The Plague of 1482: The Year of the Setting Sun of York

As we are in England and John himself is a member of the royal family he would most likely be crowned as King jure uxoris together with Elizabeth and in any case would be styled as King of England as John II, while Elizabeth would have no numeral (at least until another Elizabeth became Queen regnant of England)
I did definitely consider having John as joint monarchs with Elizabeth, however, I think John would be content to be the true power behind the throne, while Elizabeth spends more time at home with her children. Perhaps such tragedy and trauma gives Elizabeth more of a backbone, and she remains the sole monarch. The idea of having Elizabeth’s cousins being heirs could also be a problem, especially with Margaret of Clarence, as we will see in the next installment. Elizabeth would not have a numeral you are correct, but there will be another Elizabeth on the throne someday, so for simplicities sake I kept her as Elizabeth I.
 
I did definitely consider having John as joint monarchs with Elizabeth, however, I think John would be content to be the true power behind the throne, while Elizabeth spends more time at home with her children. Perhaps such tragedy and trauma gives Elizabeth more of a backbone, and she remains the sole monarch. The idea of having Elizabeth’s cousins being heirs could also be a problem, especially with Margaret of Clarence, as we will see in the next installment. Elizabeth would not have a numeral you are correct, but there will be another Elizabeth on the throne someday, so for simplicities sake I kept her as Elizabeth I.
The point is NOT Elizabeth but the Council and tradition would dictate who John would take the title of King Consort (who would come with its numeral) meaning who he would stop to be King at Elizabeth’s death if she died first (and also John would most likely be the one to effectively rule BUT will do it in Elizabeth’s name)
 
The point is NOT Elizabeth but the Council and tradition would dictate who John would take the title of King Consort (who would come with its numeral) meaning who he would stop to be King at Elizabeth’s death if she died first (and also John would most likely be the one to effectively rule BUT will do it in Elizabeth’s name)
You are probably right. He is king-consort, but he will be refereed to as John II.
 
Chapter 14: The Nineteen Days King
OOC: I know this is a rather unlikely chapter, but I would not call it ASB by any means.

It was February 2, 1485. It was the day of the coronation of the first King-Consort of England, John de la Pole. Queen Elizabeth was in the early stages of her second pregnancy, and decided it would be better to have a coronation barge instead of a coronation ride. It would prove to be a nearly fatal mistake.

The exact details are sparse. Whatever truly happened the important thing was: the barge had sunk. The crowds of people, who were only trying to help, further complicated the mess. Most of the hands on deck had died, and Elizabeth and John were pulled out unconscious, but alive.

Immediately there was panic. Rumors spread that they were dead and/or that a Princess Mary had been killed. But who would take control? One man, recently added to the Privy Council would proclaim himself King. This man, Henry Tudor, would become the ‘nineteen days King’.

Immediately Tudor’s reign was doomed. The Privy Council refused to meet under his rule, and his supporters were few and far between. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Bourcheir, however, did support Tudor, and the plans for his coronation commenced.

A few hours after the incident, the Queen Elizabeth and King John awaken in the Tower of London, where they are being hidden to await their final destiny.

He betrothed himself to Margaret of Clarence on February 10, the same day Queen Elizabeth miscarried her second child. Having been forced to send a doctor to her, the sympathetic man, truly a Yorkist loyalist sent to replace the real doctor, manages to flee with the weak Elizabeth to Westminster Abbey, where they claim sanctuary.

The whereabouts of young Princess Mary were unknown at this time. Some suggested that Henry Tudor had killed her in the tower. This was actually untrue, the child having been hidden in the tower. It is unclear what Henry Tudor intended to do with Mary in the long run, though he clearly intended for John to be executed, and proclamations had already been prepared to announce Elizabeth’s death.

Elizabeth immediately gathered nobles, calling them to help her. In reality, the most of the nobility, particularly the old Yorkist families, had never supported Tudor, but had been quietly plotting to recover her throne. On the 21st Henry Tudor was imprisoned, ending the technical reign of the nineteen days King. John de la Pole, liberated from the tower, was very glad at what his wife had completed in his absence.

Elizabeth was said to have ‘wept for joy’ upon discovering that her daughter was safe, held comfortably in rooms in the tower, far separate from her parents.

Henry Tudor was executed on the 16th of March, and his mother Margaret Beaufort died of ‘pure melancholy’ on the 29th. He left only a daughter Margaret, who was wed to Thomas Howard and had eleven children.
 
Due this a yorkist timeline as majority of the timeline about the war of rose hence expect deux ex machines that get rid of nayvlancaterian claimant and a dumbing of Henry Tudor to act uncharacteristically since OTL tusor would never act without the support of. Umberbof novotlu and ensuring ot. I mean the man spent years in exile and in life was described as cautious and paranoid. But this is not our timeline so suspend disbelief.
 
Due this a yorkist timeline as majority of the timeline about the war of rose hence expect deux ex machines that get rid of nayvlancaterian claimant and a dumbing of Henry Tudor to act uncharacteristically since OTL tusor would never act without the support of. Umberbof novotlu and ensuring ot. I mean the man spent years in exile and in life was described as cautious and paranoid. But this is not our timeline so suspend disbelief.
1. Your paragraph barely makes sense so I hope I deciphered this correctly.
2. We have no clue how Henry would act in a scenario where he isn’t king, but clearly wants to be.
3. Henry was not paranoid until Elizabeth of York died in 1503, and since he is not even marrying her, he is not yet paranoid.
4. My reasoning behind this is that Henry Tudor honestly believed the King and Queen were dead, for a time, and thought he was doing the best thing for England by assuming the throne and betrothing himself to Margaret of Clarence.
 
Chapter 15: Cecily’s Time in Brittany
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Painting in 1484 showing Cecily with her infant son, Jean, as the Virgin Mary and the infant Christ

Cecily departed Sandwich on August 22, 1483. She was said to be nervous, and and sobbed uncontrollably. Upon arriving Francis though her gorgeous, but Cecily thought him old. Cecily wrote to her sister ‘He is old enough to be my father, I like him not’. They were married in November. Even though she did not like her husband, she knew her duty and was quickly pregnant. On September 1st, she delivered to the joy of Brittany (and Francis), a healthy son, christened Jean.

Tragically, her second son was stillborn on June 3, 1485.

Her sons death devastated her, and the couple became separated after an argument, which was possibly over Francis having a mistress. They did not reconcile until late 1486, around the time she fell pregnant again.

Her next childbirth was extremely taxing, and she was feverish and ill after the delivery. She also seems to have suffered from postpartum depression, as she became unresponsive to the outside world for 4 months. The baby was a healthy girl, named Cecile after her ailing mother.

After she recovered, she became extremely attached to the baby Cecile, and mended fences with her husband. They seemed to have grown close, and though there was never love, there was mutual appreciation.

Francis caught ill with pneumonia, and after a long and painful struggle died on January 8, 1490. Cecily was around 5 months pregnant at this time, and became (as Francis stated in his will) regent of Brittany. Cecily had developed an insatiable desire for history, and the once ‘dumb blonde’ [1] of the family had developed into a bookworm. Thus, when she delivered the final child of her husbands, a daughter, she named her Constance after the first English Duchess of Brittany [2]. To Cecily’s absolute devastation, little Cecile died after suffering an extremely high fever on August 17, 1490.

[1] Cecily’s handwriting was notorious sloppy in OTL, and she was most likely a poor student.
[2] Constance of Normandy, daughter of William I ‘The Conqueror’.
 
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Chapter 16: The Children of Cecily and Francis
Cecily of York (1469-) m. Francis, Duke of Brittany (1433-1490)
1. Jean, Duke of Brittany (1484-)
2. Stillborn Son (1485)
3. Cecile of Brittany (1487-1490)
4. Constance of Brittany (1490-)
 
Chapter 17: Maximilian’s Second Marriage
With the death of Archduke Maximilian’s first son, Philip, Duke of Burgundy, the heir to Austria was left heir-less. In 1483, Maximilian, though he was still devastated after the death of first wife, Mary of Burgundy, he began pursuing marriage.

His former step-mother-in-law wanted to betroth him to Elizabeth I of England, but Elizabeth declined, and Maximilian never gave his consent. He did peruse Cecily though by the time his ambassador arrived, she had been formally engaged to Francis of Brittany. With the next sister only being eight, he was forced to look away from England.

However, there was a lack of Royal brides. Both France and Spain had no suitable wives. Thus, he was forced to look within his fathers’ Holy Roman Empire. There he found Catherine of Saxony.

The betrothal was officially announced in April 1484, and in June the couple were married in person at Vienna.

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Catherine of Saxony, Queen of the Romans

Immediately the two hated each other. Maximilian though Catherine not as attractive or intelligent as Maximilian’s first wife, Mary of Burgundy. Catherine also though Maximilian unattractive, and when taken to Burgundy, she formed an instant dislike of little Duchess Margaret, even though the little girl was noted to be sweet, kind, and frequently asked to spend time with her ‘Lady Stepmother’.

Catherine also avoided her husbands affections, because of her overwhelming fear of becoming pregnant. However, she eventually succumbed to her husbands affections and fell pregnant. Shortly after finding out the news, Maximilian departed Ghent and travelled to Vienna. Catherine was noted to be weak and frail during the pregnancy, and upon arriving in Vienna miscarried a son sometime in May 1485.

Maximilian was saddened over this, but Catherine seemed unmoved. She reluctantly travelled with him to Aachen, where he was elected King of the Romans. She fell pregnant there again, but quickly miscarried in January 1486.

Maximilian returned to Burgundy, furious at his wife, and supposedly began petitioning for an annulment to the unhappy union. Maximilian, however, demanded Catherine return to Burgundy after six-year-old Margaret fell ill with a fever. While she survived, and it was likely nothing serious, Maximilian had been spooked, and wanted to have more children immediately.

She fell pregnant again but miscarried sometime before March 1487. Some also claim the she miscarried in fall, but the first source who states this wrote in the 1800s.

Her final child was conceived sometime in January 1488. This time there was little fanfare, as the court physicians had told Maximilian that it was unlikely Catherine would ever carry to term. Finally, she went into labor for the final time on August 2nd, 1488. The labor was very difficult, lasting for nearly three days. She finally gave birth to a son, who was sadly stillborn. A few hours later, Catherine died, allegedly having confessed to committing adultery with a butler. This story cannot be confirmed, but an investigation was conducted.

A small funeral was conducted and she was buried in an unremarkable tomb in Vienna. Maximilian mourned her very little.

Whatever the matter, Maximilian was still without a son.
 
Chapter 18: A Biography of Saint Margaret of Clarence
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Saint Margaret of Clarence, Abbess of Syon (b.1473;d.1532)

Saint Margaret of Clarence was born on August 14th, 1473, to George, Duke of Clarence, and his wife Isabel Neville. Her father was brother to King Edward IV, and her mother was the daughter and heiress of the Earl of Warwick, who had been one of the most powerful men in the country. Warwick had, however, made a foolish decision to switch over to the Lancastrians last minute, and had thus lost his prestigious place after his death in battle. Isabel Neville’s sister, Anne, had been married to the Lancastrian Prince of Wales, who was killed in battle. Anne would later marry Margaret’s uncle, Richard, Duke of Gloucester.

Margaret was joined by a brother, Edward, in 1475. Margaret, like any other noble girl of her age, was expected to marry, possibly to her double first cousin, Edward of Gloucester (b. 1473). However, Providence had other plans for her.

In 1476, Margaret lost her mother when she died from childbed fever after giving birth to a son, sickly Richard, who would perish not long after. Margaret would have been devastated, but had no idea her entire world was about to be turned upside down.

Her father, George of Clarence, went mad, accused a maid of poisoning his wife, and had her executed without a trial. Other treacherous actions necessitated Margaret’s father being imprisoned. He was executed, possibly by being drowned in a vat of wine, in February 1478.

In 1476, Margaret and her brother Edward were sent to live her her aunt and uncle, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester. The couple themselves had only one child, a son, Edward (b. 1473). These precious short years were probably the happiest of Margaret’s life.

Richard and Anne were very close to their niece and nephew, and they were treated as their own children. The Duchess of Gloucester herself failed to give birth to another child. She suffered two miscarriages, in 1475, and 1481, and had given birth to a stillborn daughter in 1478. We can imagine that Margaret tried to comfort her adoptive mother in these trying times.

In 1482, her life was once again shattered when her uncle, cousin, and brother, all died from the sweating sickness that decimated Europe in the early 1480s.

The Gloucester household was left bear, with only Dowager Duchess Anne and Lady Margaret left. The two remained incredibly close for their rest of Anne’s life.

Margaret and Anne attended the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I, and remained at court after that. Anne Neville considered entering a convent, possibly Bermondsey with her sister-in-law, Elizabeth Woodville, but Elizabeth arranged her marriage to Elizabeth’s spurned suitor, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond.

This man was descended from the Lancastrian branch of the Plantagenet family, and was technically Lancastrian heir. We have no record of what Henry and Margaret initially thought of each other, but we do know that Henry’s mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort, formed a bond with young Margaret, as the Saint would later reflect on her kindness.

Anne Neville died giving birth to a daughter, also named Margaret in early 1485. That same year, Henry Tudor, usurped the throne from the ailing Queen Elizabeth I and King-Consort John II.

The so-called “Henry VII” only reigned for nineteen days. It was not legal and he never held any real power. The only thing he actually accomplished was betrothing himself to young Margaret, who later wrote that she was terrified of marriage and childbirth. Henry was quickly executed.

Margaret of Clarence’s health declined after this traumatizing event. This, her betrothal to Tudor, and relevance as a possible rival to the throne caused both Queen Elizabeth and King John to worry excessively about her and be exceedingly careful deciding her fate.

It would only take one physician warning that childbirth would be unusually dangerous for Margaret, to prompt Queen Elizabeth I to dedicate her to a religious life. While initially entrusted to Bermondsey Abbey (where she stayed until the death of Elizabeth Woodville), she eventually settled at Syon Abbey.

Margaret would eventually be elected Abbess of Syon Abbey. She set it upon herself to weed out corruption.

She also devoted tireless hours to helping ‘orphans and widows in their distress’. She stayed completely out of politics and grew to love the monastic life, staying devoted to her Christian faith.

She died in 1532, at her convent, and was buried in a magnificent tomb, against her wishes. Six miracles, most of which involved healing, were attributed to her. In 1595, she was canonized as a saint by the Vatican.

Saint Margaret of Clarence should be remembered and celebrated for her courage in the face of trials, devotion to God, and steadfastness in spreading the Good News of Jesus Christ.

On her tombstone the following verse was engraved:

“Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful.”
  • Hebrews 10:23
 
I really would like to see a MB/EoY interaction ITTL. The sheer emotional turmoil
Real history actually seems to point out that Elizabeth of York and Margaret Beaufort were quite close and rather friendly with each other. They seem to have actually gotten together to present ideas to Henry, and Elizabeth had spent time with Margaret before she even married Henry. And they certainly both loved Henry VII and his children.
 
Real history actually seems to point out that Elizabeth of York and Margaret Beaufort were quite close and rather friendly with each other. They seem to have actually gotten together to present ideas to Henry, and Elizabeth had spent time with Margaret before she even married Henry. And they certainly both loved Henry VII and his children.
I said ITTL, where Henry is an usurper who got executed...
 
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