The Only Man in Prussia

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Colonel Troutstrangler, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Storms Over Paris

    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, they had everything before them, they had nothing before them, they were all going direct to Heaven, they were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the earlier period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. 1

    The City of Paris played host to a myriad of political idealists, opportunists and those with most to lose – they who held power today, and each idealist, opportunist and entrenched deputy, coveted the praises of a myriad of supporters, fanatics and hungry mobs. None of the supporters, fanatics and hungry mobs were entirely sure of the eventual outcome of the feuding protagonists, though each was certain that “their man” was the man for the job, whatever that job would be.

    For the way forward was not a clear path. One faction in Paris supported the evident might of “La Belle Jambe” General Bernadotte, supported as he was by a faction of the military establishment, though not by anyone higher than the rank of General of Division. Added to which was the fact that he commanded a sizeable force outside the walls of Paris. Not new to intrigue and back stabbing, Commanding the Army of the Vendee in 1801, his post gained him an opportunity to collude with the very opponents of the revolution he was sent to quell!

    Allied to him through intrigue and assignation, was the newly arrived General Pichegru. A hero of the revolutionary wars, he allowed his colleague Jourdan to be defeated, betrayed all his plans to the enemy, and took part in organizing a conspiracy for the return and crowning of Louis XVIII as King of France. The plans were suspected, and, when he offered his resignation to the Directory in October 1795, it promptly accepted. He retired in disgrace, but secured his election to the Council of Five Hundred in May 1797 as a leader of the Royalists. An eminently capable politician, speaker and intriguer, Bernadotte and Pichegru had been plotting Bonaparte’s demise, but their plans had been thrown to the wind by the First Consuls death in North Germany. Pichegru himself an ardent Royalist, was in league with George Cadoudal, the Vendean Catholic Royalist. These two were in turn plotting the demise of Bernadotte, now that Bernadotte wanted to see the “crown” of France on his own head. Pichegru was a well known figure in French politics, and would command a strong following, particularly in the south of France where the flame of the royalist cause still burned strong.

    The peace of the city was maintained in no small part by Generals Oudinot and Davout. Oudinot was an elected member of the Chamber of Deputies, and both were capable and heroic soldiers that were well respected by all for their deeds in the revolutionary wars. They were aided by the universally hated Fouché, himself a Senator and one time head of the police. They commanded most of the troops within the city, including the very loyal Consular Guard, of which both generals held personal commissions in the infantry regiments of that corps, being Colonel Generals of the Chasseurs and Grenadiers, respectively. Fouché commanded an enviable intelligence network, and little escaped his notice, especially if it related to Royalist intrigue and plot.

    Also within the city, and commanding a sizeable following within the army, was General Moreau. He had the tacit support of Davout’s party, as he promised the continuation of the republican ideals they had fought for, despite the rise of Bonaparte and his ambitions. Indeed, it was even said that if Bonaparte had not been Bonaparte, Moreau would have been! After the Battle of Hoenlinden he settled down to enjoy the fortune he had acquired during his campaigns. His wife collected around her all who were discontented with the aggrandisement of Bonaparte. This "Club Moreau" had annoyed Bonaparte, and encouraged the Royalists, but Moreau, though not unwilling to become a military dictator to restore the republic, would be no party to an intrigue for the restoration of Louis XVIII.2

    Outside of France, Queen Louise of Prussia, being very beautiful and very intelligent, had enticed the Queen Marie Josephine of France from her estate in Schleswig Holstein to Kassel, where she also had persuaded King Louis XVIII to arrive on the same week all the way from Warsaw. Much support was given by the Prussian Queen to the French Royal Household, and the arrival of both King and Queen in Kassel, was seen as an end to their public estrangement and more importantly, as their preparedness to recover their throne in Paris! A royalist call to arms had been issued, and the plans for a proposed royalist army was allowed to be created in that town. The Prince du Conde was rumoured to be on his way, and anticipated to arrive at any time!

    This news, together with the Austrians Grande Promenade of the Italian States prematurely forced the hands of the would be rulers of France in to action. By the end of September, battles had been fought, and the borders of the republic had been savagely breeched by the treacherous Austrians. Even Victor Emanuel I of Sardinia had rattled his sabre (egged on by his erstwhile cousins the King and Queen of the two Sicilies), demanding as he was, the return of his lands in Piedemont, and the neutrality of Switzeland. In this, it was said, support had been found in the Prussian Royal House, King Frederick William, though, was very vague on the subject saying “Victor who?” to which comment the Queen was seen to simply smile!

    The news of the Austrian invasion had caused many to play their hands prematurely. The plot to kill the First Consul was made public by Fouche, and the howl of indignation from the Republicans caused Bernadotte & Pichegru to attempt to deny their involvement. Fouche was cleverer than them, and “found” evidence and witnesses that implemented the two in the plot to oust Bonaparte, and they were promptly arrested on the charges of treason against the Republic. Pichegru somehow escaped his captors but Cadoudal and Bernadotte were to stand trial, with Cadoudal eventually sentenced to a long term in jail, Bernadotte, his high rank and central character in the plot, had betrayed himself and was sent to face the firing squad! Davout, it was, who made sure he kept his appointment with a party of Guardsmen at dawn on a rainy September morning.

    Meanwhile, the military situation was in need of a firm hand. Moreau grabed the reigns of the army and declared that he would be the saviour of the Republic. The assemblies met, and Moreau was declared Consul of France for a period of not less than two years. He was welcomed as equal by the other two Consuls. Fouché and Davout together, ensured that no dissenting voice was heard. The period after these events was to become known as the Quieting. Fouché was reported to have had shot over a thousand of the dissenters, an echo of his earlier career in the revolution.

    Morau issued orders for the mobilization of the armies around Paris, and from them formed “The Army of Germany” and set about crossing the Rhine into southern Germany to combat the Austrian encroachment into Bavaria. The French strategy being the same as that which brought to an end the War of the Second Coalition.

    General Andre Massena was given command of the smaller Army of Italy and gathered the disparate French forces already in the region to lead them in a third Italian campaign

    Talleyrand was given the task of neutralising Prussia. His skills were much needed for in the negotiations, the many Princes of north Germany were all determined to benefit from the coming settlements. His intention was to make the “Prussian problem” go away so that the French could concentrate on the southern threat from Austria and the Italian states.

    Given that France had invaded Hanover in the first place, it was generally taken that she would bear the brunt of the settlement. Refusing to cede lands on the left bank of the Rhine, Talleyrand offered Prussia the recognition of Prussia’s lead voice in the affairs of North Germany, usurping the control of the Empire.

    Additionally, a sum of money was to be paid to both Hanover and Prussia as compensation for their losses in the late war. Hanover was also given the smaller state of Aremburg bordering the Hanoverian lands and the Batavian Republic, for no other reason that they had claimed it, and occupied it. Possession being nine tenths of the law! Prussia similarly gained the duchies of Salm in the same manner.

    Hesse Kassel was given the lands of Hesse Darmstadt, and the two states became one, Darmstadt being erased for their actual support of France against their fellow men. Hesse also occupied Nassau to ensure the Rhine border remained intact.

    Saxony was also paid a smaller amount to cover the cost of it’s mobilisation in support of Prussia.

    Louis XVIII and his Queen, it was agreed, were to be sent to exile in England. Queen Louise did not want this exile for the French monarch and determined to find a way around the agreement so that the exiled King and his court remained in her control.



    • after Dickens
    • after Wikipedia
     
  2. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Swedish Pomerania, late September, 1803

    The “Wise Old Owl” the Queen had called him. Her father, Charles of Mecklenburg was indeed, just that. He had gathered his forces from the regions of Hanover and Prussia unaffected by the war in the East. These forces though, were the very same veterans of the war against France earlier in the year.

    Each man bore a medal on his chest proclaiming his participation in the Great War to free Hanover, and to strengthen the might of the North German Confederation in the West.

    Each man was proud to march in the regiments bearing the honour “Nienburg”. Those regiments not bearing that honour knew though that they had faced the might of the French and won! (Just)

    And now these same regiments were marching to face an ancient foe, the Swedish troops in Pomerania.

    The men marched from East Friesland:
    Division : GM Jung-Larisch
    Prussian Brigade
    4 Infantry Regiment ‘von Kalckreuth’ Nr. 4
    53 Infantry Regiment ‘von [Jung-]Larisch’ Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Hanoverian Brigade
    1 RegimenterZuFus
    8 RegimenterZuFus
    Combined Shutzen
    Combined Battalion Foot Artilery
    Prussian/Hanoverian Brigade
    55 Infantry Regiment ‘von Manstein’ Nr. 55
    6 RegimenterZuFus
    13 RegimenterZuFus
    Combined Shutzen
    Combined Battalion Foot Artilery
    Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Hanoverian Brigade
    3 RegimenterZuFus
    10 RegimenterZuFus
    Combined Shutzen
    Combined Battalion Foot Artilery
    Cavalry Division
    Cavalry Brigade
    2 Regiment of Horse Hanoverian
    4 Regiment of Horse Hanoverian
    2 Horse Artilery Company Hanoverian
    Cavalry Brigade
    1 Kurassier Regiment
    4 Kurassier Regiment

    The Guards came from Berlin:
    Division : GM Kuhnheim
    Prussian Brigade
    6 Infantry Regiment ‘Grenadier-Garde’ Nr. 6
    15 Infantry Regiment ‘Garde’ Nr. 15
    Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Prussian Brigade
    18 Infantry Regiment ‘Konig’ Nr. 18
    Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Division
    Hanoverian Guard Brigade
    FusGarde
    FusGarde, Grenadier Companies
    FusGarde, Combined Shutzen
    FusGarde Battalion Artilery
    Hessen Guard Brigade
    Leib Grenadier Garde
    Garde Grenadier
    FusGarde, Grenadier Companies
    FusGarde, Combined Shutzen
    FusGarde Battalion Artilery
    Foot Artilery Company
    Saxon Guard Brigade
    Leib Grenadier Garde
    FusGarde, Grenadier Companies
    FusGarde, Combined Shutzen
    FusGarde Battalion Artilery
    Guard Cavalry Division
    Guard Cavalry Brigade
    Garde Du Korps
    Hanoverian
    Garde Du Korps
    Hessen
    Leibgarde Zu Pherde Regiment
    Mecklenburg
    Guard Cavalry Division
    Guard Cavalry Brigade
    Gensd'armes
    Hessen
    Karabiniers
    Hessen
    Horse Artilery Company
    Hessen
    Guard Cavalry Division
    Guard Cavalry Brigade
    Garde du Corps
    Saxon
    Guard Karabiniers
    Saxon
    Horse Artilery Company
    Saxon
    Guard Cavalry Brigade
    1 Regiment of Horse Hanoverian
    3 Regiment of Horse Hanoverian
    Horse Artilery Company Hanoverian
    Guard Cavalry Brigade : OB Karl-Friedrich-Hermann von Beeren
    Kuirassier Garde du Korps : (600)
    10 Kuirassier Regiment (Gendarmes) : (600)
    2 Kuirassier Regiment (von Beeren) : (600)
    Horse Artillery (Scholten) : Battery (6-6pdr)


    And Prince Louis Ferdinand’s Advanced Guard came from Hanover:
    Avant Garde Division : Prinz Louis Ferdinand of Prussia
    49 Infantry Regiment ‘von Muffling’ Nr. 49 Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Hanoverian Brigade
    14 Licht RegimenterZuFus
    15 Licht RegimenterZuFus
    Combined Shutzen
    Combined Battalion Foot Artilery
    14/15 Combined Carabinier Battalion
    Cavalry Division
    Cavalry Brigade
    9 Light Dragoons Hanoverian
    10 Light Dragoons Hanoverian
    Cavalry Brigade
    2/7 Hussar Regiment (Kohler)
    2/2 Hussar Regiment

    All marched to support Generalmajor Tauentzien, who’s Prussians, Mecklenburger’s and Saxons were already covering Stralsund at a safe distance.
    Tauentzien, Generalmajor Bogislav-Friedrich von
    Division
    Prussian Brigade GM : Johann-Christian von Zweiffel
    45 Infantry Regiment ‘von Zweiffel’ Nr. 45
    13 Fusilier Battalion Rabenau Nr. 13
    15 Fusilier Battalion Ruhle Nr. 15
    Grenadier Battalion
    Foot Artilery Co
    Mecklenburg Brigade
    Leib Grenadier Regiment
    Infantry Regiment Erbprinz
    Strelitz Leibgarde Company
    Combined Shutzen
    Battalion Artilery
    Light Brigade, Bila, Generalmajor Karl-Anton-Ernst von
    7 Fusilier Battalion Rosen Nr. 7
    14 Fusilier Battalion Pelet Nr. 14
    Jager Company Valentini
    Jager Company Werner
    Light Brigade Erichsen, Oberst von
    10 Fusilier Battalion Erichsen Nr. 10
    1 Hussar Regiment Gettkandt Nr. 1: 5 squadrons
    14 Prussian 6-pdr Horse Battery Studnitz Nr. 14
    Saxon Brigade
    Combined Grenadier Battalions
    1 1/7 Hundt Saxon
    2 2/8 Metzsch Saxon
    3 3/9 Thiollaz Saxon
    4 4/10 Le Coq Saxon
    5 5/11 Lichtenhayn Saxon
    6 6/12 Saxon Foot Artilery Company
    Saxon Howitzer Battery Thullmann


    Tauentzien established his headquarters at Negast, southwest of Stralsund. His left flank was resting on the large body of water known as the Borgwallsee. His right flank was covered by woods, but he had a chain of vedettes through to Wendorf and beyond. Oberst von Erichsen screened Tauentzien’s front with his light brigade.

    All Tauentzien had to do was to sit and wait. Mecklenburg’s forces were moving into positions behind the Borgwallsee, and to the north. It was about this time that the Swedish General Johan Henric von Essen decided upon a pre-emptive move against Tauentzien, before the Prussians could marshal their forces. Von Essen marched thirteen thousand of his fifteen thousand strong force against Tauentzien’s division. Mecklenburg could not believe his luck!

    He ordered Tauentzien to feign a fighting withdrawal from Negast to Steinhagen. Von Essen took the bait. Assuming he was only facing Tauentzien’s Division, the Swedish forces relentlessly pursued the Prussians, and actually caused considerable panic among Zwieffels Brigade. Casualties were high amongst the Prussians, and complete disaster was only averted by the bravery of the Saxon Grenadier battalions Hundt and Metzsch, who covered the withdrawal (rout!) of the Prussian regiments. Proof, if proof were needed, of the difficulty in withdrawing in front of a determined enemy.

    Eventually, Tauentzien’s troops made it to Steinhagen, and that was the signal for Mecklenburg’s troops to move.

    Marching through the woodlands behind the Borgwallsee, the various divisions started to feed troops on to the Swedish right flank, and cut von Essen off from Sralsund. Determined as ever, von Essen made the effort to fight his way back through Mecklenburg’s forces to Stralsund. His final effort failing valiantly, against the solid red coated wall formed by the Hanoverian 5th and 12th Regiments blocking the road back to Stralsund.

    The fight was over. Mecklenburg decided to call the battle after the town where the most of the fighting took place, Negast. It was an acknowledgement also, that the Swedish troops performed very capably in the action there. Price Louis Ferdinand was entrusted with the management and care of the Swedish troops. Later von Essen was to thank him for his compassion and care of the Swedish wounded, and the honour accorded to the Swedish forces after the battle. Louis Ferdinand disarmed the Swedish Corps, however, he allowed them to march with honour back to Stralsund. Bands playing, colours proudly flying. It was a gesture the Swedish would not forget!

    Stralsund was now a Prussian port. Mecklenburg declared that the Swedish lands in Pomerania would be annexed by Prussia, and von Essen signed over the lands in the resulting peace settlement between the North German Confederation and Sweden.

    A veteran army, victorious in all its three campaigns this year, now sat twiddling its combined thumbs in and around Stralsund. “Where next?” the combined thumbs thought!

    Meanwhile, back in Kassel, it was decided that the Elector Wilhelm I and his wife, the beautiful Princess Wilhelmina Caroline of Denmark and Norway, would pay a visit toher parents in Copenhagen.
    Wilhelmina Caroline of Denmark and Norway, a good friend of Queen Louise, and a Valkyrie of great repute, was to escort Queen Marie Josephine of France back to her estates in Holstein. It was only polite that she did so! However, on reaching Copenhagen, Wilhelm and Wilhelmina Caroline received some outstanding news. Her father, the King of Denmark requested a formal audience!
     
  3. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Berlin October 1803

    And so we find our beautiful Queen in a sumptuous gown, standing over the reclining body of our erstwhile King, considering the recent gains Prussia has made in the wars of the eventful year of 1803. Frederick Wilhelm is on his own, Louise has her “ladies” with her. Louise is feeding FW with grapes. FW is feeling rather good, but not for long!

    The Queen said
    “Unt zo mine Koenig, is it not as I suggested? I tolt you your glorious armies vud beet der frenchies, did I not? Unt did I not tell you zat zer vunderbar frauline in mine Valkerie Legion vud play zer part, did I not?
    Didn’t I alzo tell you zat der Czar unt der Tsar voz der zame bad man zat vud overthrow your kliene kingdom if he zaw provit in der venture?
    Unt didn’t mine liddle azzociation give you zer low down on der rebellion lead by der barsterd Darmstadt?
    Unt from zat liddle fracas, did you not gain zer lands of Salm and tighten your grip on zer lands of der Confederation?
    Did not mine Frauline’s give you zer edge on der Ruskies? Have you not gained millions of subjects from the Treaty of Tilsit? Is Lithuania not yours?
    And now, has not Daddy given you Pomerania?
    All zis, unt vot have you given me?
    Neu veels on mine carriage, zat is vot you have given to me! Neu fugin veels!
    Its time to bring out zer krop you dumnkof! If I had vonted neu veels I vud have got ze farrier to bling up me a set for mine carriage. Have you no zence vot zo ever?
    Zo, you vill do zer vollowing vidout komplaint, or I vill use der krop again!
    1, Zer Electors of Hesse unt Saxony are to be made Koenig in zer lands, unt leaders of zere confederated states.
    2, Zer Duke of Cumberland iz to be offered zer trone of Hanover, unt Aremberg is to be given to Hanover in thanks vor dere help in zer recent krieg.
    3, Hanover is to be “persuaded” zat der lands of der Holstein should be Hanoverian.
    4, Daddy schud be made a prinz of der Confederation.
    5, Ze Hapsbugs are to be politely requested to assist in the restoration of the lands of your cousin the King of Sardinia.
    6, Ve need a navy! Denmark haz von zat vud do, take it!
    7, Mine beautiful boy Villie should be made Prinz ov Lithuania.
    8, zat schidt Poniatovski, should be raised from duties in Warsaw to become Govenor of ze New territories in south Prussia and Neu Ost Prussia.”
    FW was no longer feeling well. He did not dare to tell his beautiful Queen that he was fed up and did not want to play today. He thought it most unfair that he could not decide what he wanted to do himself. But that Krop – sorry – crop did hurt so, and he did love his Queen and wanted to make her happy.
    So FW called once again for Mollendorf, and maps of certain Northern lands and Southern Empires.
    Where will it all end?
     
  4. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Location:
    Santa Marta,Magdalena,Colombia
    Start with the TL(still not notice the POD, in fact to know more about preussen history) but diffculy can read this paragraph(the german still this a language who I didn't start to learn), please post this again in full english

    well, the tl seems good(to learn a lot about the Prussia History and all)
     
  5. WestVirginiaRebel Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Location:
    Parkersburg, West Virginia USA
    Interesting response fron the States-an earlier civil war in the making if America gets involved? WI Hamilton proves to be right in the long run; what happens to Jefferson and his anti-British policies?
     
  6. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire

    Just goes to show you should not try writing when full of falling down water! I will write in "full english" and translate my drunken germanese for all!
     
  7. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Not too sure of american politics of this period so will be doing more research to see what I can get out of it, but you are coming from where I am going to!
     
  8. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    And so we find (Once again!) our beautiful Queen in a sumptuous gown, standing over the reclining body of our erstwhile King. Considering the recent gains Prussia has made in the wars of the eventful year of 1803. Frederick Wilhelm is on his own, Louise has her “ladies” with her. Louise is feeding FW with grapes. FW is feeling rather good, but not for long!

    The Queen said
    “Unt zo mine Koenig, is it not as I suggested? I tolt you your glorious armies vud beet der frenchies, did I not? Unt did I not tell you zat zer vunderbar frauline in mine Valkerie Legion vud play zer part, did I not?”

    To which she referred to the fortunate circumstances that befell the Prussian and allied armies in Hanover, early on in the year, at the hands of the Bonaparte and his French divisions. Frederick William III, was very lucky that the death of Bonaparte caused such turmoil back in Paris, that the French sued for peace (however temporary) with the North Germans. It allowed our happy monarch to dominate the lands on the “right bank” of the Rhine, taking Salm for himself and Aremburg for the Hanoverians. Hesse Kassel gained handsomely, in that the lands of Hesse Darmstadt came under his direct influence, of which more later, and the lands of Nassau were “constrained” to follow his orders – or else!

    “Didn’t I alzo tell you zat der Czar unt der Tsar voz der zame bad man zat vud overthrow your kliene kingdom if he zaw provit in der venture?”

    This, of course, refers to the more recent war with the Russians, and their plan to “free Hanover”. Not only were Alexander’s men hopelessly out of touch with the news, they were hopelessly out of touch with each other! General Lestoq managed to get amongst the disparate Russian divisions and defeat each one in detail, on the field of his choosing. The campaign ended terribly for the Czar, in that he had to agree to humiliating terms to recover his freedom and that of his divisions in East Prussia. Queen Louise was aware that the Czar had plans for her in his intended victory, a fact she let slip to her hubby the King of Prussia.
    It all ended well for the King, as not only did Russia agree to pay a massive indemnity, and sign a non aggression treaty to run for at least two years, and agree not to sign an alliance with an enemy of Prussia, but also to relinquish the territories in Poland and Lithuania gained in 1795 at the table in the third partition of Poland! Even now, Frederick William is daydreaming of the nice new regiments of Uhlans (sorry - Lancers) and a new regiment of Guards, amongst the other troops he will raise in the new territories of “White Prussia” and “New East Prussia”
    How long this situation will last, or indeed how long Czar Alexander will last, is another matter! We all recall his unfortunate father’s accident on the stairs of the palace, when he fell seventeen times on to the bayonet of a Guardsman! The Nobles of Russia will not be happy.

    “Unt didn’t mine liddle azzociation give you zer low down on der rebellion lead by der barsterd Darmstadt? “

    Now, what happened to the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt? Having had his lands taken from him by force, he was whisked away to a location known only to Queen Louise. Here, Louis X, for that was his name, was starved, drugged and threatened with events most dire, if he did not accede to the Queens plans for him. As we look around the room in which our Monarchs are having their current “chat” you will notice that when this subject is raised, the Queens ladies all start to laugh! All bar one, that is. The King is most disturbed at this strange outburst, but the Queen quiets him and they carry on as before. The one “lady” on close inspection, however, is seen to bear a familial resemblance to Louis X, though always out of breath (“her” corsets are so tight) and is seen to totter along in her perilously high heels (as unbeknown to the casual observer, her ankles, hidden by voluminous skirts, are tethered together by a very short length of delicate chain!) Louise, as she is known, is very quiet!

    “Unt from zat liddle fracas, did you not gain zer lands of Salm and tighten your grip on zer lands of der Confederation?”

    The victories and the resultant riches gained by them enabled the Queen to suggest that the North German States would be better off if they were formally allied and ultimately reliant upon one another for their existence. She told her Ladies the same, they told their husbands (the heads of state in North Germany), and they proposed to the King, that he form “The North German Confederation”. The King, of course, was told by the Queen to say yes!

    “Did not mine Frauline’s give you zer edge on der Ruskies? Have you not gained millions of subjects from the Treaty of Tilsit? Is Lithuania not yours?”

    As we have seen, the lands of Poland and Lithuania, gained by Russia in the third Partition, were now Prussian. How long for , Dear Reader, we may only guess at. But for now they are Prussian. A certain Prince Poniatovski, has been given the job of running the government in the new territory of White Russia, and New East Prussia is rumoured to be bequeathed to young Prince William

    “And now, has not Daddy given you Pomerania?”

    Swedish Pomerania, to be precise! And Daddy is Charles of Mecklenburg, victor in the recent battle to take Stralsund. The Kings brother, Prince Louis Ferdinand has gathered the defeated Swedish army, and given succour to their wounded, given the men back their pride, and even found sufficient vessels to carry them home to Sweden. Gustav IV Adolf, was most thankful, and the Swedish people were pleased that the deaths after the battle were minimised. The fact that the Swedish naval vessels at Stralsund were not returned did not go amiss with the French trade delegation at the port

    “All zis, unt vot have you given me?
    Neu veels on mine carriage, zat is vot you have given to me! Neu fugin veels!”

    Never one to understand the subtle workings of a woman’s mind, (or the devious workings of his Queens mind) Our simple hero had sought to please his queen with a new set of Golden wheels on their state carriage, just like cousin Georgie had in London. Poor Frederick William!

    “Its time to bring out zer krop you dumnkof! If I had vonted neu veels I vud have got ze farrier to bling up me a set for mine carriage. Have you no zence vot zo ever?”

    Obviously the King thought otherwise, and even had the good sense to keep his mouth firmly shut at this juncture!

    “Zo, you vill do zer vollowing vidout komplaint, or I vill use der krop again!”

    Or to put it another way “If you don’t do as I say, I will open a whole can of whooparse on your head” The king understood it the first time round in his native Germanese!

    “1, Zer Electors of Hesse unt Saxony are to be made Koenig in zer lands, unt leaders of zere confederated states.”

    Hesse and Saxony to be Kings! What will the Emperor of Austria say to that little gem? Not to mention the guarantors of the German lands, Russia and France! What will the King of Denmark say when he hears his cousin and daughter are to be instrumental in forming the biggest threat to his Kingdom Denmark has ever witnessed?

    “2, Zer Duke of Cumberland iz to be offered zer trone of Hanover, unt Aremberg is to be given to Hanover in thanks vor dere help in zer recent krieg.”

    Cumberland might accept, but what would his big brother say? Or parliament?

    “3, Hanover is to be “persuaded” zat der lands of der Holstein should be Hanoverian.”

    If we make you a Kingdom, you will need a greater land to rule! Obvious init? Only is it? Will Cumberland see it that way?

    “4, Daddy schud be made a prinz of der Confederation.”

    That Mecklenburg should be made a principality is no skin of anyone’s nose, and it would only be sour grapes if they were to complain, after all the good work that Daddy did. (Sorry, all the good work that Charles of Mecklenburg has done).

    “5, Ze Hapsbugs are to be politely requested to assist in the restoration of the lands of your cousin the King of Sardinia.”

    An alliance with Sardinia, of course it makes sense! Why did not the King see that earlier? An alliance with the “Prussia of the South” will only strengthen Prussias hand against both Austria and France. Oh how his Queen was not only beautiful, but zo klever (sorry – so clever)

    “6, Ve need a navy! Denmark haz von zat vud do, take it!”

    I would bet our King would need to do more that politely ask Christian VII for his navy! All thisjust as the Elector of Hesse is on a state visit to the very Monarch in question! Our gallant Elector and his wife (the daughter of King Christian) are in for a lovely surprise on reaching Copenhagen.

    “7, Mine beautiful boy Villie should be made Prinz ov Lithuania.”

    Frederick William thought as much, all she ever thinks about is her Villie (Prince William). (No, it is Louis X that is the transvestite!) Still if he says yes to this one, it will get her of his back for a while! (some hope)

    “8, zat schidt Poniatovski, should be raised from duties in Warsaw to become Govenor of ze New territories in south Prussia and Neu Ost Prussia.”

    The King could not make sense of this one, as everyone knew that Poniatovski was a prominent Pole, and a strident voice in the cause of Polish nationalism. The Queen put him right. She said that he should keep his friends close, and his enemy’s closer still! She then turned to her ladies and said”Isn’t that right Louise”? The ladies (except the unfortunate “Louise” giggled)

    FW was no longer feeling well. He did not dare to tell his beautiful Queen that he was fed up and did not want to play today. He thought it most unfair that he could not decide what he wanted to do himself. But that Krop – sorry – crop did hurt so, and he did love his Queen and wanted to make her happy.
    So FW called once again for Mollendorf, and maps of certain Northern lands and Southern Empires.
    Where WILL it all end?
     
  9. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    The POD is a diferent outcome to the failing treaty of Amiens, The characters are all historically real people, but their actions are twisted by my meglomaniac tendancies. Why only yesterday, I demanded the whole of the couch to sprawl out on and watch TV! Like Frederick William, my "Queen" put me right! (She's a wonderful lady, just don't cross her)!
     
  10. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    A visit to the In-laws!

    Wonderful Copenhagen!


    Wilhelm I., Kurfürst von Hessen, was born on the 3 June 1743, and was the eldest surviving son of Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Mary of Great Britain, the daughter of George II.
    William of Hanau (As he was titled before his fathers death as he had received the Principality of Hanau south of the Hessian territories, near Frankfurt, as successor of its newly extinct princes, already in the lifetime of his father, since the Hanau people did not want to have a Catholic ruler.) was married, on 1 September 1764 at Christiansborg Palace, in Copenhagen, Denmark, to his first cousin Wilhelmina Caroline of Denmark and Norway (1747–1820), the second surviving daughter of king Frederick V of Denmark and Norway. They were well matched and madly in love, but remained mostly in Denmark, until 1785 to return to Kassel when William succeeded in the landgraviate. William however William's younger brother Charles followed suit and in 1766 married another of their Danish first cousins.
    Upon the death of his father on October 31, 1785 he became William IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and as such, is said to have inherited one of the largest fortunes in Europe at the time. In 1803, he was raised to Elector, on the re-organisation of the German lands. His son William was born in 1777.
    Wilhelmina Caroline was instrumental in enabling the transfer of the Queen of France to Kassel from Holstein, to meet with Louis XVIII, all at the behest of Queen Louise of Prussia. Also, after the Franco German peace talks, Wilhelmina, and the ladies of the Valkyrie, were able to have Louis XVIII travel to Berlin to meet with the Prussian Queen.
    The weather in Copenhagen was as could be expected for November. However, it was not the weather that froze relationships between our new Elector and his father in law King Christian of Denmark.
    The Danish King had received a communiqué from the Prussian court, requesting that Christian perform a task on behalf of the Prussian King. It involved our Hessian love birds, and was the reason for the Kings frosty welcome!
    As they disembarked from their vessel in the docks, they were met by a deputation from the Danish court. Nothing unusual in this, for a visiting dignitary, but they were also greeted by a regiment of dragoons, and the Danish Royal Guard. As they processed from the dock to the Christiansborg Palace, they also heard the thunder of a twenty one gun salute sound from the Trekroner battery in the harbour mouth.
    All this was normally reserved for a visiting monarch, not a mere Elector of the Empire!
    Eventually, and without rest from their travels, they were led into the throne room of the Palace, where gathered the King of Denmark and the men of his Government.
    “Hail King”! Christian shouted to William. Confused, William looked about for a King other than Christian in the room. There was none. “Your Majesty, you confuse me”, William stated.
    “Not as confused as I dear brother”, angrily retorted Christian. “Your friend the King of Prussia, has demanded of me that I greet you as an equal, for that is now what you are, King of Westphlia”. “All hail King William of Westphalia!” The Court responded in a muted fashion, out of duty, if not respect.
    Christian went on “My ambassador in Berlin advises me that you and your Confederation are intent upon gaining what belongs to us, that your armies wait at our borders, and your ambitions wait on the sails of our navy!”
    “Know this William of Westphalia, your Confederation will not succeed in it’s aims, and even now our forces are preparing to defend what is rightfully ours. Turn around NOW, and go back to your Frederick William. Inform him Denmark is not his for the taking, and tell his Queen her Valkyrie’s wings will be clipped, if any are found in this land!” At this Christian glowered at his daughter, “do not attempt to change my mind your Highness”, as Wilhelmina was now, she realised on hearing this, a Queen!
    The Westphalian Royal party, was promptly escorted from the room, and back to their carriage, to be returned to the vessel they arrived in. So much for a visit to the in-laws!
     
  11. perfectgeneral Velocireader. Highly socially inept. CMII Donor

    Joined:
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    Grantebrycge, 888 a.d.
    I find holding the control button down while moving the mouse wheel helps me cope with the various text sizes. Most writers need an editor, but I think you would benefit from a page layout artist. :p

    A good summary of a complex political situation (Central Europe for you) followed by a farcical piece of diplomacy. I pity Louise. She stands no chance in this life. A bit like Denmark really.

    End FW? We have only just begun!
     
  12. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    My tripe righter lets me down all the time (a worker blaming his tools and all that!) Thanks for the comments!
     
  13. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

    But first to Sweden


    With the return of the prisoners of war from Stralsund to Sweden, public opinion started to turn against the King Gustav and his administration. It was felt that Gustav Adolph and “his” government, had given in too easily, against the North German Confederation.
    They also thought that the war could have been avoided if a little thought had been devoted to the subject. No fault was found in the affairs of the army, as they had committed themselves heroically in the face of overwhelming odds.
    Gustav was considered inept, and had caused his nation loss in men, money and prestige. The situation was worse in the upper echelons of the army, where officers were disgusted at what they had been asked to do through Gustav’s failed strategies.
    The Prussian ambassador and his staff, made great play of the “heroic Swedish soldier” and declared that in all of Europe, the talk was of their heroic resistance to the forces of North Germany. Balls and Galas were held in honour of the officers of that famous corps “the gallant men of Stralsund” all financed by the coffers of Queen Louise of Prussia. She ensured that Prussian senior officers were seen at these events, even Prince Louis Ferdinand returning to Swedish shores to attend one such ball. His visit was greeted by the applause of the Swedish officer corps, who recognised what he had done to aid the safe return of their troops to home shores.
    And of course, the senior officers took their wives, and the web of the queen spread wider. Swedish General Johan Henric von Essen, and his family were decorated with Prussian honours, not the least his wife, Hedvig Eleonora Charlotte von Krassow, who was created a Grand Dame of the Order of Louise, and became a firm friend of the Prussian circle in Stockholm, and the web of the queen spread wider still!

    And now on to Denmark


    The Danish Kings threat to Frederick William, delivered as it was through the new King of Westphalia, could not fail to raise the ire of the Prussian court. It was related in full to a meeting of the Confederation in early December, and the outcome was only to be as expected. War was desired, and war was declared. The Oberkriegskollegium tried to dissuade the politicians from a winter war, but the strength of feeling was such, that only the outright defeat of the Danish would satisfy the slur on the honour of the Prussian King, and avenge the terrible reception given to a Sovereign of the Confederation, as was given to William I of Westphalia.
    The Christmas present from Prussia to Denmark was the tramp of Mecklenburg’s army from Pommerania, up into Holstein. The Danes fought well in several small actions, their militia were declared to be as good as regulars, and served several small defeats on the advancing confederate forces.
    Rendsberg was a notable defeat for the Danes, Mecklenburg’s Guards reserve and the left wing of his army, sweeping the Danes from the field. January saw the second and more notable defeat of the Danish army at Eckernforde, where the final mainland resistance of the Danes was broken. Many died on the field from frostbite, and the Confederation forces did not advance further for many days.
    Tauentzien’s Advanced Guard column eventually pushed on through Schleswig, clearing any further garrisons of the Danish army.
    They eventually came upon a town called Snoghoj on the Snaevringen estuary. The site that greeted him was the best thing he could have hoped for. Snaevringen was covered in ice! Within days Odensee had fallen, and all of Funen was if allied hands.
    Not too far away, the British had been observing events from the comfort (!) of their squadron on station in the area. The Prussians invited them to “join in the fun” and assist their descent upon Copenhagen via the good services of the Royal Navy. The Commander, Hyde Parker, signalled that he would not be able to entertain the Prussian request, but would, however, shadow events closely, if he would be allowed to. Indeed two officers on one of his foremost vessels were heard to say:
    Horatio:
    He waxes desperate with imagination
    Marcellus:
    Let’s follow. ‘Tis not fit thus to obey him.
    Horatio:
    Have after. To what issue will this come?
    Marcellus:
    Something is rotten in the state of Denmark
    Horatio:
    Heaven will direct it.
    Marcellus:
    Nay, let’s follow him.
    By the end of February, Loland and Falster had fallen to the allied cause, the first by mercheant vessels conveying elements of the allied force onto the Island, the second by the same method Funen had been taken, that of a quick and perilous trip across the ice. Many were lost on this last “Island hop” as the ice near to the open waters of the Baltic was not as secure as that further up the channel. Tauentzien lost a battalion of Saxon Grenadiers to the freezing deapth’s of the sea, as the surface gave way under the right flank of his forces rapid march across the ice.
    Realising the inevitable, and unable to utilise their navy, the Danes asked for, and received an armistice. This truce resulted in the capitulation of the Danish forces to the Confederation.
    The Royal Navy looked on helpless. It was never the intention to allow the North Germans to gain a Naval force, even if they were allies of Great Britain. The Ice still held fast in the roads about Copenhagen, and the Danish Navy fell into the hands of the victors, intact.
    By March, the provisional government of German and Danish leaders passed the law determining that the Danish Kingdom would form an integral part of the Confederation. King Christian abdicated in the following days. Mecklenburg was announced as the caretaker Governor of Denmark, until the new King could be sworn in. Frederick, the Prince Regent, also was barred from the throne, as he was duplicitous in having his father undertake the original outburst against William of Westphalia.
    So who will be King of Denmark now?

    But now back to Sweden


    Gustav Adolf's inept and erratic leadership in diplomacy and war precipitated his deposition through a conspiracy of army officers. It would seem that both Denmark and Sweden suffered from the same kind of King!
    On 7 March 1804, Lieutenant-Colonel Georg Adlersparre, commander of a part of the western army, declared against the King and directed the troops with him to march upon Stockholm. To prevent the King from joining loyal troops in Scania, on 13 March 1804 seven of the conspirators led by Carl Johan Adlercreutz broke into the royal apartments in the palace, seized the King, and imprisoned him and his family in Gripsholm castle. The king's uncle, Duke Charles, was thereupon persuaded to accept the leadership of a provisional government, which was proclaimed the same day; and a diet, hastily summoned, solemnly approved of the revolution.
    On 29 March Gustav IV Adolf, to save the crown for his son, voluntarily abdicated; but on 19 May the Riksdag of the Estates, dominated by the army, declared that not merely Gustav but his whole family had forfeited the throne, perhaps an excuse to exclude his family from succession based on the rumours of his illegitimacy. A more likely cause, however, is that the revolutionaries feared that Gustav's son, if he inherited the throne, would revenge his father's deposal when he came of age. On 5 June a new liberal constitution was enacted, which was ratified by the diet the next day. In December Gustav and his family were transported to Germany.
    The search was on for a new King, but who?

    You can bet, Dear Reader, that regarding the empty thrones of Denmark and Sweden, Louise of Prussia will have her ideas!
     
  14. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Excerpt from “William deFame’s History of European Monarchs”

    Charles 1st of Denmark, Norway and Prince of Hesse (Kassel, 19 December 1744 – Luisenlund, 17 August 1836) was born as the second surviving son of Kassel's then hereditary prince, the future Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and his first wife Princess Mary of Great Britain. His mother was the daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach.

    His father, the future landgrave (who reigned from 1760 and died in 1785), had left the family in 1747 and soon converted to Catholicism, and in 1755 formally ended his marriage to Princess Mary. The grandfather, William VIII, Landgrave of Hesse, granted the county of Hanau and its revenues to Mary and her sons. The young Prince Charles and his two brothers were raised by their mother, and fostered by Protestant relatives since 1747. In 1756, they moved to Denmark, to care for Mary's late sister's Louise's underage children. In 1763, his elder brother married their first cousin, Danish Princess Caroline. Charles followed suit on 30 August 1766 at Christiansborg Palace — his wife was Louise of Denmark.

    Charles began a military career in Denmark. When the crown prince and regent of Denmark, potentially the future Frederick VI married Charles's eldest daughter Marie Sophie, Charles made several unsuccessful attempts at substantially influencing decisions of the government and the regent.

    He was absent during the North German invasion of Schleswig and Holstein due to a serious bout of Influenza, but was able to join the Danish forces for the later actions on the Danish Islands.

    Charles was a remarkable patron of theater and opera. He had his own court theater in Schleswig, and he involved himself extensively in its operations, moving it on his accession to the Danish throne, to Christiansborg Palace.

    For most of his life, Charles had lived in Gottorp Castle with his family. After his election to the throne of Denmark, he and his family, lived in the Royal Palace of Christiansborg, in Cobenhavn.

    Charles was prefered for the throne over the Prussian courts choice of Prince William of Prussia, The governments reasoning was that William was too close to the Prussian crown, not only could he concevably be monarch of Denmark, but also that of Prussia, leaving Denmark without an independent voice in the courts of Europe. It was also considered that William would be seen as “the conquering dynasty”, and thus not find favour with public opinion.

    In 1768, Charles purchased the landed property and village of Offenbach-Rumpenheim from the Edelsheim family. In 1771 he had the manor expanded into a castle and princely seat.

    On 25 January 1804, Charles was granted the title "Landgrave of Hesse" by his elder brother, who had assumed the higher dignity and titulary of King of Westphalia.

    He named the Luisenlund castle in Schleswig province in honor of his wife.

    His family remained in Denmark, founding its ruling dynasty for many generations. Only his eldest brother returned to Hesse, in 1785, when ascending the landgraviate.


    On 30 August 1766, Charles married Princess Louise of Denmark and Norway, his first cousin, the youngest daughter of his aunt, Princess Louise of Great Britain, and King Frederick V of Denmark and Norway, who died the same year. The couple had the following children:
    1. Marie Sophie, Princess of Denmark, Norway and Hesse (20 October 1767 – 21 March 1852), married on 31 July 1790 her first cousin the future Prince Regent Frederick of Denmark and Norway
    2. Wilhelm, Prince of Hesse (15 January 1769 – 14 July 1772)
    3. Prince Frederik of Denmark, Norway and Hesse (24 May 1771 – 24 February 1845), a General in the Danish Army; Frederik became King Frederik of Denmark and Norway in 1836, on the death of his father.
    4. Juliane, Princess of Denmark, Norway and Hesse (19 January 1773 – 11 March 1860), Protestant Abbess of Itzehoe
    5. Prince Christian of Denmark, Norway and Hesse (14 August 1776 – 14 November 1814)
    6. Louise Caroline, Princess of Denmark, Norway and Hesse (28 September 1789 – 13 March 1867), married on 28 January 1810 Wilhelm, Duke of Glücksburg
    Queen Louise of Denmark and Norway, was made Grande Dame of the order of Louise in 1804, In honour of the Queen of Prussias recognition of her patriotic fervour, and duty to the Danish people during the war with the North German Confederation. The new sixth Prussian Line infantry Regiment was also named in her honour. (the sixth [Queen Louise of Denmark and Norway] Musketeer Regiment [Grenadiers])

    King Charles was made a Field Marshall of the North German Confederation, and became a member of the secretive Order of Tuton, normaly the exclusive realm of high ranking North German Officers that had commanded in at least three battles.

    In March 1804, Charles was instrumental in signing a treaty with the North German Confederation, that admitted Denmark and Norway as full members of the Confederation, , to the later great benefit of Denmark and Norway, and subjected it’s armed forces to the central control of the new Office of the General Staff. One by-product of this treaty, was the training of North German Jager and specialist light troops in Norway.
    King Charles died in castle Luisenlund in Güby, Schleswig.
     
  15. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Excerpt from “William deFame’s History of European Monarchs”

    King (Friedrich Ludwig) Christian, commonly known as Louis Ferdinand (November 18, 1772 – October 10, 1860), was a prince of Prussia and a soldier in the Revolutionary Wars.



    Louis Ferdinand was born in Schloß Friedrichsfelde near Berlin. He was a son of Prince August Ferdinand of Prussia and Elisabeth Louise of Brandenburg-Schwedt, and was a nephew of King Frederick the Great. He married the Marie Adelaide de la Grange, a Catholic who later changed her religion to allow her husband the accession to the throne of Sweden. He had a son from the marriage, Theodor Friedrich. Ludwig von Wildenbruch was an illegitimate son of Louis Ferdinand.

    Louis Ferdinand participated in the French Revolutionary Wars and was wounded during the Siege of Mainz. In 1803, he was one of the principal advocates of resuming the war against Bonaparte and the French Republican armies, triggering the Hanoverian War. He arrived late in the day at the battle of Nienburg, to the welcome relief of the Hanoverian General Wallmoden, who was unaware Prussia had entered the war against France in support of Hanover.

    In the later campaign where the French retaliated, Louis Ferdinand was in command of the Prussian rear guard, when a round shot from one of his guns tore through the shoulder of Bonaparte, killing him and thus ending the battle that was fast turning into a rout for the North German allies.

    Later in the year, after the Pommeranian campaign, he treated the defeated Swedish garrison of Stralsund with honour, and ensured that the welfare of the prisoners, up to their return to Stockholm in Prussian mercheant vessels, was well maintained.
    Subsequent visits to Stockholm found Louis Ferdinand honoured in return, by the Swedish military establishment. Much diplomatic manouvering was organised by the Prussian Embassy at the behest of Queen Louise of Prussia. The result was the eventual election to the throne of Sweden by Louis Ferdinand, as King Christian, in the June of 1804. The deposed and discredited Royal family of Sweden, eventualy moving to Magdeburg in December of the same year at the invitation of the Prussian court.

    In August 1804, Christian was instrumental in signing a treaty with the North German Confederation, that admitted Sweden and Finland as full members of the Confederation, to the later great benefit of Sweden and Finland, and subjected it’s armed forces to the central control of the new Office of the General Staff. One by-product of this treaty, was the establishment of a garrison of North German troops in Helsinki for the defence of Finland from Russia, and the subsequent development of specialist light troops in the mountains of Finland.
     
  16. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    A North South divide

    Events in the Americas



    31st July, 1803, Lieutenant General Grinfield, the commanding officer of the expedition in Louisiana, dispatches a strong force under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Nicholson to engage the French garrison in St Lucia. Within four days of their dispatch, his troops carried by storm the fort of Morne Fortunee, which produced the unconditional surrender of the island. The expedition then proceeded to Tobago, that island was also reduced to British authority. The Dutch colonies of Demarara, Essequibo and Berbice, surrendered in October, when they too were reached by the intrepid Colonel.
    At St Dominigo, the French General Leclerc died on the 2nd November. He had been sent there with a great force of arms to put down the insurrection by the black population of the Island. He was succeeded by General Rochambeau. The French position grew untenable and the garrison was lifted of the Island by the British Royal Navy, the French having suffered incredibly with casualties from the insurrection, but more so from disease. By November 30th, all French Naval and Merchant vessels had been surrendered to the British, together with the whole garrison of the island.
    August 15th, 1803, Commodore Hood orders the seizure of all armed vessels operating in the waters around the western reaches of the British expedition in Louisiana. “If they fail to surrender, sink the ruddy things”, he is said to have stated! The action is undertaken by the fifth rate vessels of his force and supported by various brigs and ketches and the like. There are some furious chases, and even an occasional broadside, but the pirate vessels are scattered, captured or sunk. Companies of the West India Regiment, together with the Royal Marines and some militia, occupy the principle harbours from which the pirate vessels were known to operate.
    1st September, 1803, sees the first of several fresh troop deployments to the area from the British Isles. A further twelve thousand Infantry are to arrive in the coming month, together with four regiments of light horse, and the three Guards regiments of horse. A loyalist militia is raised as support units for those regiments on field duty around the area.
    British garrisons of varying strengths are now to be found as far west as Galveston bay (a battalion of the 1st regiment of Foot (The Royal Scots), and as far east as Port St Joe in West Florida (a company of the 93rd (Highland) regiment of Foot)
    The State of Georgia, has requested aid from the Federal Government. They are worried that the British may try an incursion into their State territory. General Grinfield sends assurances that his forces have no such orders.
    The dissension between the Northern and Southern States grows daily, with several of the Northern states actively seeking secession, in order to form their own Confederation. Massachusetts Senator Timothy Pickering, gaining much support for his drive to form a separate northern confederacy, offered Vice President Aaron Burr the presidency, Burr was wavering in his rejection of the idea. The longer time went on; the more support he received for his candidature, and the fewer objections he could find. The Federal Government wanted to raise troops to defend the states against the British, but to do so would have given the secessionists an armed force that they would have aimed to bring into their cause. That did not deter the raising of volunteer units, the length and breadth of the States. Private armies were training for a war they new was coming; but who was to be the enemy?
    British merchants in New Orleans, are developing trade there to rival any other port in the Americas. Free passage of goods is allowed to American vessels, after they have paid the due taxes, however, the vessels are searched on leaving port, to ensure that weapons and deserters from the British forces are not on board. Any vessel found to be carrying weapons of any kind, is impounded.
    In the north, Quebec and Montreal, were also to receive further troops, with the arrival of two battalions of regulars, and a squadron of light horse.
    The British representatives in Canada, were also requested to make fresh overtures to the Native tribes in the area, with the purpose of establishing Native Provinces, to buffer the effect of the expansion of the United States westward.
    1st October, 1803, The Governor General of India in Calcutta and now discoverers he is to prepare a newly dispatched force of all arms in Calcutta, destination; The Sandwich Islands, to establish a combined naval and military garrison there. This is in preparation of the intended future garrisoning of the West Coast of the Americas. These garrisons will be based on Vancouver Island, the garrisons are intended to support the British interests in the area, from the borders with Russian America in the North, to the increase of British interests in the South at the expense of Spain.
    He finds the image of Bengal Light Horse (Lancers) charging Spanish militia highly amusing, and writes to his brother Arthur, requesting that he completes his tasks in hand, and prepare to meet the new force in the Sandwich Islands, with the intention of him commanding the forces in North America.
     
  17. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    The War in the South 1803
    The Austrians entered in to their plan with great enthusiasm; if not speed! It took several days for the various parts of their Army of Bavaria to leave the fortress at Linz and commence their march down the line of the Danube and into Bavarian lands. They employed great barges on the river to carry their supplies, tying their line of communications to the Danube and it was obvious to all where the army was to move. This transparency was more than offset by the resultant lack of congestion on the roads. The Army passed through Passau on the 10th August, and several days later, made the crossing of the River Isar against the first resistance to be seen by the Bavarian army.

    The Bavarians, for the most part, had concentrated their forces at Freising, to cover Munich. They quickly realised the Austrians plan, and marched north to intercept them. A great battle was had at Straubing, south of the territory of Ratisbon. Here, the Bavarian army fared well, though was ultimately denied victory in a close fought action.

    The Bavarians retreated on their lines of communication, whilst the Austrian column marched further west to the vicinity of Bruck, there to turn south, with Augsburg as their destination. Having been unable to pursue the defeated but unbowed Bavarians, The Austrians determined to encircle the Bavarians, and prevent anyone (the French) supporting the Bavarian army before they finished it off.

    The Austrian Army of Italy moved with a little more enthusiasm, and fought several sharp actions in the Po valley, pushing French and Italian troops out of the Italian republic, and into the Duchy of Parma. At this point, all seemed to be going well for the Austrians. The King of Sardinia thought so too. He mobilised his army with the view to it being shipped to the Genoese coast as a prelude to him marching at the head of his troops (and those of Austria) to recover his lost lands from the French. The Kingdom of Sicily, likewise made similar preparations to move against French and Italian troops in Naples. Both Kingdoms receiving financial support from Great Britain, and the offer of an alliance with the North German Confederation, should they be successful in their aims.

    By September, the Austrians had victories a-plenty in both theatres. Bavaria had been forced to surrender its forces after a second major battle went badly for them. Elements of the army fled north to Nuremberg and Bamberg, with the Austrians hot in pursuit. Munich was occupied, and the Bavarian Elector found himself a guest at the headquarters of the Archduke John. General Mack’s pursuit of the remnants of the Bavarian army took him north of the Danube. He was so determined to catch the fleeing Bavarians, that in early October, he took his army through the Prussian territory of Ansbach, to arrive in Nuremburg ahead of his quarry.

    In the Italian theatre, Massena was having little success against the Austrians. The battle at Marengo went against him, though he managed to extricate his army to fight another day. Massena marched his troops to Genoa, and there prepared to put the fortress into a state of readiness for the second time in his career.

    Late October saw the Austrians holding all their objectives. Moreau’s Army of Germany had yet to pass through Baden, Massena was cooped up in Genoa, and the Bavarians were defeated. The onset of winters foul weather, prevented further major actions on the part of both the Austrians and the French, and both determined to await the onset of better weather in spring, before committing any further troops to the fray.

    Elsewhere in the theatre, as a prelude to taking back his territories, the King of Sardinia, King Victor Emanuel I, had taken a portion of his army and shipped them across the small stretch of the Mediterranean sea, and landed them at Porto-Vecchio, in Corsica. British war ships covered his landing, and cheered him on his way, as he marched to conquer the Island.

    British Royal Marines had taken Dubrovnik in the Republic of Ragusa, and the Sicilian King had broken his nose, after tripping over his sword in a parade of his Guards. He no longer thought it “macho” to wear his sword slung so low down his leg. He did, however, manage to mobilise the best part of his armed forces, after the British offer of a subsidy to be paid on the successful landing of his troops in mainland Naples.

    And so the snows of winter hissed as they fell onto the camp fire flames along the Po and the Danube. The Austrian Emperor was elated at his successes, that was at least until the Prussian Minister Count Haugwitz requested an audience with the Emperor. Haugwitz was not a happy bunny!
     
  18. LordCalner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2011
    Location:
    Sweden
    Stumbled across this and its magnificent! would you please resume your work?:)
     
  19. Colonel Troutstrangler Soldier of the Queen. CMII.

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Location:
    Lancashire
    resumption pending

    Thank you for the compliment! A resumption is on the cards, watch this space.
     
  20. LordCalner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2011
    Location:
    Sweden
    Glad to hear it! since this one caught my interest from the beginning i can hardly wait!:D I need more germanese!