The RDNA-verse: A Strange, Worldbuilding TL

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by mdc_1957, Nov 25, 2019.

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  1. Threadmarks: South America (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    South America: A Basic Introduction

    Covering an area of 17,840,000 square km., or approximately 12% of the Earth's landmass, South America is the fourth largest continent on the globe. Forming the lower half of the New World, and straddling the Southern Hemisphere, it is also home to two of the leading "Free Nations" and remains largely free from Collectivist control in spite of the Terror. While some may dispute how "free" they are, few would deny how they stay defiant and firm.

    In contrast to North America, the history of much of the South after the 16th Century is tied with Spain and Portugal. With the loss of what would become New Austria to the Habsburgs of the Holy Roman Empire, the Spanish Crown focused more on its reduced resources into settling and developing their remaining lands. Following the defeat of the last Incan holdouts in 1590, these burgeoning territories consolidated into the Viceroyalties of Nueva Granada, Peru and (by 1685) Rio de la Plata. While Madrid's hold over these vast lands seemed ironclad for a time, this gradually unraveled. Beginning with the Patagonian Rebellion in 1797, however, these colonies waged their own wars of independence, which by the 1820s coalesced around Gran Patagonia (following the 1806 Unity Accord endorsed by Francisco de San Martín) and the republics of the Latin Alliance led by Colombia (forged as a compromise by Simon Bolivar and Camilo Tenorio).

    Since the Terror, however, Gran Patagonia has emerged as not only the self-proclaimed successor to fallen Spain's heritage and a dominant power in its own right, but alongside the American Federation has become (as its people claim) a powerful bastion of republicanism and democracy. While it managed to consolidate the fractured remnants of Peru and Spain's island territories, however, the Latin Alliance crumbled. All that remains of it is the Reactionary-controlled Republic of Colombia further north. Though nominally a member of the "League of Neutral Defiance", the ruling "Bolivaristas" remain adamant in restoring their country's power by any means, even in the face of growing tensions and militias backed by the Collectivist Internationale.

    Meanwhile, much of the continent's remainder is dominated by the Legitimate Union of Brazil, more commonly known as Portuguese Brazil. Compared to the surrounding Spanish territories, a blend of substantial colonial ventures and hard-earned compromises had led to the realm's rise as a "Co-Kingdom" to Portugal by 1825, with plans to form an equal union if not for the Terror. While nominally host to the House of Braganza much like New Austria's Habsburg Throne-in-Exile, the Lusitanian Brigantine Throne has remained "vacant" since the Belem Incident of 1992, with elements of the Brazilian military (said to be backed alongside republican parties by Gran Patagonia) maintaining a regency in what has been coined a "Military Interregnum."

    Whatever their issues, these nations and the remainder of the "Free World" have undeniably done much to hold back the Internationale and its so-called "Will of the Workers." Represented by the likes of the People's Equatorial Union, the Collectivists are known to have remade their corner of South America in their distorted image over generations. Testimonies from refugees and so-called "unpersons" speaking of centuries of history being destroyed forever, while the frontiers even in the Amazon are among the most heavily armed on the globe.

    Even with such ever-present issues, there remains much for anyone willing to take the risk. Though to truly understand South America, one may find it wise to visit Portuguese Brazil, or perhaps Gran Patagonia, while he or she still could.

    - “The Knowledgeable Traveller’s Guide to the New World.” Royal Dominion of New Austria. 2023 Edition. English Edition.

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    As a bit of trivia, while the flag for Gran Patagonia is the same as from back in 2010, the one for the Legitimate Union of Brazil was considerably tweaked to look much more professional and befitting its culture. Meanwhile, the Colombian flag uses a coat of arms that combines elements from various aspects of its real-world history, particularly the insignia for Gran Colombia.

    Some of the placenames, such as "Colonia Dresde" and "Novo Milão" are not only hints as to where certain "Lost Nation" refugees fled to after the Terror, but also mirrors how German and Italian settlers also established themselves in South America.

    Gran Patagonia's position and standing as the other leading republican power is meant to be a mirror of the Americans in-universe in more ways than one, albeit more aggressive and less idealistic.

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  2. Threadmarks: The Legitimate Union of Brazil (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    The Legitimate Union of Brazil: A General Overview

    The Legitimate Union of Brazil, more commonly known as either Portuguese Brazil, Legitimist Brazil or simply Brazil, has traditionally been one of the leading nations of South America. Nominally a constitutional monarchy under the Braganza dynasty, the so-called Lusitanian Brigantine Throne has formally remained empty since 1992. In reality, it remains a dictatorship under a"Military Interregnum," presided over by Regent-President João Figueiredo Barbosa since 2001. While its standing in the Free World may remain firm on paper only, despite being one of the founding members of the Assembly of the Free World, this realm's clout and prestige remain undeniable.

    A self-proclaimed successor to the lost Kingdom of Portugal since the 1928 Reconsolidation, the country has over the centuries embraced its peculiar heritage. Many of Brazil's 19 Provinces, indeed, could be traced back to Portuguese colonization and the early frontier settlements, with the capital of São Paulo being on par with New Vienna (Neu Wien) as one of the oldest major cities in the New World. The Congresso Nacional ("National Congress") is the realm's legislative body, comprised of a National Senate (which still retains an aristocratic element) and Chamber of Deputies, which has endured in spite of the suspension of elections until the easing of "emergency powers" in 2017. While the Regent-President (initially Regent-General) and the Junta da Renovação Nacional ("Council for National Renewal" or simply the Junta), comprised of elements from the Forças Armadas Brasileiras ("Brazilian Armed Forces") and what's left of the monarchist parties, still remain a firm grip, political power has traditionally been split among the nobility, Prime Minister and Braganza monarch. Also of note is how, in addition to various military and autonomous territories - which include the former Portuguese colony of Angola, the Açores and Madeira - the Brazilians still proudly host the Vatican-in-Exile, alongside their old New Austrian allies.

    Despite not being as prosperous as it once was, the economy of Portuguese Brazil has proven itself to be resilient. Whether it be the bustling factories of Rio Grande do Sol, the thriving financial banks of São Paulo, the sugarcane plantations of Goiás, the myriad historic towns or Grão-Pará's mercantile ports, the country has more than its fair share of homegrown industries that even the ruling Junta have tried to support. Thus, while its reliance on neighboring Gran Patagonia has grown over decades, its over 200 million-strong people have refused to allow themselves to be dependent or impoverished.

    Mirroring both New Austria and certain corners of the old Latin Alliance, Brazilians are a rather blended, diverse populace. Many could justifiably claim Portuguese lineage through settlers, immigrants and refugees, in addition to the descendants of African slaves, Angolans and other European arrivals (including Italians some Dutch). At the same time, however, the definitions for what constitutes Blancos ("Whites") and Pardos ("Mixed"), as well as Pretos ("Blacks") and Indígenas ("Natives"), have broadened and blurred over centuries, resulting in overlapping more often than not. Most if not all, nonetheless, are united by shared lingua franca (such as Brazilian Portuguese and local creoles), a common history and sense of patriotism, whether to the formally empty Throne or to their homeland. That many remain firmly Roman Catholic (thanks in part to the Vatican-in-Exile) while embrace their culture and independence has certainly helped.

    This is not to downplay how deep Portuguese Brazil's predicament is. The local political landscape has since been split in a tenuous status quo between the ruling Junta and Coalizão pela Liberdade ("Coalition for Liberty"), an alliance of opposition parties increasingly dominated by republicans, until the question of the surviving Braganzas is resolved. Both camps, however, are said to be backed by Gran Patagonia, if New Austrian and certain monarchist claims are to be believed. Although officials in Buenos Aires repeatedly deny such accusations aside from offers of aid in 1992, despite reports to the contrary, few could deny how their supposed influence in Brazilian affairs have helped provide the current regime a sense of legitimacy and hold back potential Collectivist designs. Which haven't squashed growing concerns over whether this realm even deserves its place in the sun.

    A Brief History of Portuguese Brazil

    While the ancestors of today's Indígenas, particularly the Taino, have lived in the vicinity of what would become the Legitimate Union of Brazil, the country's origins are tied with Portugal's exploration of the New World. In 1534, the myriad budding colonies and outposts along the coast were consolidated under a more centralized authority. Over the next several decades, colonists and slaves alike began arriving in growing numbers, while missionaries and groups of bandeirantes explored more of the unknown interior. Though such ventures at first didn't quite match with the Austrian Habsburgs further north or the Spanish efforts elsewhere, time would be on their side.

    As the Portuguese invested ever more on their South American territories over the next 200 years, a complex relationship with the homeland emerged. More of the colonists, who grew increasingly prosperous from produce like sugarcane and eventually gold, had begun seeing themselves as "Brazilian." Meanwhile, mutual co-existence and intermingling with the Indígenas (initially tolerated to ensure order) grew increasingly acceptable, though similar trends involving Pretos gradually led to concerns over matters like slavery as an institution. Although such issues would be the cause of several disputes and more than a handful of revolts (including the so-called Quilombo War of 1768), a series of hard-won compromises helped set colonial society on a path to not only the formal abolition of slavery in 1799 or greater ethnic integration. But in the process, it also fostered ties with New Austria and more importantly, raised the colony's standing in the eyes of Portugal itself.

    Brazil's ascension as a Co-Kingdom in 1825 would spur a period of expansion and development. More immigrants and settlers, including those from outside Portugal, flocked in with new industries and technologies, while further contributing to the nascent Brazilian national consciousness. Within a generation, the realm came to be more than firm enough to challenge the states that emerged from the wars of independence against Spain, rivaling the republican upstarts of what is now Gran Patagonia. It wasn't long, however, before this rise fostered a growing sense of Lusophone solidarity and loyalty. By the dawn of the 20th Century, Brazil and Portugal increasingly saw each other as equals more than anything else. From what's known, there were even plans to formalize a genuine union between the two, which had started with the Common Settlement of 1887, that would have solidified the ruling Braganzas' peaceful hegemony with popular acclaim.

    The Terror brought such dreams to a halt. Despite the valiant efforts by the Portuguese, by 1925 what remained of the Kingdom's territories were handed over to Brazil, as the old homeland crumbled before the Collectivists. Amidst the chaos, the heir-apparent Prince Afonso assumed control in São Paulo in 1926, his quick actions decisive in helping preserve the realm in the face of seeming destruction. When it became evident, however, that Portugal itself was beyond saving, he reluctantly oversaw the formal Reconsolidation in 1928 and was crowned King Afonso VII. His reign saw his country through the next few decades as one of the most dominant of the Free Nations. Though gradually, conditions were unraveling.

    While his efforts to ensure both Portuguese Brazil's survival and that of the Lusitanian Brigandine Throne were initially successful, these would have unintended consequences. Even with New Austrian support, the Brazilians found themselves harder pressed by the 1950s to sustain efforts to directly contain the Collectivist Internationale's machinations along its extensive borders. This wasn't helped by the growing economic and political clout of its long-time rival Gran Patagonia, especially as it became more successful in promoting republicanism as an alternative. Meanwhile, the special mandates given to the Forças Armadas Brasileiras (originally meant to help quell Collectivist influence) over time allowed it to establish "Military Districts" and gain greater say in political affairs. While the monarchy and civil government tried to maintain a balance, which for a time work, it fell apart during the Belem Incident of 1992.

    In a heinous bombing instigated by Collectivist sleeper agents, King Pedro V, along with immediate members of the royal family and hundreds of bystanders, was killed while on a landmark tour across the realm. While the fractured nobility and what remained of the Braganza line bickered over the line of succession, however, military elements led by General Fernando Silva e Oliveira (himself a descendant of a family of military commanders) invoked "emergency powers" and, as the first Regent-President, formed what would become the Junta. It wouldn't be until 2017 that some of the excesses, including the suspension of elections and curtailment of many political freedoms, were lifted.

    Time will tell, however, if this storied country could truly regain its place in the Free World.

    - “Atlas Sans Frontieres: The Gaspereau-Thomson Guide to the New World.” Loyalist Canada. 2023.

    ----​

    As a bit of trivia, some of the placenames are archaic or earlier forms of actual Brazilian cities and states. Whether it's Grão-Pará still being somewhat intact, or Parahyba being what would have been the city of João Pessoa.

    Aspects of Brazil's history is a melange of various elements across its actual past, from Portuguese colonization to the War of the Triple Alliance and even the military dictatorship during the Cold War. The latter point, though, is in part due to considerable Gran Patagonian meddling. There are also some influences from Portuguese history and even some aspects of Inter-war Hungary (with the "Regent-General" and "Regent-President" not too unlike "Regent-for-life").

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  3. Pen A lot more down to earth now, I suppose.

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    What's with the image artifacts?


    Edit: I think that's just my monitor, sorry haha
     
  4. Threadmarks: The Braganzas and Military Interregnum (c.2019)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    On the Lusitanian Brigandine Throne

    ...Brazil's ascension as a Co-Kingdom in 1825 would spur a period of expansion and development. More immigrants and settlers, including those from outside Portugal, flocked in with new industries and technologies, while further contributing to the nascent Brazilian national consciousness. Within a generation, the realm came to be more than firm enough to challenge the states that emerged from the wars of independence against Spain, rivaling the republican upstarts of what is now Gran Patagonia. It wasn't long, however, before this rise fostered a growing sense of Lusophone solidarity and loyalty. By the dawn of the 20th Century, Brazil and Portugal increasingly saw each other as equals more than anything else. From what's known, there were even plans to formalize a genuine union between the two, which had started with the Common Settlement of 1887, that would have solidified the ruling Braganzas' peaceful hegemony with popular acclaim.

    The Terror brought such dreams to a halt. Despite the valiant efforts by the Portuguese, by 1925 what remained of the Kingdom's territories were handed over to Brazil, as the old homeland crumbled before the Collectivists. Amidst the chaos, the heir-apparent Prince Afonso assumed control in São Paulo in 1926, his quick actions decisive in helping preserve the realm in the face of seeming destruction. When it became evident, however, that Portugal itself was beyond saving, he reluctantly oversaw the formal Reconsolidation in 1928 and was crowned King Afonso VII. His reign saw his country through the next few decades as one of the most dominant of the Free Nations. Though gradually, conditions were unraveling.

    While his efforts to ensure both Portuguese Brazil's survival and that of the Lusitanian Brigandine Throne were initially successful, these would have unintended consequences. Even with New Austrian support, the Brazilians found themselves harder pressed by the 1950s to sustain efforts to directly contain the Collectivist Internationale's machinations along its extensive borders. This wasn't helped by the growing economic and political clout of its long-time rival Gran Patagonia, especially as it became more successful in promoting republicanism as an alternative. Meanwhile, the special mandates given to the Forças Armadas Brasileiras (originally meant to help quell Collectivist influence) over time allowed it to establish "Military Districts" and gain greater say in political affairs. While the monarchy and civil government tried to maintain a balance, which for a time work, it fell apart during the Belem Incident of 1992.

    In a heinous bombing instigated by Collectivist sleeper agents, King Pedro V, along with immediate members of the royal family and hundreds of bystanders, was killed while on a landmark tour across the realm. While the fractured nobility and what remained of the Braganza line bickered over the line of succession, however, military elements led by General Fernando Silva e Oliveira (himself a descendant of a family of military commanders) invoked "emergency powers" and, as the first Regent-President, formed what would become the Junta. It wouldn't be until 2017 that some of the excesses, including the suspension of elections and curtailment of many political freedoms, were lifted.

    Time will tell, however, if this storied country could truly regain its place in the Free World.

    - Snippet from “Atlas Sans Frontieres: The Gaspereau-Thomson Guide to the New World.” Loyalist Canada. 2023.

    ----​

    For added reference, the images for the Braganzas shown are derived from actual members of both the Portuguese and Brazilian branches of the line. While the the pictures used for the "Regent-Presidents" are nods to Brazil's military coups in the mid-20th Century and Cold War.

    Although the text is technically lifted from the Brazilian entry, the emphasis (further highlighted in the details) is also on the complicity of Gran Patagonia (and to an extent, the American Federation) in maintaining the ruling regime. With implications that Buenos Aires may be backing both sides of the power struggle in Brazil.

    The image used for Brazil's Regent-President Barbosa, though hearkening to the Cold War-era military dictatorship, is based on Ernesto Geisel, one of the figures who set the stage for Brazil's eventual transition back to democracy. Which in-universe, mirrors Barbosa lifting some of the excesses of the ruling Junta.



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  5. nemo1986 Member of Red Sox Nation

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    Boston
    So who are the current claimants to the throne? Also I am surprised there was never an invasion of Panama and Peru. At least to regain the canal if it exists here.
     
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  6. mdc_1957 Still present here

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    Part of the problem for Brazil is that, while there are a number of potential heirs from rather distant relatives (along with rumors that one of the children survived the "Belem Incident"), the emergency powers granted to the military (intended to maintain order in the event of a worst-case scenario) took precedence. That's in addition to the ruling junta being more interested in delaying the proper restoration of the monarchy. Not to mention, Gran Patagonia's implicit support for both the regime and republican opposition, further dimming any prospects of a restoration at all, unless something dramatic happens.

    As for Panama and Peru, it's not like there weren't attempts initially, though a combination of guerilla tactics and later threats of atomic retaliation made any serious attempt to drive the Internationale from the New World near impossible by the mid-20th Century. That the Reactionary "Bolivaristas" of Colombia have their own agenda compared to the other Free Nations certainly doesn't help matters.
     
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  7. Threadmarks: The Sovereign Federated Republic of Gran Patagonia (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    A Brief History of Gran Patagonia.

    The territories that comprise the Sovereign Federated Republic of Gran Patagonia can trace their origins to the 16th Century. Despite economic troubles and the formal relinquishing of what became New Austria in 1554, the Kingdom of Spain still retained control over its remaining budding colonies. This was particularly true in South America, where missionaries, conquistadors and settlers continued streaming into the New World, as well as colonists displaced by the Habsburgs, enticed by the Spanish Crown's efforts. By 1590, when the last remnants of the so-called Incan Empire were crushed, these increasingly pacified lands were organized into the Viceroyalties of Nueva Granada and Peru. Among the myriad Governorates that were brought under the latter's jurisdiction was that of Rio de la Plata, based from the burgeoning port of Buenos Aires (founded as a permanent city in 1576). Over the course of decades, the region's clout as a trading hub and crucial link to the homeland grew, contributing to its ascension as a Viceroyalty in its own right in 1685.

    While Spanish rule remained firm, the increasingly overbearing grip of distant Madrid did little to ease tensions. Though present across the colonies and varied depending on the Viceroyalty, these were particularly evident in Rio de la Plata, by then known more as either "Argentina" or "Patagonia" by the locals, as calls for greater self-rule and reform were met with either indifference or ever more severe reprisals. By the 18th Century, these only worsened and came to include various grievances, ranging from slavery and taxes to notions of outright independence. That these paralleled the Thirteen Colonies much further north proved to be no coincidence, especially as republican ideas spread through illicit exchanges between the two colonial groups. A botched attempt to quell a group of disgruntled sailors and farmers would prove to be the final straw, sparking the Patagonian Rebellion in 1797, which in turn spurred the wars of independence across South America. From the ensuing chaos rose figures such as Francisco de San Martín, who alongside the likes of José Gervasio Artigas and Mariano Moreno, convened a Cortes Generales (an equivalent of Congress) separate from that of the old homeland in Buenos Aires. As bickering among Argentine rebels risked tearing the momentum apart, however, something had to be done. Thus, when victory over the remaining royalists seemed imminent, that the 1806 Unity Accord was signed with San Martín's endorsement, formally establishing what was at that time known as the Federated Republic of Argentina.

    The initial years following the signing of the Unity Accord and subsequent surrender of the remaining Spanish garrisons were tumultuous for the fledgling nation, but the triumphant Libertadores (not unlike the "Founding Fathers" of the American Federation) were tenacious in seeing that the dream of "Latin Republicanism" wasn't in vain. The efforts to fend off raids by Native Indian tribes (called Indios in the vernacular), which persisted from the colonial period, encouraged a gradual expansion and consolidation of the frontiers as more settlers crossed the Atlantic. Yet even as the Argentine Provinces were becoming able to stand on their own, tensions flared with other revolutionaries (including Simon Bolivar) and the emergent Latin Alliance states, on top of an emerging rivalry with the Brazilians, who remained loyal to Portugal. The one exception were the Chileans, who stayed a firm ally amidst the power struggles among the now-independent colonies. It was the fateful decision, however, in 1830 to support deposed leader José Miguel Carrera and his supporters following a royalist coup that marked a shift in the the Federated Republic's evolution. Following a successful campaign two years later, it was seen as preferable for Chile to be integrated as a federal protectorate, allowed to otherwise run its own affairs. A similar outcome came from the War of Paraguayan Aggression in 1845-47. Fought in support of republican supporters against an autocratic regime with utopian aspirations, what was left of the populace (by then having mixed with the Guarani) welcomed integration. Then, mirroring America's "Continental Destiny," throngs of soldiers and pioneers pushed southward towards the Strait of Magellan. Though not without conflict, as notoriously with the Mapuche tribes (which were eventually granted relative autonomy in the Province of Nehuenken), it also opened new opportunities for those willing to take the risks.

    By the late 19th Century, the Federated Republic had become an emergent power in the region, attracting settlers not only from Spain but also from other parts of Europe, including Italians and even some Germans. Indeed, relations with the old homeland itself had improved significantly, due to a combination of trade, mutual respect and a series of liberalizing reforms by the Spanish Crown. At the same time, with everything south of the old Rio de la Plata all under one flag, it became more popular for locals (whether in or outside the Argentine Provinces) to refer to their lands as Gran Patagonia, which even reached official documents by 1890. This also coincided, however, with growing debate over how to address the increasingly intertwined "Free States," which were effectively subordinate to Argentina. These concerns didn't stop the flow of people and wealth, let alone its ascension as America's Latin equal. That was, until the Terror happened. Although the country tried initially to simply maintain a state of constant readiness, that changed rapidly as news spread of just how severe that "Old World problem" truly was. Volunteers and eventually, whole divisions were being deployed to Cape Verde and the Spanish Canary Islands (or Islas Canarias Españolas) to help in holding the line against the Collectivists in the Iberian Peninsula. This ultimately failed, with the Gran Patagonians forced to instead defend the last remaining refugee vessels from a dying Spain. This would leave a lasting stain on the public consciousness.

    In 1929, the current Constitution was enacted, from which the Sovereign Federated Republic of Gran Patagonia takes its official name. More than codifying reforms (such as granting the now "Federal Constituent States" formal equality and autonomy from Buenos Aires), however, this also proclaimed the nation as the legitimate successor to Spain's fallen heritage and culture. These became even more poignant with the ongoing collapse of the Latin Alliance by then through Collectivist subversion, which led to Upper Peru being made a protectorate in 1932 and later integrated. Yet while its drive to fend off the "Red Menace" has inspired a similar if rather murkier sense of paranoia among the public to the Americans, as seen with their response to the 1992 Belem Incident in Portuguese Brazil, few can deny their commitment to democracy or their position as one of the leading republican powers of the Free World.

    Gran Patagonia Today.

    The Sovereign Federated Republic of Gran Patagonia, known alternatively as Gran Patagonia or Greater Argentina, is among the leading nations of the Free World situated in the lower half of South America. Currently under the term of President Jose Manuel Salazar y Ferrer, it continues to hold true to the ideals cherished by the Libertadores. Alongside the American Federation, it forms a kind of axis of republican liberty straddling both ends of the New World. It goes without saying that its people have much to offer.

    The "Latin Republicanism" upheld by the Gran Patagonians is a fascinating blend of various influences, including from the American Founding Fathers, on top of its deep Spanish inheritance. The country is formally comprised of 20 Argentine Provinces (some of which could be traced back to the Viceroyalty of Rio de la Plata), as well as a number of Federal Constituent States and Territories, largely founded by settlers and immigrants over the centuries. Still known colloquially as "Free States" (particularly those in South America), they notably enjoy significant liberties and largely run their own affairs, complete with their own internal governments, though the Argentine Provinces remain "first among equals." The Cortes Generales Federal in Buenos Aires serves as the legislature (split between the Senate and Chamber of Deputies), which as with the American Federation, is counterbalanced by the executive and judiciary. The President, Vice-President and Senators are elected every four years by direct popular voting, though other positions tend to have more varied means. The growing presence of Revivalists in recent years, however (notably the rise of the Partido Restitución Español or "Spanish Restoration Party"), has shaken the long-time dominance of the Partido Nacional Demócrata ("National Democrats") and Unión Federal Renovador ("Coalition for Liberty") in the political scene. Nonetheless, the system has been particular resilient over its generations-long evolution. Few would doubt that their commitment to equality, liberty or other republican virtues, whatever the cost, is any less today than in the time of San Martín.

    Its economic and industrial clout are also noteworthy. Through a blend of trade, a work ethic based on individual merit, a bounty of natural resources, and a mindset that promotes dedication as well as ingenuity, Gran Patagonia has risen to new heights among the Free Nations. From the thriving ports and elegant boulevards of Buenos Aires itself to the Chilean wineries near Santiago, from the Gaucho-tended plains of La Pampa and fisheries of Islas Malvinas to the industrial complexes of Tucumán, there's no lacking in specialties. Which isn't to ignore its military contributions, being responsible for helping contain the Collectivist Internationale's foothold in the New World and alongside its allies, prevent any further subversion by whatever means necessary.

    Nor should one ignore the over 110 Million people who make up the tapestry that's Gran Patagonia. While the majority of the population is classified as European, these also go past American standards of "White" to include mixed-race Mestizos. Among them, however, the Criollo-Españoles ("Creoles-Spaniards"), whether descended from the original colonists or later arrivals from Spain, take precedence over other European lineages, of which those of Italians and Prussian origin tend to predominate. The remainder, meanwhile, are largely comprised of the Indios, particularly the Mapuches, Quechua (Incan descendants in Upper Peru) and the Guarani (a peculiar case due to being technically Mestizo outside Paraguay), who have long since overcome long-held tensions and discrimination against them. The same, however, couldn't be said of their treatment of certain foreigners, though more for cultural and historical reasons than anything else. This is particularly evident in the disdain for New Austrians outside of them being monarchist, due to lingering smears (going back to the colonial period) of them being "traitors" to Spain, as well as with Brazilians due to long-standing rivalries and more recent perceptions of inferiority. To say nothing of how defensive and at times, confrontational, Gran Patagonians can be when dealing with the seeming contradictions of their love of liberty and, as slanderous rumors highlight, a seeming willingness to maintain power at all costs, as with Brazil.
    Still, even with the harrowing reality of the Reds, the people of that corner of the New World will do whatever it takes to ensure their motto of En unidad y democracia ("In unity and democracy") stays true. No matter what.

    - "The Westinghouse Atlas of the New World." American Federation. 2023 Edition.

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    As a bit of trivia, some of the Argentinian placenames are either archaic forms or references to historical events in Latin American history. In addition, some of them are nods to the actual tendencies of towns and cities there to take cues from the immigrants who founded them.

    While Gran Patagonia's democracy is very much functional, the murkier aspects of it are an amalgamation elements from various dictatorial regimes in Latin America, particularly around the time of the actual Cold War.

    The Sol de la Republica is the Sol de Mayo or Sun of May, the national emblem of both Argentina and Uruguay in real life.

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  8. Stretch The One Who Has Seen Too Much

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    This is a really interesting world, how did the 'not Soviet Union' get to where they are today, as well as maintain their position? Are there any other nation people other than Fraulein?
     
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  9. mdc_1957 Still present here

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    The Collectivists, at least after the initial chaos of the Terror, expanded through a mix of overt military action, internal subversion, and proxies like Internationale-backed militias. Although there’s infighting and internal unrest to a degree (due in part to divergent branches of Collectivism), it’s implied that this is partially on purpose as a Darwinian push to preserve power.

    As for other nation people? I can neither confirm nor deny
     
  10. Threadmarks: Western Europe (c.2015)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    The Eternal Cold War: Western Europe

    The lands encompassing Western Europe – including the region known as Mitteleuropa – were once home to various countries and Great Powers, of a number of storied cultures, industries and nationalities. During the so-called Indian Summer in 1920, few according to the historical record believed that the relative peace that prevailed at the time was to be irreversibly shattered. Thus when the first stirrings of the Terror occurred, it came as a shock, albeit one that could be countered and remedied. But even as that hope diminished and the Collectivist chaos grew to engulf much of the Old World, it didn’t occur that the Continent – from Scandinavia down to the mountains of Greece – would succumb until it was too late. Let alone become one of the largest focal points of a Cold War that continues nearly a century on.

    Today, a few Free Nations remain or otherwise hold territories around the region. Their existence at large is as tenuous as it is defiant in the face of the Collectivist Internationale. A “Red Curtain” separating what remains of Europe from contemptible tyrants seeking to complete their vaunted Revolution, even at the risk of global war.

    Of the monarchies in particular, only the Kingdom of South Italy is able to cling to its people’s Continental homeland. Originally the Kingdom of the Two Italies following the 1854 Unification, the realm was among the last in Western Europe to be affected by the Terror. As their neighbors crumbled around them, from 1926 to 1930 the House of Savoia-Siracusa enacted what was called Case Rubicon: a series of gradually receding defense lines meant to protect whatever could still be saved of their country from the Red tide. Those who were left behind for one reason or another left nothing for the advancing Collectivists to take, including the brutal Fall of Rome in 1928. Their honourable sacrifice bought time however for the remnants of the original Papacy to escape as well as for Italian forces and remnant militias to fortify against what would soon become the Internationale. But it wasn’t until further years of entrenched conflict, culminating bloodied retreat from Napoli in 1937 that South Italy’s borders and domains – including the Italo-Arabic Tunisian provinces – were firmly secured. In the process fostering both a close sense of solidarity and a fortress mentality among the populace, which could be seen today in its militaristic policies, mass conscription and one of the most heavily armed frontiers in the West.

    Under nominal South Italian protection meanwhile is Malta, often called the last of the Crusader Kingdoms. This informal title stems from the reigning Sovereign Knights of Malta – itself a direct continuation of the famed Knights Hospitaller from medieval lore – which have ruled since 1530, now under Grand Master Zimmerman. Over the centuries, especially since becoming a protectorate in 1870, the Maltese have made the most of their seafaring position in the Mediterranean as well as fostered a deep sense of continuity. Since the Terror however, this small land has developed a notoriety that reaches across the Atlantic. For while the Knights are in communion with the Vatican-in-Exile, the peculiar, zealous form of Roman Catholicism being encouraged has helped cultivate a vocal and increasingly unpredictable zeitgeist. Still, despite the as yet hollow rallying cries of waging a final Crusade against the Collectivists – as worrisome it may be for the Italian delegates as well as cardinals in faraway Mariazell-am-Meer in New Austria – Malta has proven time and again to be a vital partner for the realm’s liege.

    In the Atlantic, off the shores of the Old World, the scattered remnants of fallen realms have long become host to their own colonial successors. The Canary Islands, originally part of the Kingdom of Spain since 1402, became a vital stopping point during the Terror, primarily of refugees hailing from that now-Lost Nation; from here, Spaniards fled to relative sanctuary of the New World, notably Kuba and the former colony of Gran Patagonia. From here and unable to arrive in time to save the mainland, the expeditionary forces sent from Buenos Aires took command of what remained of that realm’s navy before bringing the islands under republican rule in 1929, when it became apparent that the centuries-old European power was no more. A similar fate befell Madeira and the Azores, which had been Portuguese since the 15th Century before falling under the monarchist Brazilians in 1925. While the fates of the Free Nations that hold sovereignty over these islands have diverged even more over the past generations – with Gran Patagonians eclipsing Brazil in their sphere – these small fragments still hold as much cultural value as strategic ones. For in their myriad peoples, landscapes and landmarks, one could still glimpse shades of what their ancestral homelands once were.

    While across the English Channel, the British Isles remain battered but free. The United Kingdom, under the reigning Windsor-Romanovs through Her Majesty, Queen Victoria III still stands firm as the historic heart of the British Imperial Commonwealth. Compared to the Continent, the initial impact of the Terror manifested in unrest and emergency rule across parts of the British Empire, with some such as Southern Africa, Australia and most of Ireland having declared independence by 1928 under an ideology called Reactionarism while others succumbed to the Reds. London persevered nonetheless and alongside the Canadians succeeded in consolidating what remained into a major power, codified in 1938 with the Commonwealth Reforms. Much damage was wrought however in the attempted Invasion of 1942-44, be it from invading Reds, their sleeper cells or the Pyrrhic scorched earth “victories” of that madwoman New Austria. Though the worst has long passed, Britain today continues to be a protectorate of Loyalist Canada, a sizable portion of the populace descended from refugees as far afield as former France, Russia and even India. There remain portions of the countryside where the scars of war are visible, haunting reminders of a dark time when the Kingdom’s fortunes seemed to slide forever. Yet in spite of lost glories, disputes with the isolationist Irish Reactionaries and disheartened talk of being “one glorified airstrip” for their Canadian brothers-in-arms, the U.K. strides onward with valour. From England’s factories to the Scottish Highlands, from the rebuilt capitol of London to the garrisons in Dover, Britannia’s influence endures.

    It’s not surprising then that the U.K. holds at least on paper, the honour of sovereignty over Fort Gibraltar. Encompassing the old British territory and a sliver of Andalucía that was saved as the Iberian Peninsula fell in 1927, it is a vital link to South Italy and the Free Mediterranean at large; most of the original Spanish inhabitants long fled for safer shorts however, resulting in a predominant Anglo-Canadian populace. It is also a crucial keystone for the Red Curtain: a joint defense boundary protected in cooperation with the Commonwealth’s traitorous New Austrian, Italian, American and Gran Patagonian allies that was originally established in 1940 not long after the final collapse of Iceland. With the Reactionary “League of Neutral Defiance” more content to withdraw into their authoritarian domains, it fell upon the monarchies and republics of the Free World to keep the Reds from overrunning what was left of Western Europe. Since the Liberation of Britain in 1944, Fort Gibraltar has thus served as a hub for espionage, naval patrols, aerial surveillance and orbital relays while hosting a formidable network of fortresses. All these intended to intimidate – and protect this small enclave from – the Reds as well as contain them.

    Indeed, beyond the border lies the vast expanse of the Collectivist Internationale. Since its emergence in the 1920s, it has been at a state of war with the Free World – and by its dogma it has always been at war with the Free World. Much of what is known of that graveyard of Lost Nations come from intelligence reports, scattered diplomatic missions and the dwindling number of so-called “unpersons:” dissidents, reformists and general malcontents deemed a threat by the omnipresent Party. Although various rebellions and uprisings were known to have occurred in the past, it is unknown whether such groups still exist save for internal purges and infighting among Party cliques, suspected to be instigated by the Supreme Politburo. Suffice to say, to live in what has long been Red territory is, whether or not one is a “Party-ColMem” in ColStandard or among the throngs of proles, is to partake in one of the most twisted, dogmatic social experiments in history. Little remains of the cultures, histories, nationalities and heritage that once existed there if at all. Paris, Madrid, Berlin, Bern, Vienna, Budapest and many other cities lost forever save for what could be saved before the curtain closed on those realms. In place of what was destroyed, the Collectives have been remolding Europa in the image of their so-called Will of the Workers. All the while bolstering their strength close to the Curtain in No Man’s Lands, where entrenchments and occasional skirmishes occur amidst desolate ruin.



    Beyond that, all that can be said with certainty is that for all the Collectivists’ drive for continuing the Revolution that raged in the Terror, power over all mankind is paramount. Meanwhile, there are those in the Free World still longing to return to if not free ancestral homelands that no longer exist. The presence of Revivalists and those seeking to put an end to this endless Cold War in some manner wield significant presence in Government, be it in London or elsewhere. But since the rise of atomics and other powerful weapons however, deterrence has proven to be the most resilient and sane policy available. But as concerns have emerged of possible breaches in the Red Curtain around South Italy as well as aggressive activities being reported from across the Channel and elsewhere, some dread the possibility of impending global war, if not atomic annihilation. Nonetheless, barring drastic, large-scale changes or a boot on our faces forever, the status quo in Western Europe is expected to continue for the foreseeable future.

    I bloody hope so.

    P.S. You never did forgive me, Arthur, even when Matthew did. Perhaps it may be for the best. – Fraulein F.

    - “The Cambridge Journal of Contemporary Affairs.” United Kingdom. 2015.

    ----​

    As a bit of trivia, as with the earlier maps I tried to incorporate elements of real history into the context of the 'verse. The references to the "Invasion" and "Liberation" of Britain in 1942-44 are from these maps:

    fav.me/d30xqp6
    fav.me/d30j9e3

    Which also explain in part the "bittersweet" triumph that left the UK in shambles as well as calling back to New Austria's darker moments. And why the British remain rather upset with their New Austrian "allies." At the same time however, notice the in-verse text. As it not just references the state of the U.K. and South Italy, but also highlights some aspects of the continent-spanning Collectivist Internationale, which occupies much of the Old World since the Terror in that world's 1920s. Given how the "Eternal" Cold War pans out, the map likewise highlights how the darkening situation there becomes more and more reminiscent of a certain book from George Orwell called 1984. With implications that the "Reds" might be doing that on purpose. As though someone is pulling their strings even if there seems to be no explicit evidence...so far.

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  11. Threadmarks: The New World (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    The Contemporary New World: An Introduction

    Nearly a century on from when the Terror shook the world, the North and South American continents have held firm as a shining beacon for the Free World as a whole. In fact, the New World is notable not just for hosting the Vatican-in-Exile. For, with the exception of Reactionary Australia and island states like the Empire of Japan, it one of the handful of regions left where the Collectivist Internationale does not predominate. It is little surprise, therefore, that many of the leading powers among the Free Nations are based from here, holding on to their way of life against a persistent foe.

    North America, in particular is, host to two of the most prominent of the remaining royalist powers. Through the House of Windsor-Romanov, the remnants of the old British Empire continue to thrive in spite of it all. The Loyalist Dominion of Canada, in particular, has long taken the place of its brothers "across the pond" as the heart of the British Imperial Commonwealth, where the sun still refuses to set. Further south, the Royal Dominion of New Austria under the Habsburg "Throne-in-Exile" stands resolute. A living blend of New World glory and Old World heritage, its people both stand fast in revering and surpassing their lost ancestral homelands. All the while, the mighty American Federation boasts, though not without reason, its pretensions as a powerful bastion of freedom and democracy. As proud, if not paranoid, its citizenry may be, few would doubt their commitment to keeping the spirit of their "Founding Fathers" alive.

    South America, meanwhile, is presently dominated by the republican powerhouse that is Gran Patagonia. Mirroring their American counterparts, its citizens have come to see themselves as upholding "Latin Republicanism" and are adamant in defending it at any cost. Neighboring it is the Legitimate Union of Brazil, a nominally royalist nation under a "Military Interregnum" that seems as beholden to the legitimacy bestowed by the Gran Patagonians as it is committed to restoring order. An enduring remnant of Portuguese power, its people still strive to hold fast to their independence and dignity, however hard it may be to escape their old rival's shadow. While these two powers have helped keep the Collectivists in the New World contained, the last vestiges of the old Latin Alliance hang on through the defiant Republic of Colombia. Though led by Reactionaries claiming Bolivar's legacy, Colombians remain firm in upholding their freedom.

    Despite a hundred years of struggle and pain, there is little question that the light of the New World, through its myriad nations and diverse cultures, is still as strong as ever. Through their efforts, those of their allies across the Free World and even, to a degree, the Reactionaries who make up the "League of Neutral Defiance," they have held the line, be it with valour or ignoble means. Many of these countries, for all their ideological and political differences, have found greater amity over the years. Indeed, for them to both push forward and carry on the legacies of the so-called "Lost Nations," whether in the streets of New Vienna or the halls of Montreal, in many ways is a victory over the ever-present threat of Collectivism.

    Such triumphs, however, are not ones taken lightly. History has shown that even the Americas are not as safe as they appear. All it may take is for one country to fall apart or so much a moment's lapse in vigilance, for the Internationale to finally fulfill its World Revolution in the name of the Will.

    - "From the New World: A History of the Free Nations Volume 3: After the Terror." Loyalist Canada. 2022 Edition.

    ----​

    For a bit of trivia, some of the placenames are references to some of the earlier canon maps, such as those for New Austria and Loyalist Canada.

    The map's overall layout is meant, in part, to be a reference to the The New World 2024: RDNA-verse map from 2013, of which this is a remake of, and even uses some of the lore from it. But on top of compiling as much of the recent material as possible onto one work, this was also a good opportunity to really highlight the setting from a broader perspective. Granted, being a "general" overview, it's not quite as detailed as the dedicated maps for North and South America respectively, the results, should, hopefully, speak for themselves.

    And yes, elements from the various "canon" maps shown previously are here in some form or another. As well as the return of a certain Agency...

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  12. Threadmarks: The Presidents of the American Federation (c.2020)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    On the Contemporary American Federation

    ...Similarly to the Loyalist Dominion of Canada, the Americans bear the legacy of British law and governance, including the Magna Carta. What makes them stand out, however, is how they had taken that inheritance, transformed it, and through their Constitution, created a form of "Republican Democracy." The A.F. is largely comprised of 48 States and a number of special Territories united under one flag, as well as a network of Protectorates and allies. The oldest States could be traced back to the original Thirteen Colonies that rebelled against the British, with many of the subsequent ones being founded by either Anglophone colonists, rugged frontiersmen or immigrant settlers. The Federal Congress in Franklinton, F.D.C. serves as the legislature (split between the Senate and House of Representatives), which is counterbalanced by the executive and judiciary. The head of state is the President, who is elected every four years through an Electoral College, whereas other political figures such as Senators and Governors are voted in through direct, popular means. The system is not without its flaws, which Revivalists and myriad lobbyists have used to exert growing influence, to say nothing of the extents made to curb any potential Collectivist threat. Nonetheless, it's proven itself resilient time and again, even in the face of the Liberty Party and more extreme New American Party breaking the previous informal dominance of the two Federalist offshoots (the "Whigs" and "Republicans"). This extends to a firm commitment in upholding the Constitution, its timeless words and assorted Amendments keeping it a living icon as relevant now as in the days of the Founding Fathers. Thus, its claims of being the prime bastion of democracy, alongside Gran Patagonia in South America, are far from hollow.

    Its posturing as an industrial and economic power are nothing to scoff at, either. A combination of bountiful natural resources, rugged frontier-influenced individualism, a work ethic derived from Protestant virtues and a pervasive mindset championing technical innovation have made the A.F. among the most self-sufficient of the Free Nations. Americans by and large take pride in their industries and specialties, be the bustling coal mines of Virginia and Appalachia, the "Factory Belt" stretching from Ohio to Superior-Wisconsin, the vast farmlands throughout the Great Plains, or the media companies that call New York and Cascadia home to name a few. Then, there is America's ambitious space program, a joint production between its National Aerospace Agency and various private enterprises that has allowed it to establish an orbital presence and even traverse the Lunar surface.

    Then, there are the over 309 Million people who call America home. Owing to history, it's undeniably a nation of immigrants and settlers similar to yet unique from its Canadian counterpart. The majority of the population is classified as White, albeit split between "Anglo" (those who could trace their lineage back to either the original Colonies or the British Isles in some form) and "Non-Anglo" Europeans (whether descended from earlier colonists or refugees after the Terror). The remainder, meanwhile, is comprised of indigenous "Native Indians/American Indians" (the equivalent of Loyalist Canada's First Nations), Blacks (whether descended from slaves or freemen) and other "Coloreds" like the Orientals in Cascadia. Resolving tensions and discrimination among such a variety of ethnic backgrounds took generations of at times sporadic reform, be it granting equal rights to Blacks or overcoming long-held hostility against the tribes. This isn't to ignore how informal stigma still persists to some degree, especially with regards to mixed-race and Non-Anglo Whites like the "Slavics" (be it over their Revivalist tendencies or reluctance to fully assimilate), as well as overt discrimination certain foreigners (with New Austrians still having derisive monikers like "Mongrel Krauts"). Americans, however, have gone far in making the melting pot ideal of "Out of many, one" closer to reality, be it through equality of opportunity and the unifying use of English in its myriad "American Standard" variations. All bound together by a sense of patriotism, religiosity (primarily of the Judaeo-Christian variety), common culture and an opposition to the spread of Collectivism.

    Even with the clear and present danger posed by the Reds, it is little surprise that one of the nation's traditional Latin mottoes, Per aspera ad astra ("Through adversity, to the stars"), has taken more relevance than the Founding Fathers ever imagined.

    - Snippet from "The Westinghouse Atlas of the New World." American Federation. 2023 Edition.

    ----​

    For added reference, many of images used for the presidents are based of various American congressmen, senators and governors from the mid-20th Century. For instance, Eugene Long, the founder of the Liberty Party is pretty much the (in)famous Huey Long. Coincidentally, the Liberty Party itself is something of an amalgamation of Theodore Roosevelt's "Bull Moose" Party and Long's "Share the Wealth" subset of the Democrats. While current American Federation President Fritzgerald is based somewhat on US Senator Everett Dirksen.

    The photo used for Quentin E. Roosevelt is technically that of Kermit Roosevelt, who like Quentin was one of Theodore Roosevelt's children in real life.

    The images for the "Native Indian" presidents are those of Will Rogers Jr. and Benjamin Reifel respectively, who in real life actually were of Cherokee and Lakota/Sioux descent. While that of Catherine Lee Jackson is based on a younger photograph of Maurine Neuberger.


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  13. Threadmarks: The Three Crowns (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    The Three Crowns: General Introduction

    Of the various principles, systems and forms of government among the Free Nations, none baffles a considerable number of Americans and Gran Patagonians more than the notion of monarchy. Among the the oldest forms of governance still in use, if significantly reduced from before the Terror, it's all too easy for to those who highly cherish the ideals of liberty and democracy to dismiss as an obsolete mindset. Contrary to such views, however, not only is it significantly more varied and compatible to democratic notions than is often perceived, but it is also prospering in spite of Collectivism's sordid legacy. And few embody these more than the royalist realms comprising the so-called "Three Crowns."

    To understand this, it's wise to look into monarchy’s ability to adapt and find relevance amidst the changing tides of history. Signs of this abound across the globe, whether in the days of the Roman Empire and the constant reiterations of the Chinese Mandate of Heaven, or the ascension of the Holy Roman Empire and the signing of the Magna Carta. The more defining moments, arguably, occurred during the 18th and 19th Centuries. By then, as the ideals of republicanism continued to gain popularity in certain corners of the globe, it had gradually became apparent to the ruling dynasties that compromises had to be made to fulfill the needs of their subjects, share with them the responsibility of ruling their countries, and to keep unifying traditions relevant. While there were significant variations and methods, by and large they increasingly came to see their peoples as equals (whether under God or the law), with themselves as either their servants or representatives. Through reforms towards liberalization and democratization, the present foundations of Constitutional Monarchies solidified, which became the norm by the early 20th Century and would continue to evolve (such as the codification of absolute primogeniture in the 1950s-60s) in the decades after.

    The Three Crowns themselves reflect this. Strictly speaking, the term itself is a nickname for the peculiar yet amicably close dynamics between the Royal Dominion of New Austria, Loyalist Dominion of Canada and (traditionally) the Legitimate Union of Brazil, shared by both their respective sovereigns and their peoples. Known by various formal names like the "New Vienna-Montreal Pact" and "Royalist Compact," it evolved over the course of generations from the early settlers. Yet while it may have grown from the intermingling of colonial ventures, feudal commitments and dynastic ties, over the generations a sense of camaraderie, mutual respect and (despite differences in languages and religion) a sense of a common inheritance. This was shared not only by the nobility or the ruling monarchs themselves, but by the 19th Century, this was also present among their respective citizens. The chaos of the Terror, and with it the destruction of much of the old order (including the Austro-Hungarian Crownlands' "Mitteleuropa" and the dreams of a Lusophone union), would further accelerate if not cement this trend.

    Simultaneously reaffirming old traditions and forging a new destiny, these royalist powers have gone far in ensuring their survival as heirs to the Old World. Granted, Portuguese Brazil's standing as a great power is seen more as ceremonial and vestigial, especially in light of the "Military Interregnum" (the Braganzas' Lusitanian Brigandine Throne nominally vacant since 1992). Nonetheless, the Habsburgs and Windsor-Romanovs remain as popular and powerful as their respective realms, the historically close relationship between New Austrians and Loyalist Canadians having been rekindled since 1949. Indeed, their clout extends well across the Atlantic to the remaining royalists of Europe. Through the British Imperial Commonwealth, the United Kingdom remains steadfast, if worn-down, against the Collectivist Internationale. While on the fallen Continent, the fortress-state of South Italy, still under the similarly stubborn Savoia-Siracusas, continues to stand strong, even as more of its people find sanctuary in the Tunisian and Italian Greek territories. This is to say nothing of the enduring clout of the Vatican-in-Exile, as well as the crusaders of Malta.

    While these lands possess their own problems and are by no means immune to the troubles posed by the Terror's spawn, the present royalists of the Three Crowns remain vibrant partners in the international community: symbols of defiance and groundedness in a brave new world.

    - "The World Almanac of Nations." American Federation. 2023 Edition.

    ----

    For a bit of trivia, the flag and coat of arms used for South Italy have largely remained unchanged since at least 2015, even after all this time they still manage to hold up well.

    Some of the placenames are nods and references to the earliest bits of lore made for the setting.

    The photographs used for the sovereigns, more than being consistent with the the Wikiboxes, are also nods to both the general cultural aesthetic of the setting and some of real life history. Notably, the image used for Brazil's Regent-President Barbosa, though hearkening to the Cold War-era military dictatorship, based on Ernesto Geisel, one of the figures who set the stage for Brazil's eventual transition back to democracy. Which in-universe, mirrors Barbosa lifting some of the excesses of the ruling Junta.

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  14. Osk Eu set di la Oskaña

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    What is the racial breakdown of New Austria?
     
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  15. mdc_1957 Still present here

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    Manila, Philippines
    In terms of ancestry (for those in New Austria proper):
    • 35% Germanic (Austrian Germans, Swiss, etc.)
    • 28% Magyar
    • 28% Slavic (Poles, Czechs, etc.)
    • 15% Mesoamerikaner (e.g. Mayans, Zapotecs, etc.)
    Those numbers, however, also include mixed-race predominantly aligning with their more predominant ancestries. New Austrians aren't exactly particular about race compared to their American neighbors.

    EDIT: Polishing
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019 at 11:15 PM
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  16. GustavusAdolphus1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2017
    What about Hispanics/those descended from Spanish colonists?
     
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  17. mdc_1957 Still present here

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    They're pretty much in Kuba, which doesn't factor into those numbers. This in part due to its status as an "Autonomous Realm" and due to many of the Spanish colonists who would have settled in OTL New Spain/Mexico relocating there in the intervening generations. Though population wise:
    • 72% Spanish descent
    • 14% Germanic descent
    • 11% African descent
    • 3% Non-New Austrian descent (e.g. Asians, Americans, etc.)
    Similarly to New Austria, though, they also include mixed-race that align with their more predominant cultural or racial ancestries.
     
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  18. Threadmarks: The Twin Republics: America and Gran Patagonia (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

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    Manila, Philippines
    The Twin Republics: General Introduction

    Justice. Democracy. Solidarity. Liberty. Fraternity. Such are the inalienable principles shared by many republican Free Nations. Of these, the American Federation and Sovereign Federated Republic of Gran Patagonia stand out as among the most powerful, exemplifying these virtues in the face of both enemies and friends alike. Taking pride in their achievements, these prominent powers, informally dubbed the "Twin Republics" of the New World, see themselves rather than their royalist allies as the best hope for spreading liberty's triumph to all mankind.

    Notions of republicanism and democracy are by no means new. From the agorae of Ancient Greece and the halls of the Roman Senate, to the canals of Venice and the lost cantons of fallen Switzerland, the thought of the people themselves seeking their own destiny is one almost as old as that of monarchy. But for all such precedents and the spread of republican ideas across the civilized globe in the 18th Century, a pivotal moment came when the so-called Thirteen Colonies rebelled against the British Crown. With the Revolutionary War and subsequent Declaration of Independence in 1775, the newborn American Federation defied the odds and sought to prove that a nation by, of and for the everyman could stand proudly to kings and emperors. With the stalwart rebels against Spain soon following, other such republics would emerge in both the New World and Old. Though each followed their own path through the tides of history, many in their own way sought to further better themselves, with greater liberties and democratic reforms pushed by the dawn of the 20th Century and beyond. Many of them also, in one way or another, follow the example of Franklinton and Buenos Aires.

    More than their positions straddling North and South America, the so-called Twin Republics are also defined by the common bonds shared between Americans and Gran Patagonians. Trading, if illicit ties between the two "colonials" in the 18th Century gradually fostered a sense of solidarity and respect. Whether it's the "Republican Democracy" of the American Federation's "Founding Fathers" or the "Latin Republicanism" pioneered by the "Libertadores" of Gran Patagonia, that mutual understanding as equals only grew stronger with time. Be it among politicians or among the people themselves, each nation's desire to present themselves as beacons of true liberty compared to the royalists (known colloquially as the "Three Crowns"), would lead to the those diplomatic, economic and military links being bolstered even further. Not even the turmoil brought forth by the Terror, and the threat posed by the Collectivist Internationale, could break that friendship.

    Granted, the two republican powers don't always get along. Be it cultural differences (including the use of English versus Spanish) or the manner in which each nation responds to threats within and without, it can seem as if their competition with one another can be as heated and spirited as their lingering rivalries with their royalist allies among the Three Crowns. Nonetheless, it would be folly to challenge either of them. In terms of prosperity, armed might, stability or patriotism, the endurance of democracy and the common man's dedication to freedom remain unbowed. This is not to ignore the other defiant glimmers of republicanism elsewhere. Even in the face of Collectivists at their gates, the United African States (forged from the remnants of isolated European colonies) and Sovereign State of Free China stand firm against the dark. To say nothing of the successful intervention in Venezuela by both American and Gran Patagonian forces, saving the locals from both its crumbling Reactionary overlords and Collectivist militias, while bringing back the benefits of a proper democracy.

    That is not to say that there are no problems besetting them. Or that the extant of American paranoia and continuing suspicions of outside manipulations in Portuguese Brazil by Gran Patagonia, in spite of clear support for a proper republic by stalwart advocates, continue to remain a sour if unfounded criticism. Regardless, there remains a strong belief that such matters, especially when it comes to the Terror's legacy, can and have to be overcome. Thus, from the home front to the very edge of civilization, the Twin Republics continue to push forward, together holding on to the light of liberty. No matter the cost.

    - "The World Almanac of Nations." American Federation. 2023 Edition.

    ----​

    For some trivia, the Venezuelan flag is based on that of the real life United States of Venezuela around 1905-1930.

    This is a partial remake of sorts of the Liberty's Triumph: RDNA-verse map from 2011, though this one focuses exclusively on Americans and Gran Patagonians. More than retcons or overall polishing, making the map also gave me a chance to really flesh out the in-universe biases on top of the lore (both in the map itself and text). Especially as it's made rather evident that, for all the talk of freedom and democracy, both powers aren't entirely as peachy as they're trying to present themselves.

    The photographs used for the political leaders are also nods to both the general cultural aesthetic of the setting and some of real life history. Among others, the image used for Brazil's Regent-President Barbosa, though hearkening to the Cold War-era military dictatorship, is based on Ernesto Geisel, one of the figures who set the stage for Brazil's eventual transition back to democracy. Which in-universe, mirrors Barbosa lifting some of the excesses of the ruling Junta.

    For Gran Patagonia, there's a conscious effort not to go for the "usual" inspirations for the time period when it came to the images used. The President for instance is based on Francisco Manrique, who was in real life known for his more moderate views and opposition to Peron. While the Vice President is based somewhat on Jorge Alessandri of Chile.

    The peculiar inclusion of Brazil in the map, despite being nominally a royalist nation in the setting is intentional. As while it's not explicitly admittedly, it's heavily implied that Gran Patagonia (and by some extent the American Federation) are manipulating the situation there to prop up both the military dictatorship (ostensibly to maintain order) and republican sentiment to eventually depose any lingering monarchist elements. In a sense mirroring various activities and covert operations in the New World during the Cold War.

    The Sol de la Republica is the Sol de Mayo or Sun of May, the national emblem of both Argentina and Uruguay in real life.

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  19. Threadmarks: The Free Republic of Australia/Reactionary Australia (c.2022)

    mdc_1957 Still present here

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    Reactionary Australia: General Introduction

    Situated in the Southern Hemisphere, Reactionary Australia, formally known as the Free Republic of Australia, is a something of a contradiction. It is simultaneously one of the leading powers among the Free Nations and stands apart from much of the Free World. This is in no small part due to it being the most powerful standard-bearer of Reactionarism and the dominant power behind the so-called "League of Neutral Defiance." Due to a well-trimmed propaganda machine and a stern isolationist policy, it does not necessarily follow that what is officially upheld matches up with reality in practice. Nonetheless, what is readily available from both local and foreign sources could be relied upon for useful information.

    Currently under President Edward Wellington-Mosley, the country remains firmly under the Sovereign People's Council, upholding the "Anglo-Mosleyite" form of the Reactionary mindset. It is comprised of 10 Federal States (compared to the seven recognized during the 1900 Federation Act), six Autonomous Communities and two Special Autonomous Districts. Although many institutions and policies from the Dominion and early independence years are nominally retained, with the National Parliament in Sydney still serving as the legislature, in practice all power is in the hands of the ruling regime. Although reforms since 1991 have led to greater liberties and social mobility, the ideology is pervasive in everyday life, from public conduct and regimented gender dynamics to enforced expectations that everyone contribute to society for the betterment of all, particularly with regards to the Free Australian Armed Forces. Life outside the Federal States, meanwhile, is said to be even more rigid and with greater military presence, among other less palatable rumors. Beyond simply the need for constant readiness, but also the notion, shared by other Reactionaries, that the Terror was enabled by the seeming decadence, if not degeneracy, of the Old World.

    The "Australians" who call their country home comprise a majority of the 27.7 million-strong population, who are considered in the prevailing doctrine as superior and "pure" compared to the rest of the Free World. That term, however, is only reserved for those primarily of Dutch and Anglo descent, be it from the original "settler-citizenry" or those who arrived during the Terror. Meanwhile, the "Coloureds," such as the native dark-skinned Aborigines and the Orientals, and others descended from European refugees comprise a sizable remainder that's all but separated from the rest of society. Although treated as an underclass in general (with many Aborigines confined to the Autonomous Communities), they are not excluded from the ideal known simply as the "Fair Go." A long-standing tradition incorporated by the regime, it states that anyone could strive to become "Honourary Australians" and be seen as true equals, though some in practice remain more equal. While it is difficult to make out reality from the propaganda, this has not stopped many among them from trying, especially in light of the reforms extending equality to all (at least on paper). Nor has Reactionary rule diluted the egalitarian and rugged spirit that has defined Australian culture for generations.

    Despite its predicament and relative isolationism, Reactionary Australia's clout is significant. As the de facto leader of the League of Neutral Defiance (especially with the declining fortunes of Southern Africa), it is the most vocal among the remaining Reactionaries in advocating for and spreading its ideology. Whether it's the "Bolivaristas" of Colombia, the "National-Reactionaries" of Ireland, the nascent "United Front" in the Kingdom of Joseon, Australian influence is in some form of another present. For, in addition to leading by example and in spite of its own Anglo-Mosleyite notions of superiority, it has also extended a form of the Fair Go to them, under the notion that all races can aspire to uphold their own greatness and purity. Inevitably, such efforts have led to tensions with other major powers, notably with the Loyalist Canadians and New Austrians, with the latter viewed as "impure mongrels" by the regime despite having the struggling United East Indies (a mixed-race and former Belgian-Dutch colonial remnant) as a protectorate. That the Sovereign People's Council has conceded to reforms, however, suggests that it is not above maintaining some semblance of cordial diplomacy with the rest of the Free World.

    In the regime's efforts to foster self-reliance and sever any lingering ties with the British Imperial Commonwealth, combined with the locals' rugged frontier traditions, the nation's economy has shown itself to be remarkably stable. Be it the factories dotting the coasts of New Wales and Cooksland, the much-vaunted wineries of Swan River or the multitude of refineries and irrigation projects in the interior, the citizenry of Australia are capable of sustaining themselves. That same industriousness, combined with a martial mindset, also fuels the F.A.A.F., considered even by the Free World as a potent force to be reckoned with. Though seen partly as a means to maintain the power of the ruling Council, it has played a decisive role in preventing the Collectivist Internationale from fully subduing the Pacific. Thus, it is not for nothing that other Reactionaries, in all their myriad manifestations, seek to emulate its example.
    Although there are issues over the country's long-term stability and the lengths being taken by the regime to remain in power, there is little doubt on Reactionary Australia's willingness to defy the Collectivists in its midst. For they are always at war.

    Basic History of Reactionary Australia

    Although about three million square miles in size and inhabited by the native Aborigine tribes for about 50,000 years, the Australian landmass had largely been uncharted territory for countless generations. It would not be until the discovery of what is now the New Holland coast and Carstensz Gulf by a Dutchman named Willem Janszoon in 1603 that the continent began attracting the outside world. Further naval explorations, however sporadic, were undertaken by the Dutch over the next several decades, mapping more of the expanse before them. Scattered outposts were gradually established, by the 1710s stretching as far south as present-day Willemsland. Their relative distance even from the colonial center of Batavia meant that the traders and fishermen who lived in those settlements (later deemed the first of the "settler-citizenry") were largely forgotten and left to fend for themselves, cultivating a frontier mindset that would have lasting consequences.

    With the expeditions of the famed explorer James Cook in the late 18th Century, the destiny of what was by then known as "Terra Australis" would be changed even further. With Cook claiming the fertile lands later known as Cooksland and New Wales for Great Britain in 1772 (soon extending to the entire continent), any concerns of potential international disputes were rendered moot with the Dutch ceding their loose grip over the budding towns further north, which the local colonists welcomed at any rate. The loss of the Thirteen Colonies and subsequent independence of the American Federation, however, made the newfound frontier appealing to Parliament in London as a seemingly ideal location with which to send criminals slated for indentured servitude. Thus, a fleet of convicts arrived off Botany Bay in 1788, founding the first of many penal colonies and the city of Sydney. By the early 19th Century, these hardened would-be prisoners were followed by farmers, herders and other pioneers seeking a new life from the British Isles.

    As the population expanded, both along the coasts and further inland, they found more than new farmland or prospective homes. New opportunities for homesteading, mining and industrialization presented themselves, especially with the discovery of gold and other ores in the 1840s. They also began facing greater challenges, be it from the so-called Outback itself (including its wildlife), growing tensions with the Aborigine tribes, or from the perceived corruption of men representing the distant British Crown. Amidst hardships and occasional uprisings (including the Miners' Revolt of 1851), however, the Dutch and Anglo elements became ever more intertwined. Increasingly, even as more landed from across the seas, the settlers saw themselves no longer as simply the children of convicts, traders and laborers, let alone subjects of far-off London. The notions of an "Australian" identity had taken a recognizable form, one that took pride on their rugged mindsets and found any outside interference as a danger to their way of life. The denizens of British Maoriland soon became a peculiar exception to such norms, be it as fellow colonials or by the 1880s, as a sister nation.

    Towards the end of the 19th Century, colonies such as New Wales, Cooksland, Willemsland and New Holland had not only achieved "Responsible Government" and seen a significant degree of prosperity. But as prestige rose, so did a clamor from across the continent, even from the Oriental and Aborigines, for unifying the patchwork of territories under one banner. Thus, after much debate, the Federation Act was passed in 1900, which not simply formalized Australia as a Dominion, but granted the young nation ever greater autonomy, which seemingly suited all parties involved. For a time, the country seemed to look forward to facing the wider world on its own terms, all the while its ties with British Maoriland (which became a Dominion in 1905) continued to deepen. Then, came the Terror.

    Although the Federal Dominion of Australia feigned allegiance to the Crown for a time, it became evident as early as 1921 that it was hollow posturing at best, with few wishing to get involved in affairs half-way across the world. In Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere, some scholars and politicians entertained the idea of taking the country's isolationism even further as a deterrent, debates over which soon being overshadowed by demagogues with more radical answers to the rapid spread of Collectivism, espousing what was soon called Reactionarism. At any rate, after pressure both from the public and National Parliament, an independent republic was declared in 1926. Although British Maoriland remained nominally loyal, the bond between the two nations held firm. But as more people from both Europe and the Orient (including Indians and Chinamen) continued to flow into the continent, seeking to escape the so-called "Red tide" by crumbling homelands, whatever hopes Australians had of quietly weathering through the chaos were dashed.

    Amidst the brewing turmoil rose an Englishman named Sir Oswald Mosley. A disgraced baron turned firebrand and one of the ignoble founders of Reactionarism, he initially sought exile in Southern Africa in the mid-1920s before crossing the Indian Ocean to the struggling republic. As many of the local demagogues were followers of his views ("Anglo-Mosleyites" in later years), it didn't take long for him to assume power over the nascent Sovereign Australian Front (the current Sovereign People's Council), becoming one of the most powerful figures in the country. Whether it was Sydney, Eylandt, Melbourne or Port Stirling, he attracted crowds as he argued passionately on how it was failure of the decadent old order that allowed the Terror to happen in the first place, and that the Australians, in their purity and isolationism, deserve a better future. It would be the ignoble fall of British Maoriland to militias backed by the Collectivist Internationale in 1932, despite the best efforts of its sibling nation, that provided a decisive blow to legitimacy of President William Forster, with accusations of pro-Commonwealth sympathies. Thus, sparked the Sovereign Revolution, in which Mosley and his supporters, especially those in the military, assumed power. The Free Republic of Australia was proclaimed that year, with widespread applause according to propaganda. Almost immediately, the Council went to work remaking the country in its image, with ports closed to the "degenerates" and the newly christened F.A.A.F. emboldened.

    The next few decades were a trying time. Whether it was securing the remnants of scattered protectorates and former colonies, fending off raiding attempts by Collectivists or laying down the groundwork for the League of Neutral Defiance (alongside the "Afrikaner-Mosleyites" of Southern Africa), Reactionary Australia sought as hard as it could to bolster its place in the world. Then came the failed anti-Reactionary uprisings in Western Australia in the mid-1940s, resulting in its partition in 1948. This was not to ignore the at times violent protests in the 1950s, especially as more "Non-Honourary Coloureds" (including certain Aborigines) were relocated to the Autonomous Communities. Mosley himself did see his plans fully realized, dying in 1961, though his descendants would often assume the presidency. Yet in a strange mirror to the past, his vision proved, and continues to prove, to be as sturdy as the Australians themselves.

    In more recent times, the nation has sought to meet the criticisms and challenges posed by the rest of the Free World. Still, even with the reforms enacted, it's believed that, more than generations of ideological engineering, so long as the ever-present danger of the Internationale remains, the ruling regime is not likely to fade away for the foreseeable future, to the dismay of some. That the scars left by the fall of British Maoriland all those years ago remain deeply embedded in the cultural milieu as a constant reminder of what could happen, further reinforced by doctrine, is also known to play a major part in helping keep the people in line. For some, it could seem as though it happened only yesterday.

    - "The World Almanac of Nations." American Federation. 2023 Edition.

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    For some added trivia, some of the placenames used for the states are not only archaic forms of their real life incarnations, but are also references to an ultimately rejected 1838 proposal for Australia's divisions.

    A direct, if distant remake of the Australia 2014: RDNA-verse map from 2010, it's been significantly retconned and overhauled to fit in with the setting much better. I also used the opportunity to really fine-tune and elaborate on the nature of Reactionarism (as that setting's sort-of equivalent to fascism and other hard-authoritarian regimes) and why that world's Australians come off as aloof and confrontational with the rest of the Free World. All the while further driving home some of the more Orwellian influences.

    A number of the other placenames are also nods to explorers and pioneers from Australia's past. Apart from Cook, there's Jan Carstenszoon (with Carstensz Gulf named in his honor) and the the Archer brothers, who in real life played a role in founding settlements in Queensland, among others.

    While, Oswald Mosley might seem like an unlikely figure to pop up in this alternate TL (though as among the founders of Reactionarism rather than British Fascism as in real life), he wasn't the only one to bear that name. His background as a disgraced baron is also based on his background as part of the nobility.

    Coincidentally, "Anglo-Mosleyite" Reactionarism, though "successful" by the standards of Reactionaries, isn't the most pleasant of non-Collectivist ideologies, to put it lightly. Especially as some elements call to mind influences as varied as radical puritanism and apartheid, which further paints the regime's "assimilation" of Australian traits like the "Fair Go" in a darker light.

    Many of the names used involving the Autonomous Communities, and their general locations, are based on Aboriginal Australian territories and spheres of influence.

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