The NextGen OTL Worlda Series

i think it's based on one of the older worlda language maps from the wiki
I have the map I think you're talking about, and I've recognized various elements of it there, but Unkown00 obviously isn't trying to simply adapt that map to use NCS conventions; if they were, there wouldn't be any distinction between, say, Irish Americans and Anglo-Americans, because they both speak English.
 
Here are the Worlda Language maps, if anyone's curious:

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No idea how updated are they compared to the Next-gen Worlda (they look of a different size altogether) but could be a very useful source if updated. They're not free from weird things though and they often overrepresent minority languages. For example in Argentina, the proportion of Spanish speakers in Corrientes is larger than Guaraní speakers, though many in rural areas do have it as a second language. On the other hand, some native langauges are underrepresented, too, and let's not even get in the 'Bantu' catchall mess in Africa.

Still, a useful source.
 
So for sources I just Google random ethnic maps and I look at a few of them for the general idea. As for the language map, I use it either as a base map or I assume they overlap with ethnicity. Some like the Arabs state I used as a based map as I am aware that not all of the area is inhabitants.
 
So for sources I just Google random ethnic maps and I look at a few of them for the general idea. As for the language map, I use it either as a base map or I assume they overlap with ethnicity. Some like the Arabs state I used as a based map as I am aware that not all of the area is inhabitants.
Still some things are wierd though. I'm not from the US but I'm sure Finnish-Americans or German-Americans by large do not longer speak their original languages or identify themselves by their original nationalities. And I'm absolutely sure Brazilians consider themselves different from Portuguese and Mexicans from Spaniards. The way every nation or country or culture distinguishes ethnicity is also complex. Self-identification and language usually is a safe bet, but how there are places that overall speak the same language but are multiracial and/or multireligious, other cultures that are similar yet different or are in different countries (Belgium for example, are the Francophones there Walloons, French, or Belgians, maybe all three?) and so on.

An ethnicity map is inevitably fraught with doing such choices, so in any case it's a question of picking criteria and it'll never be exact. Can be a fun excersise however.
 
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Two things I have noticed and are mildly infuriating are the fact that Moldavia's northern border and Courland's borders in the late Medieval/Early Modern maps are wrong. Why are they different than the post-1900 maps?
 
Two things I have noticed and are mildly infuriating are the fact that Moldavia's northern border and Courland's borders in the late Medieval/Early Modern maps are wrong. Why are they different than the post-1900 maps?
oh and the borders of the italian states on the 1815 to 1885 maps are inconsistent with the rest of the maps
 
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New year, new maps.
Actual changes
  • Artsakh
Additions and changes
  • Colombia, Peru ([citation needed])
  • Kolchak's China; removed border dispute between Qinghai and Tibet
  • Sierra Leone, Ghana, Congo(-Brazzaville), South Sudan, Tanzania, Madagascar
 
First update of '21!
- Added links to the 1919 and 1936 maps (I swore I added those months ago, guess not)
- Added @tungsterismapping 's Austria and Ottoman internal divisions to the 1815 and 1914 maps
- Revised Prussia, Livonia, Poland and Lithuania from 1200 - 1776 AD.
- Added @erictom333 's 2021 map
 
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