The Rainbow. A World War One on Canada's West Coast Timeline

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by YYJ, Jun 14, 2019.

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  1. YYJ Well-Known Member

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    Apr 4, 2019
    The Camosun only had a few second to react, before the Nürnberg starts jamming. They are unlikely to get a QQQQ message off on the wireless. They might start to send a message that there has been a collision.

    There was Union Steamship Company of New Zealand. You are right that Von Schönberg over committed, he gave the order to ram before he knew the provenance of the ship.
     
  2. YYJ Well-Known Member

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    Apr 4, 2019
    I don't have any specs for the efficacy of the ram bow on Königsberg class cruiser, but it looks pretty rammy.
    [​IMG]

    The bow of the Bremen class Leipzig looks even rammier.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Threadmarks: The best show

    YYJ Well-Known Member

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    Apr 4, 2019
    Aug 17, 0830. SMS Nürnberg, Observatory Inlet.

    A boarding party of 30 sailors ran up the cruiser’s foredeck, and stepped over the shattered railing straight onto the foredeck of the Camosun. Passengers and crew were running out onto the decks in various states of concern or panic. Details of the Camosun’s crewmen began taking the covers off the steamer’s lifeboats. A section of the boarding party dashed up two decks of ladders and stormed the bridge within 30 seconds. The horn ceased blasting. Von Schönberg sent a second 20 man party aboard, when he saw how many passengers had come out on deck. The German sailors moved through the ship, herding the passengers and taking control of the machinery spaces. The wireless office was quickly vandalized. The captain of the Camosun took much convincing to come about to understanding that the crisis he faced was not the collision itself, but in fact capture by a hostile navy.

    There was a tense moment when a section of armed sailors encountered a group of 28 men in uniform, who were in the process of hiding bulky metallic gear under their jackets and beneath the bench seats. The quick thinking of the Petty Officer in charge prevented a tragedy, when he realized the men were not soldiers, but actually a brass band. The petty officer learned they were from Kincolith, on their way to a concert with other local brass bands near the city of Prince Rupert. The bandsmen had read the situation accurately and had been trying to conceal their precious instruments from the marauding bandits. Once the band realized that their instruments were not in danger of being stolen, they cheered up, and invited the Germans to come to the performance. They were confident that they would give the best show at the event, much better than Port Simpson or Metlakatla. Apparently the completion between the local Indian reserve brass bands was quite fierce. Most of the other passengers on the Camosun were friends and relations of the band, come to watch the performance and socialize.

    This was wonderful, agreed the petty officer, but it was time to move across to the Nürnberg now, regrettably, because the war made it necessary to sink the Camosun. He gave his word that the passengers would be delivered to their destination with as little delay as possible.

    Passengers and crew filed across the causeway formed by Nürnberg’s bow. All counted there were 36 crew members and 112 passengers, mostly from Kincolith and bound for the band concert. The musicians clutched their instruments tightly. The boarding party inspected the Camosun and found she was taking water into her forward hold, but was not in imminent danger of sinking. They remedied this by opening all the watertight doors, turning the sea cocks, and planting scuttling charges. They set long fuses, so that Nürnberg could be certain of getting free before Camosun was sunk.

    Von Schönberg had Nürnberg’s forwardmost compartments inspected, and was assured the cruiser was taking on no water from the ramming. “Full astern,” he ordered. There was a screeching of metal, the Nurnberg shuddered, and the Camosun started to develop a bit of a bow wave on its near waterline, as she was pulled sideways by the Nürnberg’s powerful machinery. Then, with another screeching of metal, the cruiser broke free.

    Von Schönberg looked about. He had lost track of the Prince Rupert. There sounded the blast of a horn. There she was, at his port beam, just a shadow at the limit of visibility. She was flashing her Morse light very rapidly. Prince Rupert’s horn sounded again, then repeated constantly as if sounding a collision warning. Something was wrong.

    “Sound foghorn!” he ordered on a hunch. The horn blasted. The echo came back instantaneously. A shadow loomed to their starboard. The Camosun, being carried along by the tide current to his starboard, shuddered, straightened again, then collided with a rocky cliff topped with giant overhanging trees that had suddenly loomed out of the fog.

    “Full astern!” ordered Von Schönberg. The engines laboured in reverse, but Nürnberg still had forward momentum. He looked to port, towards the Prince Rupert, and saw a rocky island passing on their port side.

    “Sound collision alarm!” ordered Von Schönberg, but everyone fell over anyway, as the Nürnberg came to a sudden stop.

    Nürnberg had run aground.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
  4. NHBL Long Time Member, CMII

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    Jan 1, 2004
    That is an interesting twist, and from what I understand, quite plausible in these waters. Now it gets interesting. I would say that Nürnberg has more than repaid the investment in her, even if her journey ends here. If they have to abandon, best to be away from Anyox...
     
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  5. Spencersj345.346 Well-Known Member

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    Mar 19, 2018
    If they can't get her off the rocks in condition that enables her to be seaworthy they can blow her up, transfer over to the Prince Rupert, and head to the US to be interned
     
  6. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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    thunder bay,canada
    assuming of course the Prince Rupert isn t aground.Should be able to float her off within six hours........if there aren t too many holes.
     
  7. Cryhavoc101 Well-Known Member

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    I told you all before - Germany warships and Fjords....they just don't get along!
     
  8. NHBL Long Time Member, CMII

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    Exactly--a lot like never ejecting over the place that you've just bombed.
     
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  9. YYJ Well-Known Member

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  10. Driftless Geezer

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    Out in the Driftless Area
    ;):openedeyewink:
     
  11. Driftless Geezer

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    Location:
    Out in the Driftless Area
  12. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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    thunder bay,canada
    i have the feeling the Nurnberg and company have just met the acquaintance of Truro island and Nob Islet.
     
  13. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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    seems i am on the wrong side of the channel and too far down........it is foggy out.......
     
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  14. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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  15. YYJ Well-Known Member

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    Apr 4, 2019
    Mariners familiar with the channel might insist that the navigational hazards actually move themselves around.
     
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  16. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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    thunder bay,canada
    oh joy.......why can t we all use the same standard for coordinates......grrrrrr
     
  17. alfredtuomi Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    thunder bay,canada
    google is using just degrees while garmin uses degrees and minutes.........grrrrrrr.......now i wonder why accidents still happen.
     
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  18. Threadmarks: The Brave Boys of Anyox part 6

    YYJ Well-Known Member

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    Apr 4, 2019
    Aug 17, 1000, Ksi Gwinhat’al Valley, Near Alice Arm BC

    Some of the open meadow around the lakes was marshy, but some was hard and clear enough for the mule to get up to a trot. The boys were covering ground quickly. Neither boy had a watch, but Magnus figured it was about recess time, or around 10 AM when they got hungry. They halted on the shore of the biggest lake so far, maybe 100 yards across and three times as long. In the shade of a big evergreen they ate the lunches Mrs. Evindsen had packed, finished their ginger beer, and filled the bottles up with creek water. The mule drank water and ate grass and shrubbery.

    South of the lake they were back in the forest, and here they discovered a faint trail. It followed a level route, with a creek running beside them to their right and far below. Under the trees the air was cool.

    “Zach, when we get to the river, where do we get help?” asked Magnus. It was the first thing he had really said all morning.

    “Umm, I don’t know,” answered Zacharias. “They’re not my people. I’ve never been there.

    Magnus had not asked Zacharias much about his life before Anyox, now he realized that he was embarrassed to not know this about his friend. “Not your people?” he asked.

    “Me and my mom are Tsimshian. The people of the Nass River are Nisga’a.”

    “But you’re all Indians…”

    “Yeah, and the British and Germans are all Europeans.”

    “OK… Are all your neighbours like the Germans?”

    “Huh, I never thought of it like that,” said Zacharias. “I guess the Haida, for sure, the Nisga’a sometimes. But the Germans aren’t at war with everybody all the time either. It’s different now that the missionaries are here. But everybody has long memories.”

    “Can you speak to Nisga’a?” asked Magnus.

    “Pretty much, but they can tell who I am the first word I say. I think its like Norwegian and Swedish, or Danish.”

    “Yeah, I can kind of understand those, but I tried to talk to an Icelander once, and I got a headache right away. Everyone can speak English now can’t they?”

    “Depends how old they are, and if they want to.”

    “If they want to?”

    “Some people are proud, and they don’t like to have to speak someone else’s language in their own land.”

    Magnus felt like someone had pulled away a curtain, and he was seeing things for the first time that were very close, but had remained invisible. The two boys retreated into their thoughts for a while. The trail took a dip, and then descended. After a few minutes it became clear that they were headed down out of the high mountains, although they could not see far beyond the next tree. They descended for half an hour, and saw a small lake off beside their path. They cut through the forest to reach it. The mule drank long and deep from the lake.

    “Are you hungry?” asked Zacharias.

    “A little, but that miner food is disgusting.” Magnus pantomimed a miner eating his can of beans and bully beef. “Nom. Nom. Nom.” The two boys cracked up laughing.

    “I kinda like bully beef,” said Zacharias.

    “Nom. Nom. Nom.” said Magnus.

    They cracked up again.

    “Are you going to open a tin?” asked Magnus.

    “No way. I’m not that hungry.”

    The boys rounded up the mule, and swung up on her again. The trail continued downhill. In another 20 minutes or so they entered a clearing. The clearing was swampy, like a small lake that had all filled in with silt. Around the edges were prolific salmonberry patches. Through the break in the trees the boys could see a towering wall of snowcapped mountains, including one with its own glacier. The sunlight was dazzling after all the time under the forest canopy.

    “All those mountains must be on the other side of the river,” said Zacharias. “ I think we’re getting close.” The mule shied. Above the sound of the birds and bugs, there was another sound across the swamp. They could see the berry bushes shaking.

    “I think that’s a bear,” whispered Magnus. The mule was snorting and stamping. A black head appeared over the berry bushes at the downhill end of the clearing.

    “Yep. Don’t worry girl.” Magnus said, stroking the mule. “We’re going to leave right now.” He tried to use the reigns to get the mule to turn. Instead she reared up on her hind legs, dumping Magnus, Zacharias, and their saddle bags onto the wet ground. She ran back the way they came, and there was a powerful crashing through the underbrush behind her, a brownish, greyish blur in the shrubs. The mule galloped back into the trees and out of sight, and they could hear her hoof beats fading away for a while. What remained was a grunting, a sniffing, and then at the uphill side of the clearing, the upper body of an adult grizzly standing up out of the bushes. It started moving towards the boys. Zacharias picked up the bags of supplies and draped them over his shoulders.

    There was one tall pine tree in the middle of the clearing. The grizzly sniffed at the boys, roared, and then charged.

    “Run!” yelled Zacharias, but Magnus was already running.

    Magnus was pretty fast at the school track meet. But he never ran as fast as this before. Zacharias was two steps behind him. They closed on the tree, but they could hear the grizzly close behind. A very ancient part of their brains told them to keep running rather than looking back. They were almost at the base of the tree when something black and furry pushed past Magnus.

    A black bear yearling hit the base of the tree at a full run, turned ninety degrees and ran up the tree to the very top. Magnus was steps behind the bear. Later, he didn’t remember how he climbed the tree, but he sure did, twenty, then thirty feet in the air. When he looked back, Zacharias was one branch below him.

    “Wow.” said Magnus, breathing hard. “Wow.”

    The grizzly bear on the ground below them stood on its hind legs and roared. The black bear in the tree above them bawled. The top of the tree was bending over from the black bear’s weight. It was a stand off. Things stayed this way for far too long.
     
  19. Oldbill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2015
    Yep. Bears. Reminds me of my days in Kodiak. Never, ever leave home without a gun. :)
    And the part about the different tribes, and relating it all to Germans and British are all the same, because they are all Europeans, VERY well done.
     
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  20. generalurist Map Staring Expert

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    Dec 21, 2013
    Goes to show, even when you're trying to save your coastline from the huns you still have to worry about the local wildlife.

    Makes you wonder how many times history changed just because some messenger lost to time had a bad run in with a bear or venomous snake.
     
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