The Rise and Fall of the CSA, 1861-1881

The Confederacy, Introduction
The Rise and Fall of the CSA, 1861-1881

otherwise known as

A Study in How to Fail at Nationhood

The Confederate States of America
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The Confederate States of America (CSA), otherwise known as the Confederate States (C.S.) or the Confederacy, was short-lived republic, who achieved their independence from the United States in 1861 during the American Civil War, had a government and society dominated by a slavocracy, and was eventually brought back into the United States following their loss in the Confederate-American War. Although the nation itself was abolished in 1881, the cultural identity of many who live in the former nation carries on to this day. Although it managed to achieve foreign recognition in its time, in modern times the nation is often viewed as a standard of evil and racism, leading to its ostracization in much of modern media.

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Hello and welcome to my first ever timeline in the Maps and Graphics forum. The idea for this TL stems way back to an DBWI discussion that I was in in the pre-1900s. The real work on this TL, however, would not begin until I decided to write about the idea for an entry in a writing contest I entered. From there, I started developing and cultivating ideas for this TL, which I now hope to present to the reader. I'll be the first to admit that I don't have everything mastered in the art of wiki box making, and I certainly don't have all understood with mapmaking, but I still hope the reader can enjoy what I present them with here. I'll also admit that this isn't my primary TL right now, and as such it might receive less attention and fewer updates than my other ones, but I have a few wikiboxes created already, and ideas for a few more. Without further adieu, enjoy the timeline.
 

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Sounds interesting. A CSA which initially gains independence but crashes and burns after a few decades is a concept which is fascinating.
 
Two Unfortunate Generals: The Fates of Thomas and Grant
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George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816-October 8, 1862) was a United States Army officer and a Union general during the Civil War. A career army officer, Thomas graduated from West Point in 1840, and served with the U.S. Army throughout the antebellum period, including seeing combat in the Mexican-American War, as well as serving at varying military posts. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, Thomas would side with the United States despite of the secession of his home state of Virginia. Seeing combat and serving well in several small battles, most prominently Mill Springs, Thomas would be promoted to major general. The only battle in which he served with this rank, Perryville, would also be his last, as he was mortally wounded while directing troops into combat. His death has often been cited as a cause of the collapse of the Union line in that battle, which led to their defeat.

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Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822-April 7, 1862) was a United States officer and prominent Union general during the American Civil War. Born in Ohio, Grant showed a lack of interest in military affairs as a young man, but still received an appointment to attend West Point, which he graduated from in 1843. After serving in some military posts, Grant's antebellum military career would come to climax with his distinguished service in Mexican-American War. After that war, however, Grant grew increasingly disinterested in military life, and took to the bottle, for which he was dismissed. Again entering the military service with the coming of the Civil War, Grant would stick out from his fellow generals due to his natural aggression, which led to his promotion to major general and command of the Army of the Tennessee. Leading this force, Grant would help secure the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers with his victories at Forts Henry and Donelson respectively. Pushing south further into Tennessee, Grant would be surprised by an ambush by Confederate forces in the Battle of Shiloh. Despite the battle ultimately being a Union victory, Grant would be fatally wounded while leading a counterattack on the second day of fighting.
 
Less of a surprise than one might think. I think once the war ends, the seceded states will realize they ended up with more than what they bargained for.
I always found Confederate collapses to be unlikely. When they have an antagonistic possibly even hostile neighbor to their north, I think that may be some motivation to hang together lest they all hang separately as ole' Benny Franklin once said. I think people highlight the southern secessionist fever a bit too strongly. Southern states were quite hypocritical in terms of "states' rights". They were just fine with the federal government as long as it towed the pro-slavery line. Now that they have a country founded entirely on slavery, I think they'll be more than happy to stick together.
 
I always found Confederate collapses to be unlikely. When they have an antagonistic possibly even hostile neighbor to their north, I think that may be some motivation to hang together lest they all hang separately as ole' Benny Franklin once said. I think people highlight the southern secessionist fever a bit too strongly. Southern states were quite hypocritical in terms of "states' rights". They were just fine with the federal government as long as it towed the pro-slavery line. Now that they have a country founded entirely on slavery, I think they'll be more than happy to stick together.
They'll probably be happy to stick together until the 1880s or 1890s. Brazil abolished slavery in 1888, so that would leave the CSA as the last country standing with slavery assuming they don't abolish it before then. I know the CSA Constitution prohibited the states and the national government from abolishing slavery but the Constitution is going to have to adapt if it wants to survive. I would imagine that the more industrialized states of North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee are lowkey embarrassed about being associated with the last country in the western hemisphere to have slavery legal, especially if the rest of the Confederacy isn't in any mood to abolish it or if it even expands (some of Davis' officers and inner circle allegedly wanted to enslave its poor white population). Under that condition, I can see those three states wanting to secede from the CSA and possibly return to the Union. And when Texas discovers oil in the 1890s-1900s, it's going to want to keep as much of it as it can for itself, even if it means seceding from the CSA.
 
What happens with Arizona, Indian Territory, Kentucky, and Missouri? @TheRockofChickamauga
From the Wiki it looks like they aren't in the Confederacy officially. Would be interesting if KY or Missouri were, they rarely get included in independent South timelines, which makes it much harder for me to pilfer---I mean get inspired by!---ideas with what to do with KY in my own independent South timeline I'm writing.
 
From the Wiki it looks like they aren't in the Confederacy officially. Would be interesting if KY or Missouri were, they rarely get included in independent South timelines, which makes it much harder for me to pilfer---I mean get inspired by!---ideas with what to do with KY in my own independent South timeline I'm writing.
Kentucky and Missouri were actually admitted into the Confederacy, hence thirteen stars on the Confederate flag. I would expect that if the CSA wins the Civil War, they are going to demand Kentucky and Missouri.

 
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They'll probably be happy to stick together until the 1880s or 1890s. Brazil abolished slavery in 1888, so that would leave the CSA as the last country standing with slavery assuming they don't abolish it before then. I know the CSA Constitution prohibited the states and the national government from abolishing slavery but the Constitution is going to have to adapt if it wants to survive. I would imagine that the more industrialized states of North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee are lowkey embarrassed about being associated with the last country in the western hemisphere to have slavery legal, especially if the rest of the Confederacy isn't in any mood to abolish it or if it even expands (some of Davis' officers and inner circle allegedly wanted to enslave its poor white population). Under that condition, I can see those three states wanting to secede from the CSA and possibly return to the Union. And when Texas discovers oil in the 1890s-1900s, it's going to want to keep as much of it as it can for itself, even if it means seceding from the CSA.
I doubt that states that recently fought a bloody war to separate from the US would so willingly return to the nation they fought against. Texas, on the other hand, I can see. Especially if they feel like their interests aren't being protected by the CSA. Though they'd likely just go independent.
 
Hurting the ones you love?

I'm not as big on the nuances of the American Civil War as other posters, but I'll be watching. Curious to see how the Confederacy both wins its independence and melts back into the US.
Well, if the goal is temporarily grant the CSA its independence, eliminating Thomas is a good first step.
 
Wow, I am blown away by all the likes this TL is receiving. Even though the first entry hasn't even been up for a full day yet, it almost has any many like as the first chapter of main ATL. Thank you everyone for all the likes!
 
What happens with Arizona, Indian Territory, Kentucky, and Missouri? @TheRockofChickamauga
Without spoiling too much, both sides north and south are eager to negotiate peace as quickly as possible both for their own different reasons, and during the negotiations, the CSA agree to independence only for the states that officially seceded from the Union, as such none of the states/territories you mentioned join the CSA, despite the CSA being slightly annoyed by Arizona being withheld.
 
List of U.S. Presidents 1789-1957/List of CSA Presidents 1861-1881

The President of the United States (position established: 1789) serves as the head of the Executive Branch of the United States national government. Created by Article II of the U.S. Constitution, the President serves a four-year term after winning the presidential election and may run for reelection an unlimited numbers of times, although the precedent set by Washington dictates two terms in office. Among the powers and roles of the office including serving as Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. military, appointing judges to the Judicial Branch, the power to veto bills passed by Congress, and the ability to hand down pardons. The president appoints a group of adviser known as his cabinet to head each department. A president can be removed from office via impeachment by the House and conviction by the Senate. Although two presidents have been impeached by the House (Augustus C. Dodge and Huey P. Long), neither were removed from office by the Senate.


The President of the Confederate States of America (position established: 1862, position abolished: 1881) served as the head of the Executive Branch of the Confederate States national government. Created by Article II of the CSA Constitution, the Confederate president served for a six year term of office, and was ineligible for reelection once that term had been served. From this position, the President was granted such powers as to be Commander-in-Chief of the CSA Army, the ability to appoint diplomats to diplomatic posts abroad, and the right to choose the men who would constitute his cabinet of advisers. The president could be impeached by the House and convicted by the Senate to be removed from office, but this power was never exercised. The position of president of the CSA was last filled by Nathan B. Forrest, whose death during the Siege of Richmond would mark the end of the presidency, despite Vice-President Morgan still being alive. This was due to the rapidly disintegrating state of CSA, and the lack of anyone to inaugurate Morgan.
 
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