anne of Brittany would rather eat glass than see that scenario come true. And I'm intrigued by Sibylle of Bavaria becoming queen as a imperial proxy. Not sure who Marguerite would wed in this scenario thou.
 
Does Gaston of Foix still exist? They could elope and give Louise an aneurysm.
Gaston and Germaine is living in Spain as a close friend of Prince Fernando, so then running off together is not very likely as they are in the opposite side of the Pyrenees. But that would be a crack scenario.
Wow, this is great! Keep up the good work! A few questions though: where is Christopher Columbus? Shouldn’t he have discovered the Americas by now?
Thank you so much! I'm so happy to read this. Columbus is off doing God knows what right now and he did discover the Americas as otl in 1492.
 
Gaston and Germaine is living in Spain as a close friend of Prince Fernando, so then running off together is not very likely as they are in the opposite side of the Pyrenees. But that would be a crack scenario.

Thank you so much! I'm so happy to read this. Columbus is off doing God knows what right now and he did discover the Americas as otl in 1492.
So do you plan to address how the Americas impact Europe?
 
I'm glad that Fernando and Isabel at least have the sense to be kind to Eleanor. The poor girl's had a hard enough time. A longer-living Elizabeth of York is certainly going to nip a lot of Henry VII and VIII's dysfunction in the bud. A living Edmund Tudor will help out a lot too. As for France...I'm on Team Anne of Brittany. No offense Marguerite, you'd at least be a far better Queen than your brother was as King.
 
I'm glad that Fernando and Isabel at least have the sense to be kind to Eleanor. The poor girl's had a hard enough time.
They certainly will be kind to Eleanor, as she is their daughter in law.
A longer-living Elizabeth of York is certainly going to nip a lot of Henry VII and VIII's dysfunction in the bud. A living Edmund Tudor will help out a lot too.
Yes, the gloom and doom is gonna be removed from the Tudor court and things are gonna be more happy in England.
As for France...I'm on Team Anne of Brittany. No offense Marguerite, you'd at least be a far better Queen than your brother was as King.
I'm on team Anne as well. And Marguerite would be a great queen of France.
 
Chapter 9 - 1503 to 1505
Part 3 – Rey de Navarra

Chapter 9 – 1503 to 1505



Fernando and Eleanor left the city of Seville on the 9th of January. Their journey would take them from the southern region to the other side of Castile in the Northen side of the realm, a long one. To Córdoba, then across the Mierra Morena, to Yepes and Ocana in New Castile until they reached Alcalá de Henares. It would take the couple near two months until they arrived in the Archiepiscopal Palace that was the place of Fernando’s birth 18 years ago. Eleanor was faint with fatigue at this point and immediately took to her chambers, much to the court’s concern. While her state was attributed to the harsh weathers they had endured during their long travel, some historical sources believed that the young queen might have suffered an early miscarriage at this point. This has been supported by a letter found in Germaine of Foix’s possessions decades later that “my cousin had begun to suspect it, but she had not yet told the prince”. Nothing indicates that Fernando knew of her possible condition, but they stayed for near three weeks in the Madrid area before their journey continued to Torrelaguna and then towards Almazán. Ten weeks after their journey begun, Navarre received their new monarchs in the middle of March. Fernando and Eleanor entered the city of Olite in a grand ceremony accompanied by several hundred men at arms, noble lords and ladies and bishops all dressed in their best fineries. While many in Navarre had been mutinous over being absorbed into Spain, the death of Queen Catherine and her sons had left their cause without a figurehead. Only a handful of supporters still called for the return of the former king John III, but as he himself had no claim to the kingdom, nearly all had come to accept Eleanor as the indisputable and rightful heir to Navarre. Prince Fernando was not as fearsome as his father and his diligent sternness was a good indication for his future reign. An active and strong monarch would almost certainly keep order in the kingdom and keep the dreaded civil wars from encroaching once more. Eleanor herself was more of a cypher. The Queen was more introspective and pious, but she was no longer a sombre twelve-year-old girl that had left Pamplona after the Christmas of 1499. Eleanor would never have the domineering personality of her famous mother-in-law, but she would prove to be less passive than believed. Fernando was no stranger to ruling in unison with a spouse, after all his own parents had coined the phrase Tanto Monta, Monta Tanto to decree that they amounted to the same in ruling. Their joint coronation took place after the easter celebrations of April in the Pamplona cathedral and several days of feastings, dancing and other celebrations followed. Fernando’s right to the throne was not solely to be hold as King Jure Uxoris, but due to legitimate inheritance from John II of Aragon and Navarre, husband to Queen Blanche I of Navarre. As King Fernando I of Navarre, he added the gold chains on red with a crown to his personal coat of arms and took the black heraldic eagle of Sancho VII as his own seal. This fit well with the eagle of Saint John his parents used as well and it showed Fernando to finally be a king in his own right.

Eleanor and Fernando would perhaps predictably divide the responsibilities of the crown between them and he got the lion’s share out of the two of them. It came as no surprise that the military and legal responsibility fell on his plate, but Eleanor reserved the right to hear clemency petitions on the behalf of her subjects. She wanted equal control of the foreign affairs of the kingdom, especially in the alliances of Navarre, and the right to fill positions in the clergy as she saw fit. To prevent troubles during their reign, all orders and proclamations were issued in both of their names, similar to the Catholic Monarchs. Fernando and Eleanor toured the kingdom during the summer, visiting the cities of Olite, Pamplona, Arguedas, Peralta and Tafalla amongst others. Feasts, hunts and other celebrations followed, as the young monarchs used the opportunities to bind the upper classes to themselves. The Count of Lérin would remain the Constable of Navarre for the rest of his life, as he was trusted by both Fernando and Eleanor. As Lérin’s youngest daughter was married to Jacques of Foix, the so-called Infante of Navarre, one of Eleanor’s great-uncles, they secured his loyalty as well. Jacques had initially been on the anti-Spanish side, but he changed his mind after the invasion and pledged himself to Fernando and Eleanor, something that brought more lords to their side.

Fernando and Eleanor remained in Navarre until 1504, when they left for Gerona in February. Their presence was needed, as conflict between Aragon and France had blossomed up in the border at Roussillon. The king had called for his son to come, as he was the heir to Aragon and needed to learn how to defend it as well. The spring was spent in military campaigns, and Fernando personally suppressed more than one revolt. Eleanor found herself pregnant in March, just after their arrival and her pregnancy was announced in April to the court. This coincided neatly with the victories in Roussillon and lifted the mood of the kingdom. Queen Isabel was also delighted by this news, as she had remained in Castile. Her health was failing at this time. The death of Prince Juan had been a brutal blow to her, but she had rallied due to Fernando and his marriage to Eleanor had vitalised her. But in 1504, the worry over her husband and the news of her daughter Juana’s unstable marriage to Philip of Burgundy occupied her mind more. In Flanders things were going both very well and at the same time not well at all. Duke Philip was getting increasingly friendly with France, even pledging his son’s hand to Helene of Valois. The dowager duchess Margaret of York had died at the end of November of 1503, much to the grief of the Low Countries and the ducal court. Philip and Juana were both devastated, as Margaret had been very much of a mother to the duke during his childhood. The two eldest ducal children had resided in her court in Malines, while the youngest one lived in the nursery in Ghent. The marriage between Philip and Juana had yielded three children in 1503, Charles, Eleanor and Isabelle. Charles had two betrothals right now, Mary of England and Helene of France, while Emperor Maximilian was negotiating with Poland, Denmark and Hungary for the sake of his granddaughters. King Alexander of Poland had two sons with his wife Helena of Moscow and the eldest one was of a proper age to wed Eleanor.

The loss of several royal councillors and friends also took its toll. Gutierre de Cárdenas and Juan Chácon both passed away during the spring. Cárdenas had been the one to escort Ferdinand into Castile to wed Isabel, then Princess of Asturias in 1469 and ever since then he had been enjoying a position of wealth and high trust. Chácon had ensured that Isabel was proclaimed queen in Avila in 1474 and had been a military force in the campaigns against Granada. More losses came in the summer. Eleanor gave premature birth to a son in Valencia, and the tiny baby, whose name has been lost to the history, died days later. In august news came from Portugal as well. King John II had passed away; leaving the throne to his only legitimate son, the Crown Prince Alfonso, now King Alfonso VI of Portugal. He was crowned with his Castilian wife Isabella of Aragon next to him in the Cathedral of Saint Mary Major in Lisbon, in an impressive and dazzling ceremony with the nobility in attendance. Their children, Eleanor, Crown Prince Joao and Peter all partook in the celebrations and feastings that lasted several days. The 13-year-old princess was the only one with a confirmed betrothal at this time, while her ten- and seven-year-old brothers had no matches yet. Joao’s hand in particular had been of great contention by his parents. Alfonso had considered a domestic match, similarly to his own parents, while Isabella wished for a foreign bride. The royal marriage market at this time was rather thin however as there were a lack of princesses. A match with Mary of England had been considered, but the english were intent of making a Hapsburg marriage for her. Helene of Valois was also an option, but Isabella was not warm to a French match. Right now, little Giovanna of Naples was strongly considered for Joao, or Eleanor of Austria. A Spanish match was not possible for Portugal, as they had none to offer right now. Little Peter escaped his parents match-making at the moment. King Alfonso was willing to make amends for some things that had taken place in his father’s reign, and thus, he called his uncle to court. Infante Manuel, Duke of Beja and Viseu had been fortunate in escaping John II’s vengeance on the rebellious nobles, while his brothers had not been as fortunate. During the late king’s reign, he had kept his head down and relied on his sister, Queen Eleanor’s protection. As head of the Order of Christ he was a powerful figure in Portugal and Alfonso wished to win his uncle over, while not relaxing the royal dominance over the nobility. As Manuel had not married yet, Alfonso decided to remedy that, by offering a bride for Manuel that was high enough for his standing, but that also would keep him allied to the royal family and keep him from wedding someone from a family opposing the crown. The bride in question was Dona Brites Anes de Santarém, the natural daughter of king John and Alfonso’s half-sister. Brites had grown up in court, and while Queen Eleanor mostly ignored her, Isabella of Aragon viewed her almost like a daughter and had supervised her education. The young woman was also a stunning beauty, something that aided her in winning over Manuel. The Braganzas were still residing in Castile, as they had been exiled since long.

Isabel had been greatly saddened by the death of her grandson, but Isabella becoming queen was a great consolation. Ferdinand’s return to her in Madrid was a great boon, and Fernando and Eleanor also came back less than a month later. The autumn of 1504 was the last one that the queen would experience. Isabel spent her last 15 months in the Old Castile of her kingdom, the long journeys from Zaragoza to Seville and from Granada to Leon was over for her part. Medina del Campo, Madrigal de las Altas Torres, Valladolid, Arévalo and Segovia were the cities that her household resided from the autumn of 1503 to her death. No doubt her life came to a fitting circle, reflecting the importance of those cities, all significant to the past of Castile and herself. James the Apostle, the saint of all Spain had preached in Arévalo, the legendary Heracles founded the cities of Avila and Segovia in the ancient times according to myth, Medina del Campo had been given to her by her late brother Alfonso, it’s fairs had been visited by her and Ferdinand many times and from here she had declared the goals of the Reconquista to be fulfilled in 1482. Her chamber in the royal palace was hung with tapestries displaying scenes from the apocalypse of Saint John, love in the form at Cupid and greenery, of death and of Heracles, the mythological forbearer of royal power. The Christmas was a muted one for the court as Isabel’s health worsened. Just before Christmas she signed her will. In her testament she declared her “kingdoms and territories to be inherited by my son, the King of Navarre and the Prince of Asturias”. On the 16th of January Isabel could not rise from her bed anymore and on the 26th, ten days later she died. The mighty queen who had taken her kingdom by force of arms, who had instituted the Inquisition, who had driven the moors and the Jews away from Spain and who had sent a Genoese sailor across the Atlantic had breathed her last before the first month of 1505 had ended.

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Death of Isabel I of Castile


Author's Note: So here we go! Fernando is now officially king of both Navarre and Castile! @Jan Olbracht, thank you for your help with the jagellions!
 
RIP isabel of Castile. The family will live on.

Long Live Fernandi VI of Castile and Leon and I Navarre. Plus Alfonso VI of Portugal. Happy that Manuel will be a loyal man. Hope we get to see Alfonso VI working together with his half-brother Gorge!

You're amazing @BlueFlowwer
 
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RIP isabel of Castile. The family will live on.
Indeed they will!
Long Live Juan III of Castile, Leon and Navarre.
Wait, what Juan are you talking about?
Plus Alfonso VI of Portugal. Happy that Manuel will be a loyal servant. Hope we get to see Alfonso VI working together with his half-brother Gorge!
King Alfonso will certainly keep his eyes on Manuel, that is for sure. As for George, well, he got a firm support in his half-brother.
Thank you!
 
Indeed they will!
Yessir! Love live the trastamaras!
Wait, what Juan are you talking about?
Sorry! My mind slipped up to your other story! Long Live fernando VI of Castile and Leon and I of Navarre.
King Alfonso will certainly keep his eyes on Manuel, that is for sure. As for George, well, he got a firm support in his half-brother.
Smart of him. And yep, George will be fiercely loyal and dedicated to his half-brother.
Thank you!
Just stating facts.
 
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