The NextGen OTL Worlda Series

Don't suppose anyone can point me to any of the older maps that show the island groupings in the Pacific? I'm pretty sure I've got most of them right but the division of the Cook Islands and French Polynesia has me a bit stuck, even using reference maps.
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Something like this?
(This map is pretty incorrect but it does have the outline, so)
 
Already been done, happily. Might be a good idea to threadmark these.
Doesn't the key on the USA one have the colours the wrong way round?

EDIT (several hours later): I'm still working on the '1749' world-map, and hope to fix some more details tomorrow afternoon in which case I'll post its latest version here -- with a list of the additional changes made -- later in the day.
I've been trying to work out how this projection shows lines of longitude, which would be useful for showing the lines between Spanish & Portuguese claims set by the Treaty of Tordesillas & Treaty of Zaragossa, by looking at how the eastern border of Western Australia -- which follows basically the "Zaragossa" line -- is shown on existing maps: Apparently at that longitude it's "after each five pixels away from the equator, continue the line one pixel [further east if west of the Greenwich meridian, which is the standard Worldas' centreline] / [further west if east of the Greenwich meridian], as against a straight north-south line at the Meridian itself. Presuming that the proper length for those sections of the lines increases proportionately as one gets closer to the Meridian and decreases as one gets further away from it, I should be able to calculate the path of the "Tordesillas" line -- which I intend to show here -- with reasonable accuracy bearing in mind the limitations imposed by the map's scale.

Next grumble about NCS: The fact that its single colour/shade for 'terra nullius' leaves no way of showing easily whether that territory is actually unknown to "civilized" nations or is known to them but not yet claimed by any of them, or whether or not it is inhabited...
 
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Okay, here's the latest version of my '1749' map. Notes on the changes made since the most recent other version posted follow it.
Areas still definite needing more work are the sub-divisions of Spanish territory in South America, the native states in Sub-Saharan Africa, western Turkestan and the areas between central Iran & India, the states in India, the Malayan peninsula, and the East Indies.

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North America _
Spain's territorial claim north of the area where it abuts the Hudson Bay Company's claim has had its "hard" border [i.e. black line] removed, because the area hadn't yet been explored sufficiently for anybody to tell where the border should have been: Spanish exploration away from the coast that far north doesn't even start until the 1770s... And, anyway, technically at this point Spain still claims all of North America that it hasn't yet recognised by treaty as either British or French. (Yes, that includes all of Alaska: For that matter, Spain theoretically still claims all of the Pacific Islands east of the 'Treaty of Zaragossa' line, which means all of them except for those that are further west than the Marianas, as well...)

California: Lake Tulare has been added, taken from one of the other Worlda maps in this series. (At this period it was the largest freshwater lake, in what are now the OTL "Lower 48" states, west of the Great Lakes.)

Mexico _
The boundary in "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade that the earlier map placed in northern Mexico has been replaced by lines in the "Normal administrative divisions" shade instead, because it represented the southern boundary for the semi-autonomous 'Commandancy-General of the Provinces Internas' but that hasn't yet been established at this map's date. I have, however, used the "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade to show the boundaries of the 'Kingdom of Nueva Galicia' in western Mexico that was semi-autonomous from Mexico (although not from Spain) at this time. The line in alternating pixels [more or less] of those two shades that runs east from 'Nueva Galicia' marks the boundary between those of the other provinces that fall -- like Nuevea Galicia -- under the jurisdiction of the 'Real Audienca of Guadalara' and those [south of the line] that fall under the 'Real Audienca of Mexico' (whose jurisdiction also covers the 'Captain-Generalcy of Yucatan', as well, although not also the 'Captain-Generalcy of Guatemala' as that has a separate 'Real Audienca of Guatemala' all to itself: The pattern of Spanish colonial government is confusing!) instead.

The small area on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Cortez that I've shown in the "Spain with more autonomy" shade but with only a "tribal" border represents the territory of the Yaqui tribe, whom the Spanish basically left alone at this time because they were tough fighters and didn't really have anything that the Spanish regarded as worth the effort needed for seizing: A revolt by the Yaqui & their 'Mayo allies in 1730 had cost around a thousand Spanish lives (as against around 5'000 natives dead). They have been benefitting from Jesuit guidance since 1617, too, and at this date the Jesuits still have some political influence with the Spanish authorities. (Also, they seem to have been more resistant than most other Native American peoples to Old World diseases.)

Caribbean _
I have placed border-lines in the "exists above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade in the sea between Cuba and both Yucatan and Florida, and between San Domingo & Puerto Rico: Each of those three islands is a separate 'Captaincy General' within 'New Spain', like Yucatan itself or Guatemala (both of which already had such boundaries shown on land) whilst Florida is a province of New Spain (& is therefore more closely subject to the Viceroy in Mexico City) instead.

South America _
The provinces of Brazil have been marked out, as per the patch that (ADD NAME) recently-posted patch in this thread.
Additionally, the three provinces in the north-west have been separated from the others by a line in the "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade, because in fact during this period Brazil was run as two separate colonies with their own separate Governors-General i.e. the 'State of Brazil' south of that line and the 'State of Maranhão and Grão-Pará' to its north.

I have not adopted the full set of borders between these two "States" and the adjacent Spanish territories that that patch gives, however, because those didn't apply in 1749: They were decided by a treaty in 1750, but its terms couldn't be applied in full due to local resistance and so it was voided in 1761 until a very similar agreement was reached & applied in 1777. The borders already shown on the earlier-created '1748' map differ from these in several places in the south, and appear to give a more accurate view of the real situation "on the ground" there in 1749, although they're the same in the west & north... but neither set actually reflects the legal boundary in 1749, anyway. Until those treaties set agreed borders based mainly on the actual patterns of settlement, but with Portugal ceding its outpost on the Rio Plata in exchange for Spain withdrawing the seven Jesuit missions among the Guarani people that were situated west of the River Uruguay, the legal border was still that set by the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494! There were differing opinions about how that treaty's wording should be interpreted, and different calculations were consequently made about exactly where that line should run: The red line that I have placed running north-south through South America is meant to show the definition most favourable to Portugal. (Its northern end is placed with reasonable accuracy: I tried to work how this line would follow from there southwards by looking at some other Worldas' eastern border for Western Australia, which is also supposed to follow a single line of longitude, and then adjusting the number of pixels per segment proportionately [approximately] to these two lines relative distances from the Greenwich Meridian.) So, as you can see, even by the line most in their favour the Portuguese had expanded far beyond where the old treaty said they could: They actually started to do during the 'Iberian Union' period, when both countries having the same kings meant that the Spanish authorities were less concerned about the matter than might otherwise have been the case... On the other hand, the corresponding boundary between these two empires set by treaty for the other side of the world ran through the Marianas, so Spain shouldn't have gone anywhere nearer than Guam to the Philippines, which I suppose that might be seen as balancing the "illegal" growth of Brazil... Anyway, I have removed those sections of the "hard" border previously shown on the map that didn't already have settled territory on both sides, and left just the "claim" lines where the 1750 treaty would set borders through those areas instead. (For the sections that do have settled territory on both sides I have left the pre-treaty line, reflecting more-or-less the situation on the ground at that time, in place.)

The small area in & adjacent to the Guajira peninsula (where the boundary between Colombia-to-be & Venezuela meets the sea) marked with dots of 'terra nullius' is [approximately] the territory of the Wayuu tribe, who seem to have been in rebellion against Spanish rule more often that not for quite a while. (It would be shown in the "standard" diagonal lines to indicate rebellion if that area was actually wide enough for these to be practical...)

In the Spanish-owned parts of South America you will see several areas where the basic 'Spain' colour is marked with alternate stripes of its 'Spain with more autonomy' shade instead: These are [very approximately] the areas where the Jesuits ran communities of resettled natives outside of the provincial administrations' control.
The boundary already shown between the Viceroyalty of New Grenada and [to its south] the Viceroyalty of Peru has been darkened from the 'Normal administrative divisions' shade of grey to the 'Exists above/outside of the normal admin divisions' shade.
I have also placed a boundary in that 'Exists above/outside of normal admin divisions' shade to separate the Captaincy-General of Chile from the rest of the Viceroyalty of Peru. The section of this nearest the coast is probably more-or-less correct, but I had to try adapting the line shown on a map [in a different scale] that I found online for the inland section. Yes, it does include part of what IOTL is now eastern Argentina: That remains the case until the 'Rio de la Plata' becomes a separate viceroyalty in 1776.

Lake Poopó, in what we now call Bolivia, has been added. (This isn't in any way essential, but I just felt like adding it...)

British Isles _
The boundary between England & Scotland (which I added earlier) has been recoloured from 'Normal administrative divisions' to 'Above/outside normal administrative divisions' as more appropriate (because the "N.A.D's." would be the counties & boroughs/burghs on both sides of that line, instead).
I've placed a British "claim" box around Ireland as the best way that I could think of to show that it is still a separate Kingdom from the [same-coloured] 'Kingdom of Great Britain'.
I have deleted Rockall, because that minute "island" has no significance to anybody at all at the date of the map (or during the rest of the years that I intend my timeline to cover).
I have added St Kilda, which was absent from the earlier-created map that I'm adapting, because unlike Rockall it (a) is inhabited, and (b) might play a minor role in my timeline.

Europe _
Portugal & Spain: I have changed the border shown between these two nations slightly, to reflect the fact that Spain hadn't yet annexed the town of 'Olivença' [Port.] / 'Olivenza' [Span.].The actual difference isn't really a full pixel's-worth, but of course on this scale I was faced with a choice between that or nothing.

Hapsburg lands: 'Military Frontier' added, from Library of Alexandria's recently-posted patch for that in this period. I also had to modify Hungary's southern border in a couple of to match the version shown on that patch so that this addition would work properly, and used it to improve my previously hand-drawn version of Transylvania's western border as well. This whole process was complicated further by the fact that I'm still showing both the Hungary/Croatia border and the boundaries of the Banat of Temesvar too, but I think that it's now as close to that patch as I could get... which leaves hardly any of Croatia NOT covered either by the Military Frontier itself or by the internal boundary lines. I interpreted the colour-scheme used in the patch as meaning 'Austria with reduced autonomy' for the actual frontier districts and 'Above/outside normal administrative divisions' for their boundary with the other Hapsburg lands: Was that the intention, or should I change it?
Also, I have added the territory known in Magyar as the 'Kunság' to the east of Buda in central Hungary: This is a set of special districts whose people -- descendants of the Cuman and Jassic nomads, who settled in Hungary some time after the Magyars -- possess certain rights that their Magyar [or magyarised Slav] neighbours lack, which I have therefore coloured in the 'Austria with more autonomy' shade.
Also, I have added the areas in Transylvania where the Szekely people and the "Saxon" German settlers enjoy a degree of autonomy (with the Szekely at the eastern tip, and the Saxons to their west/south-west).
Also, in western Hungary, I have added Lake Balaton. (The patch showing Hungary's counties at a later date that I used for positioning the Kunság had this just as a black line, 2 pixels long, with an additional black dot connected diagonally at its eastern end: I've changed that to two blue pixels with a black border, because I don't use black-only lakes...) Possibly this should be moved 1 pixel westwards, I'll consider the matter further.

Poland-Lithuania: Although I am (as I already said) not going to include all of the 'Normal Administrative Unit' boundaries within this country, I have added the one between the Duchy of Samogita and the rest of Lithuanaia because -- as is shown by the shade into which I have now recoloured that area's land -- it enjoys greater autonomy than do the other parts of Lithuania. The 'Feudal Entity' boundary shade wouldn't be appropriate for it instead, because it was basically just a part of the crownlands (with relatively few nobles' estates) whose governor was locally elected rather than appointed.

Balkans: I have added Lake Ochrid, which IOTL today is on the eastern border of Albania..

Black Sea's northern coasts: Most of the coastal areas east of the "Danubian Principalities" but west of the northern Caucasus that were originally shown as 'Ottoman with more autonomy' have been recoloured to 'Ottoman with secondary autonomy', because they are occupied by members of the Nogai Horde which is actually a vassal of the Khanate of the Crimea (which is, and was & still is coloured as an Ottoman vassal) rather than of the Ottoman Empire itself. In the district sometimes [at least later] called 'Taurida', which is directly north of the Crimean peninsula, however, I have left stripes of the 'Ottoman with more autonomy' shade alternating with that other one to indicate that the Khanate has a direct presence there alongside the Nogai.
Also, I have added a single pixel in the plain 'Ottoman' shade near the north-eastern end of the Sea of Azof: This represents the fortified settlement of Azof itself, which was actually an Ottoman outpost during this period.

Middle East _
Georgia: The more westerly of the two areas that I had recoloured with the NCS shade for 'Georgia', the one [whose name, not shown on the map itself, was 'Imeretia'] with a coast on the Black Sea, turns out (a) to have been under Ottoman suzerainty and (b) to include at its northern end the territory of the non-Georgian 'Abkhaz' people (who are a branch of the Circassians, instead) who were separately subject to the Ottomans. I have therefore placed a border between these two parts, coloured that border & recoloured the one between Imeretia and the Ottomans' directly-ruled lands in the 'Feudal Entity' shade, and recoloured both parts as 'Ottoman with more autonomy'.

Kurdistan: A number of Kurdish statelets existed in the Ottomans' eastern borderlands, with autonomy under their own Emirs, and I have done my best to add these to the map. The Wikipedia article from which I took their details (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurdish_emirates) simply classified them as either 'Major' or 'Minor', with the associated map (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principality_of_Bitlis#/media/File:Kurdish_states_1835.png) -- which actually represents a somewhat later period, but it seems that there were few if any significant changes between the two dates-- calling those either Kingdoms or Principalities respectively, but another source that I found online indicated that there were two different levels of self-government involved: It seems that the 'Major' ones were actually separate vassal-states whereas the 'Minor' ones were just "normal" ["internal"] administrative districts for which the local Kurdish emirs were hereditary governors... For mapping purposes I'm so far giving both types the 'Ottoman with more autonomy' shade but differentiating them by type of boundary used. (The only map on this site that I've found already showing these is a QBam rather than a Worlda, and therefore capable of showing borders in finer detail, so I couldn't just copy these statelets across.)

Arabia: I've added a line of white dots linking the Mahra Sultanate to the island of Socotra, which it controlled, and recoloured that island accordingly from 'terra nullius' to the white that's normally used for states without colours of their own.
I've now given the coastal strip south-west of Muscat but east of Dhofar to the Muscat-based government rather than leaving it with the interior-based one as I'd previously done... No new evidence either way has come to my attention, but upon further thought this revised situation seems more likely.
Research indicates that most of the petty states that IOTL now form the U.A.E. had already been founded by this point, the sole exception being Abu Dhabi -- the most westerly of them -- where a suitable supply of drinking water hadn't yet been found. I've therefore detached these from Oman (under whose control that area was shown previously), modifying a patch cut-&-pasted from another map in this thread although because of the scale it can't show each & every one of them separately, and have recoloured that area in white as well.
Also added in white is the minor state of 'Narjan', which is situated just north-east of Yemen.

India _
Remember what I said before about the apparently-confused situation in Gujarat? I've now read a bit more about this, and it seems that the Moghuls were still appointing governors but that the Marathas generally -- when not fighting among themselves, as was already happening by this point -- exercised more control there on a day-to-day basis. For this reason, I have recoloured that province in the vertical stripes that denote joint control by those two powers. The smaller area to its west (next to Sindh), which previously was coloured solidly in the basic 'Mughal' shade, is the Kingdom of Kutch : This actually operated as a vassal of the Moghuls under a special arrangement, so I have therefore recoloured as 'Mughal with more autonomy'.
In Bengal, I have shown the state of Tripura as a vassal of the Moghul's [fairly autonomous, by this date] governor for that province, rather than as an integral part of his province. Reportedly it did enjoy this status back then, which was why it was recognised subsequently as a 'princely state' by the British. I've given it the same borders that its British-era & post-1947 versions, because those are basically the edges of the defensible hilly area: An adjacent section of lowlands that it formerly possessed as well was seized by the Mughals, and one name that the British used for this state -- to distinguish it from the administrative district of Bengal that had been formed from that lost area -- was 'Hill Tipperah'. The colour in which it's now shown here is 'Mughal with secondary autonomy'.
I have modified the way in which various European outposts are shown, both in Bengal and on the Malabar coast.

South-East Asia _
Burma: The '1748' Worlda map that I've been adapting correctly showed this country as having lost control of Pegu to an independent state and Tenasserim to the Thai kingdom of Ayuthya. However it seems that by this time Burmese control was also faltering elsewhere: The northern Thai kingdom of Lan Na, which the 1748 map showed as a Burmese vassal, had become fully independent; Manipur, shown on the earlier-created '1748' simply as undifferentiated Burmese territory, was apparently also fully independent by now and so is shown thus here (with its borders basically as they were later, because I lack information to the contrary) and with related tribes having rebelled against Burmese control to its north-east; and the Shan & Kachin states of the east & north-east had either become effectively independent or gone over to Qing suzerainty instead. I've tried to show these factors as best I can by using information from the 'Shan States' patch that (ADD NAME) posted earlier in this thread (although that seems actually to reflect the situation at some later date because it shows [at least] one division between states that didn't occur until after that area had fallen under British rule instead), Wikipedia's description of states and towns that were now under Qing control, and the OTL ROC's modern claims in northern Myanmar (because I presume that those are based on historical tributary arrangements that could date back to this period).
Also, I've shown a sea-border (in white dots) between the independent kingdom of Pegu in south-western border and the islands to the south-west of that, as those islands were apparently still 'terra nullius' when the British took control of the area.

Thailand: apparently the 1748 map was basically correct, although I need more data about the extent of its expansion southwards down the peninsula.

Laos: Shown on the 1748 map as divided into three kingdoms, one with a vassal state about a quarter of its size, which appears to be correct for this period (and now I even know what each of those states was called...), although I don't know enough to guarantee that the borders are completely right. The kingdoms were arranged in a north-south line, and on that earlier-created map only the middle one is given a colour rather than left just in white: NCS only has one colour for Laos (and, even then, that colour also has to serve double purpose as 'Minor China'), rather than a Primary/Secondary/Tertiary set as for some other cultures, but I'm currently using that colour for all three of them (with the vassal-state in its "with more autonomy" shade, of course) and relying on the border-lines to let people see that they're separate states: I don't see why any one of them would have a better claim to the colour than did the other two, and the only other "fair" choice would have been to leave all of them in white which of course would have made it impossible to see which member of the master/vassal pairing filled which of those roles.

Cambodia: This still owns a [very] small part of what IOTL is now southern Vietnam, and makes claims to rather more of that country where I decided that the least inaccurate way of showing the 1749 situation was with vertical lines alternating in these two countries' colours inside both Vietnam's national border and a Cambodian "claim" line.

Vietnam: The south of this country is effectively ruled by the head of the House of Nguyen as though it were a separate state, and the last remaining 'Cham' state there is a vassal to that lord rather than directly to the Emperor. I have therefore added a 'feudal' boundary north of the Nguyen domain, recoloured that domain as 'Vietnam with more autonomy', and recoloured the Cham state to 'Vietnam with secondary autonomy'. The Nguyen also have a vassal state (not shown at all on the earlier-created '1748' map) at the very southern [i.e. coastal] end of the border with Cambodia and also including an island that I have shown here although it was omitted from the '1748' map: This is the Principality of Hà Tiên, whose first ruler was a Chinese refugee from the Qing conquest of China -- as were some of his subjects -- and whose son by a Vietnamese woman has since succeeded him as lord there. As I have already mentioned, Cambodia still claims -- and has a limited degree of control over -- everything south of the remaining Cham state. The areas along the Laotian border that are coloured here in alternating lines of 'Vietnam with more autonomy' & 'Vietnam with secondary autonomy' are highlands inhabited largely by non-"Vietnamese" peoples who are only loosely under Nguyen control.
In the north of the country, the lands still controlled by the Emperor (or by his chief advisor, anyway) include a small area on the coast east of the OTL modern border with China: IOTL this remained Vietnamese until the French ceded it to China, in exchange for concession elsewhere, towards the end of the 19th century.

China _
See above re the border with Vietnam.

I have added the internal boundaries that grouped some sets of the provinces into larger administrative units. (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroys_in_China )

I have been using the patches for Qing territory & vassals that other contributors posted earlier in this thread, but have run into a couple of problems while doing so:
1/ There's the situation with the Burmese border & vassal states that I've already mentioned when discussing Burma;
2/ One patch says that it's appropriate for the period 1748-1776, so it should be useable for my map's 1749 date, but it shows the Dzungarian Khanate as already destroyed whereas the various sources that I've found (not just Wikipedia) agree that this didn't happen until the late 1750s instead... and the preceding patch in the chronological series, which does show the Dzungar Khanate as existing, is only labelled as appropriate for 1700-1715, leaving a 33-year gap in coverage...
I have used the "1748-1776" patch for determining the southern borders of Tibet, for now, because that matches better than the alternative choices with the borders shown on the '1748' map that I'm adapting and so looks less messy. However, I have given the Dzungars their border with China & its various dependencies as per the "1700-175' patch instead. (This is a situation about which I definitely need more information.)

Africa _
The two states in the 'Horn of Africa' that I'd previously recoloured from 'Ottoman with more autonomy' to white have now been given colours of their own: The more northerly of them, the Sultanate of Assua (which was run by members of the Afar people) is in the orange-brown that NCS specifies for Eritrea; the more southerly of them, the Emirate of Harar (which was run by speakers of a Semitic language that's related to Amharic) is in the blue that NCS specifies for 'Minor Abyssinia'.
 
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Okay, here's the latest version of my '1749' map. Notes on the changes made since the most recent other version posted follow it.
Areas still definite needing more work are the sub-divisions of Spanish territory in South America, the native states in Sub-Saharan Africa, western Turkestan and the areas between central Iran & India, the states in India, the Malayan peninsula, and the East Indies.

View attachment 731701


North America _
Spain's territorial claim north of the area where it abuts the Hudson Bay Company's claim has had its "hard" border [i.e. black line] removed, because the area hadn't yet been explored sufficiently for anybody to tell where the border should have been: Spanish exploration away from the coast that far north doesn't even start until the 1770s... And, anyway, technically at this point Spain still claims all of North America that it hasn't yet recognised by treaty as either British or French. (Yes, that includes all of Alaska: For that matter, Spain theoretically still claims all of the Pacific Islands east of the 'Treaty of Zaragossa' line, which means all of them except for those that are further west than the Marianas, as well...)

California: Lake Tulare has been added, taken from one of the other Worlda maps in this series. (At this period it was the largest freshwater lake, in what are now the OTL "Lower 48" states, west of the Great Lakes.)

Mexico _
The boundary in "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade that the earlier map placed in northern Mexico has been replaced by lines in the "Normal administrative divisions" shade instead, because it represented the southern boundary for the semi-autonomous 'Commandancy-General of the Provinces Internas' but that hasn't yet been established at the map's date. I have, however, used the "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade to show the boundaries of the 'Kingdom of Nuevo Galicia' in western Mexico that was semi-autonomous from Mexico (although not from Spain) at this time. The line in alternating pixels [more or less]of those two shades that runs east from 'Nuevo Galicia' marks the boundary between those of the other provinces that fall -- like Nueveo Galicia -- under the jurisdiction of the 'Real Audienca of Guadalara' and those [south of the line] that fall under the 'Real Audienca of Mexico' (whose jurisdiction also covers the 'Captain-Generalcy of Yucatan', as well, although not also the 'Captain-Generalcy of Guatemala' as that has a separate 'Real Audienca of Guatemala' all to itself: The pattern of Spanish colonial government is confusing!) instead.

The small area on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Cortez that I've shown in the "Spain with more autonomy" shade but with only a "tribal" border represents the territory of the Yaqui tribe, whom the Spanish basically left alone at this time because they were tough fighters and didn't really have anything that the Spanish regarded as worth the effort needed for seizing: A revolt by the Yaqui & their 'Mayo allies in 1730 had cost around a thousand Spanish lives (as against around 5'000 natives dead). They have been benefitting from Jesuit guidance since 1617, too, and at this date the Jesuits still have some political influence with the Spanish authorities. (Also, they seem to have been more resistant than most other Native American peoples to Old World diseases.)

Caribbean _
I have placed border-lines in the "exists above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade in the sea between Cuba and both Yucatan and Florida, and between San Domingo & Puerto Rico: Each of those three islands is a separate 'Captaincy General' within 'New Spain', like Yucatan itself or Guatemala (both of which already had such boundaries shown on land) whilst Florida is a province of New Spain (& is therefore more closely subject to the Viceroy in Mexico City) instead.

South America _
The provinces of Brazil have been marked out, as per the patch that (ADD NAME) recently-posted patch in this thread.
Additionally, the three provinces in the north-west have been separated from the others by a line in the "above/outside of normal admin divisions" shade, because in fact during this period Brazil was run as two separate colonies with their own separate Governors-General i.e. the 'State of Brazil' south of that line and the 'State of Maranhão and Grão-Pará' to its north.

I have not adopted the full set of borders between these two "States" and the adjacent Spanish territories that that patch gives, however, because those didn't apply in 1749: They were decided by a treaty in 1750, but its terms couldn't be applied in full due to local resistance and so it was voided in 1761 until a very similar agreement was reached & applied in 1777. The borders already shown on the earlier-created '1748' map differ from these in several places in the south, and appear to give a more accurate view of the actual situation "on the ground" there in 1749, although they're the same in the west & north... but neither set actually reflects the legal boundary in 1749, anyway. Until those treaties set agreed borders based mainly on the actual patterns of settlement, but with Portugal ceding its outpost on the Rio Plata in exchange for Spain withdrawing the seven Jesuit missions among the Guarani people that were situated west of the River Uruguay,the legal border was still that set by the Treaty of Tordesilas in 1494! There were differing opinions about how that treaty's wording should be interpreted, and different calculations were consequently made about exactly where that line should run: The red line that I have placed running north-south through South America is meant to show the definition most favourable to Portugal. (Its northern end is placed with reasonable accuracy: I tried to work how this line would follow from there southwards by looking at some other Worldas' eastern border for Western Australia, which is also supposed to follow a single line of longtitude, and then adjusting the number of pixels per segment proportionately [approximately] to these two lines relative distances from the Greenwhich Meridian.) So, as you can see, even by the line most in their favour the Portuguese had expanded far beyond where the old treaty said they could: They actually started to do during the 'Iberian Union' period, when both countries having the same kings meant that the Spanish authorities were less concerned about the matter than might otherwise have been the case... On the other hand, the corresponding boundary between these two empires set by treaty for the other side of the world ran through the Marianas, so Spain shouldn't have gone anywhere nearer than Guam to the Philippines, which I suppose that might be seen as balancing the "illegal" growth of Brazil... Anyway, I have removed thos sections of the "hard" border previously shown on the map that didn't already have settled territory on both sides, and left just the "claim" lines where the 1750 treaty would set borders through those areas instead. (For the sections that do have settled territory on both sides I have left the pre-treaty line, reflecting more-or-less the situation on the ground at that time, in place.)

The small area in & adjacent to the Guajira peninsula (where the boundary between Colombia-to-be & Venezuela mees the sea) marked with dots of 'terra nullius' is [approximately] the territory of the Wayuu tribe, who seem to have been in rebellion against Spanish rule more often that not for quite a while. (It would be shown in the "standard" diagonal lines to indicate rebellion if that area was actually wide enough for these to be practical...)

In the Spanish-owned parts of South America you will see several areas where the basic 'Spain' colour is marked with alternate stripes of its 'Spain with more autonomy' shade instead: These are [very approximately] the areas where the Jesuits ran communities of resettled natives outside of the provincial adminstrations' control.
The boundary already shown between the Viceryalty of New Grenada and [to its south] the Viceroyalty of Peru has been darkened from the 'Normal administrative divisions' shade of grey to the 'Exists above/outside of the normal admin divisions' shade.
I have also placed a boundary in that 'Exists above/outside of normal admin divisions' shade to separate the Captaincy-General of Chile from the rest of the Viceroyalty of Peru. The section of this nearest the coast is probably more-or-less correct, but I had to try adapting the line shown on a map [in a different scale] that I found online for the inland section. Yes, it does include part of what IOTL is now eastern Argentina: That remains the case until the 'Rio de la Plata' becomes a separate viceroyalty in 1776.

Lake Poopó, in what we now call Bolivia, has been added. (This isn't in any way essential, but I just felt like adding it...)

British Isles _
The boundary between England & Scotland (which I added earlier) has been recoloured from 'Normal administrative divisions' to 'Above/outside normal administrative divisions' as more appropriate (because the "N.A.D's." would be the counties & boroughs/burghs on both sides of that line, instead).
I've placed a British "claim" box around Ireland as the best way that I could think of to show that it is still a separate Kingdom from the [same-coloured] 'Kingdom of Great Britain'.
I have deleted Rockall, because that minute "island" has no significance to anybody at all at the date of the map (or during the rest of the years that I intend my timeline to cover).
I have added St Kilda, which was absent from the earlier-created map that I'm adapting, because unlike Rockall it (a) is inhabited, and (b) might play a minor role in my timeline.

Europe _
Portugal & Spain: I have changed the border shown between these two nations slightly, to reflect the fact that Spain hadn't yet annexed the town of 'Olivença' [P.] / 'Olivenza' [S.].The actual difference isn't really a full pixel's-worth, but of course on this scale I was faced with a choice between that or nothing.

Hapsburg lands: 'Military Frontier' added, from Library of Alexandria's recently-posted patch for that in this period. I also had to modify Hungary's southern border in a couple of to match the version shown on that patch so that this addition would work properly, and used it to improve my prevously hand-drawn version of Transylvania's western boder as well. This whole process was complicated further by the fact that I'm still showing both the Hungary/Croatia border and the boundaries of the Banat of Temesvar too, but I think that it's now as close to that patch as I could get... which leaves hardly any of Croatia NOT covered either by the Military Frontier itself or by the internal boundary lines. I interpreted the colour-scheme used in the patch as meaning 'Austria with reduced autonomy' for the actual frontier districts and 'Above/outside normal administrative divisions' for their boundary with the other Hapsburg lands: Was that the intention, or should I change it?
Also, I have added the territory known in Magyar as the 'Kunság' to the east of Buda in central Hungary: This is a set of special districts whose people -- descendants of the Cuman and Jassic nomads, who settled in Hungary some time after the Magyars -- possess certain rights that their Magyar [or Magyarised Slav] neighbours lack, which I have therefore coloured in the 'Austria with more autonomy' shade.
Also, I have added the areas in Transylvania where the Szekely people and the "Saxon" German settlers enjoy a degree of autonomy (with the Szekely at the eastern tip, and the Saxons to their west/south-west).
Also, in western Hungary, I have added Lake Balaton. (The patch showing Hungary's counties at a later date that I used for positioning the Kunság had this just as a black line, 2 pixels long, with an additional black dot connecteddiagonally at its eastern end: I've changed that to two blue pixels with a black border, becuase I don't use black-only lakes...) Possibly this should be moved 1 pixel westwards, I'll consider the matter further.

Poland-Lithuania: Although I am (as I already said) not going to include all of the 'Normal Administrative Unit' boundaries within this country, I have added the one between the Duchy of Samogita and the rest of Lithuanaia because -- as is shown by the shade into which I have now recoloured that area's land -- it enjoys greater autonomy than do the other parts of Lithuania. The 'Feudal Entity' boundary shade wouldn't be appropriate for it, because it was basically just a part of the crownlands (with relatively few nobles' estates) whose governor was locally elected rather than appointed.

Balkans: I have added Lake Ochrid, which IOTL today is on the eastern border of Albania..

Black Sea's northern coasts: Most of the coastal areas east of the "Danubian Principalities" but west of the northern Caucasus that were originally shown as 'Ottoman with more autonomy' have been recoloured to 'Ottoman with secondary autonomy', because they are occupied by members of the Nogai Horde which is actually a vassal of the Khanate of the Crimea (which is, and was & still is cloured as an Ottoman vassal) rather than of the Ottoman Empire itself. In the district sometimes [at least later] called 'Taurida', which is directly north of the Crimean peninsula, however, I have left stripes of the 'Ottoman with more autonomy' shade alternating with that other one to indicate that the Khanate has a direct prseence there alongside the Nogai.
Also, I have added a single pixel in the plain 'Ottoman' shade near the north-eastern end of the Sea of Azof: This represents the fortified settlment of Azof itself, which was actually an Ottoman outpost during this period.

Middle East _
Georgia: The more westerly of the two areas that I had recoloured with the NCS shade for 'Georgia', the one [whose name, not shown on the map itself, was 'Imeretia'] with a coast on the Black Sea, turns out (a) to have been under Ottoman suzerainty and (b) to include at its northern end the territory of the non-Georgian 'Abkhaz' people (who are a branch of the Circassians, instead) who were separately subject to the Ottomans. I have therefore placed a border between these two parts, coloured that border & recoloured the one between Imeretia and the Ottomans' directly-ruled lands in the 'Feudal Entity' shade, and recoloured both parts as 'Ottoman with more autonomy'.

Kurdistan: A number of Kurdish statelets existed in the Ottomans' eastern borderlands, with autonomy under their own Emirs, and I have done my best to add these to the map. The wikipedia article from which I took their details (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurdish_emirates) simply classifiied them as 'Major' or 'Minor', with the associated map (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principality_of_Bitlis#/media/File:Kurdish_states_1835.png) -- which actually represents a somewhat later period, but it seems that there were few if any significant changes between the two dates-- calling those either Kingdoms or Principalities respectively, but another source that I found online indicated that there were two different levels of sel-government involved: It seems that the 'Major' ones were actually separate vassal-states whereas the 'Minor' ones were just "normal" ["internal"] administrative districts within which the local Kurdish emirs were hereditary governors... For mapping purposes I'm so far giving both types the 'Ottoman with more autonomy' shade but differentiating them by type of boundary used. (The only map on this site that I've found already showing these is a QBam rather than a Worlda, and therefore capable of showing borders in finer detail, so I couldn't just copy these statelets across.)

Arabia: I've added a line of white dots linking the Mahra Sultanate to the island of Socotra, which it controlled, and recoloured that island accordingly from 'terra nullius' to the white that's normally used for states without colours of their own.
I've now given the coastal strip south-west of Muscat but east of Dhofar to the Muscat-based government rather than leaving it with the interior-based one as I'd previously done... No new evidence either way has come to my attention, but upon further thought this revised situation seems more likely.
Research indicates that most of the petty states that IOTL now form the U.A.E. had already been founded by this point, the sole exception being Abu Dhabi -- the most westerly of them -- where a suitable supply of drinking water hadn't yet been found. I've therefore detached these from Oman (under whose control that area was shown previously), modifying a patch cut-&-pasted from another map in this thread although because of the scale it can't show each & every one of them separately, and have recoloured that area in white as well.
Also added in white is the minor state of 'Narjan', which is situated just north-east of Yemen.

India _
Remember what I said before about the apparently-confused situation in Gujarat? I've now read a bit more about this, and it seems that the Moghuls were still appointing governors but that the Marathas generally -- when not fighting among themselves, as was already happening by this point -- exercised more control there on a day-to-day basis. For this reason, I have recoloured that province in the vertical stripes that denote joint control by those two powers. The smaller area to its west (next to Sindh), which previously was coloured solidly in the basic 'Mughal' shade, is the Kingdom of Kutch : This actually operated as a vassal of the Moghuls under a special deal, so I have therefore recoloured as 'Mughal with more autonomy'.
In Bengal, I have shown the state of Tripura as a vassal of the Moghul's [fairly autonomous, by this date] governor for that province, rather than as an integral part of his province. Reportedly it did enjoy this status back then, which was why it was recognised as a 'princely state' by the British. I've given it the same borders that its British-era & post-1947 versions, because those are basically the edges of the defensible hilly area: An adjacent section of lowlands that it formerly possessed as well was seized bythe Mughals, and one name that the British used for this state -- to distinguish it from the administrative district of Bengal thathad been formed from that lost area -- was 'Hill Tipperah'. The colour in which it's now shown here is 'Mughal with secondary autonomy'.
I have modified the way in which various European outposts are shown, both in Bengal and on the Malabar coast.

South-East Asia _
Burma: The '1748' Worlda map that I've been adapting correctly showed this country as having lost control of Pegu to an independent state and Tenasserim to the Thai kingdom of Ayuthya. However it seems that by this time Burmese control was also faltering elsewhere: The northern Thai kingdom of Lan Na, which the 1748 map showed as a Burmese vassal, had become fully independent; Manipur, shown on the earlier-created '1748' simply as undiferentiated Burmese territory, was apparently also fully independent by now and so is shown thus here (with its borders basically as they were later, because I lack information to the contrary) and with related tribes having rebelled against Burmese control to its north-east; and the Shan & Kachin states of the east & north-east had either become effectively independent or gone over to Qing suzerainty instead. I've tried to show these factors as best I can by using information from the 'Shan States' patch that WHIEVER posted earlier in this thread (although that seems actually to reflect the situation at some later date because it shows [at least] one division between states that didn't occur until after that area had fallen under British rule instead), Wikipedia's description of states and towns that were now under Qing control, and the ROC's modern claims in nothern Myanmar (because I presume that those are based on tributary arrangements that could date back to this period).
Also, I've shown a sea-border (in white dots) between the independent kingdom in south-western border and the islands to the south-west of that, as those islands were apparently still 'terra nullius' when the British took control of the area.

Thailand: apparently the 1748 map was basically correct, although I need more data about the extent of its expansion southwards down the peninsula.

Laos: Shown on the 1748 map as divided into three kingdoms, one with a vassal state about a quarter of its size, which appears to be correct for this period (and now I even know what each of those states was called...), although I don't know enough to guarantee that the borders are completely right. The kingdoms were arranged in a north-south line, and on that earlier-created map only the middle one is given a colour: NCS only has one colour for Laos (and, even then, that colour also has to serve double purpose as 'Minor China'), rather than a Primary/Secondary/Tertiary set as for some other cultures, but I'm currently using that colour for all three of them (with the vassal-state in its "with more autonomy" shade, of course) and relying on the borderlines to let people see that they're separate: I don't see why any one of them would have a better claim to the colour than did the other two, and the only other "fair" choice would have been to leave all of them in white which would have made it impossible to see which of the master/vassal pairing held which of those statuses.

Cambodia: This still owns a [very] small part of what IOTL is now southern Vietnam, and makes claims to rather more of that country where I decided that the least inacurate way of showing the 1749 situation was with vertical lines alternating in these two countries' colours inside both Vietnam's national border and a Cambodian "claim" line.

Vietnam: The south of this country is effectively ruled by the head of the House of Nguyen as though it were a separate state, and the last remaining 'Cham' state there is a vassal to that lord rather than directly to the Emperor. I have therefore added a 'feudal' boundary north of the Nguyen domain, recoloured that domain as 'Vietnam with more autonomy', and recoloured the Cham state to 'Vietnam with secondary autonomy'. The Nguyen also have a vassal state (not shown at all on the earlier-created '1748' map) at the very southern [i.e. coastal] end of the border with Cambodia and also including an island that I have shown here although it was omitted from the '1748' map: This is the Principality of Hà Tiên, whose first ruler was a Chinese refugee from the Qing conquest of China -- as were some of his subjects -- and whose son by a Vietnamese woman has since succeeded him as lord there. As I have already mentioned, Cambodia still claims -- and has a limited degree of control over -- everything south of the remaining Cham state.The areas along the Laotian border that are coloured here in alternating lines of 'Vietnam with more autonomy' & 'Vietnam with secondary autonomy' are highlands inhabited largely by non-"Vietnamese" peoples who are only loosely under the Nguyens' control.
In the north of the country, the lands still controlled by the Emperor (or by his chief advisor, anyway) include a small area on the coast east of the OTL modern border with China: IOTL this remained Vietnamese until the French ceded it to China, in echange for concession elsewhere, towards the end of the 19th century.

China _
See above re the border with Vietnam.

I have added the internal boundaries that grouped some sets of the provinces into larger adminsitrative units. (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroys_in_China )

I have been using the patches for Qing territory & vassals that other contributors posted earlier in this thread, but have run into a couple of problems while doing so:
1/ There's the situation with the Burmese border & vassal states that I've already mentioned when discussing Burma;
2/ One patch says that it's appropriate for the period 1748-1776, so it should be useable for my map's 1749 date, but it shows the Dzungarian Khanate as already destroyed whereas the various sources that I've found (not just Wikipedia) agree that this didn't happen until the late 1750s instead... and the preceding patch in the chronological series, which does show the Dzungar Khanate as existing, is only labelled as appropriate for 1700-1715, leaving a 33-year gap in coverage...
I have used the "1748-1776" patch for determining the southern borders of Tibet, for now, because that matches better than the alternative choices with the borders shown on the '1748' map that I'm adapting and so looks less messy. However, I have given the Dzungars their border with China & its various dependencies as per the "1700-175' patch instead. (This is a situation about which I definitely need more information.)

Africa _
The two states in the 'Horn of Africa' that I'd peviously recoloured from 'Ottoman with more autonomy' to white have now been given colours of their own: The more northerly of them, the Sultanate of Assua (which was run by members of the Afar people) is in the orange-brown that NCS specifies for Eritrea: The more southerly of them, the Emirate of Harar (which was run by speakers of a Semitic language that's related to Amharic) is in the blue that NCS specifies for 'Minor Abyssinia'.
I have map data on the Spanish colonies from 1750, would you be interested on those? Sidenote: It's Nueva Galicia not Nuevo, since Galilcia is a feminine word.
 
Still working on the 1749 map.
Currently doing the Russian governorates & their subordinate provinces, but apparently these were originally defined in terms of the cities that they contained rather than actual boundaries -- except for three single-province governorates in the north-west (Vyborg, Reval [Talinn], and Riga) whose boundaries were set by agreements with Sweden, and 'Kiev Governorate' which apparently had the same boundaries as the already-shown 'Cossack Hetmanate' (however well-defined those actually were... ) -- and I haven't yet been able to find out when that situation changed, so I'm putting in their administrative centres instead. My main tools for this are Google Maps and the WorldA base-map that shows rivers.
Governorate capitals are all placed, except for the four western ones already mentioned, and so are provincial capitals (or possible provincial capitals, anyway: Two different Wikipedia pages give conflicting information about whether one of the provinces existed separately at this date or had been merged with another, and I haven't been able to find information anywhere else on the 'net to clarify this...) for 'Siberia Governorate' as well: Tomorrow, hopefully, I'll manage the Orenburg, Kazan, and Archangelgorodsk, Governorates: After that it will might get easier or might get trickier instead (We'll have to see..), because the provincial centres will -- on average -- be closer together. (Three of the remaining Governorates have only a single Province each, however, and so won't need any provincial centres added at all: St Petersburg, Smolensk, and Astrakhan.)
 
Still working on the 1749 map.
Currently doing the Russian governorates & their subordinate provinces, but apparently these were originally defined in terms of the cities that they contained rather than actual boundaries -- except for three single-province governorates in the north-west (Vyborg, Reval [Talinn], and Riga) whose boundaries were set by agreements with Sweden, and 'Kiev Governorate' which apparently had the same boundaries as the already-shown 'Cossack Hetmanate' (however well-defined those actually were... ) -- and I haven't yet been able to find out when that situation changed, so I'm putting in their administrative centres instead. My main tools for this are Google Maps and the WorldA base-map that shows rivers.
Governorate capitals are all placed, except for the four western ones already mentioned, and so are provincial capitals (or possible provincial capitals, anyway: Two different Wikipedia pages give conflicting information about whether one of the provinces existed separately at this date or had been merged with another, and I haven't been able to find information anywhere else on the 'net to clarify this...) for 'Siberia Governorate' as well: Tomorrow, hopefully, I'll manage the Orenburg, Kazan, and Archangelgorodsk, Governorates: After that it will might get easier or might get trickier instead (We'll have to see..), because the provincial centres will -- on average -- be closer together. (Three of the remaining Governorates have only a single Province each, however, and so won't need any provincial centres added at all: St Petersburg, Smolensk, and Astrakhan.)
Managed the Orenburg Governorate's three outlying provincial capitals (presuming that Yekaterinburg was the capital for Iset Province, one of the few named after rivers rather than after their capitals, as it seems to have been the most important place there to the Russians...) and four of Kazan's five; also the headquarters of the five organised Cossack 'Hosts' then recognised in all of the lands from the Don to the Pacific (although there were numerous smaller groups of less extensively organised Cossacks there as well: the 'Siberian Host', for example, wasn't formally organised until some point in the 19th century although a high proportion of Siberia's non-deportee Russian population at this time were Cossacks), and of one group of Christianised Tatars who legally -- despite their separate origin -- held that same status; also, placed some rough boundary-lines -- in the colour for "disputed or uncertain" ones, at present -- between cities that were in different governorates.
 
Still working on the 1749 map.
Currently doing the Russian governorates & their subordinate provinces, but apparently these were originally defined in terms of the cities that they contained rather than actual boundaries -- except for three single-province governorates in the north-west (Vyborg, Reval [Talinn], and Riga) whose boundaries were set by agreements with Sweden, and 'Kiev Governorate' which apparently had the same boundaries as the already-shown 'Cossack Hetmanate' (however well-defined those actually were... ) -- and I haven't yet been able to find out when that situation changed, so I'm putting in their administrative centres instead. My main tools for this are Google Maps and the WorldA base-map that shows rivers.
Governorate capitals are all placed, except for the four western ones already mentioned, and so are provincial capitals (or possible provincial capitals, anyway: Two different Wikipedia pages give conflicting information about whether one of the provinces existed separately at this date or had been merged with another, and I haven't been able to find information anywhere else on the 'net to clarify this...) for 'Siberia Governorate' as well: Tomorrow, hopefully, I'll manage the Orenburg, Kazan, and Archangelgorodsk, Governorates: After that it will might get easier or might get trickier instead (We'll have to see..), because the provincial centres will -- on average -- be closer together. (Three of the remaining Governorates have only a single Province each, however, and so won't need any provincial centres added at all: St Petersburg, Smolensk, and Astrakhan.)
Woah! I've been working on 1750 in russia myself, and I hate to say it, but you're fucking nuts... it is incredibly annoying to set it up and I've had to take several breaks (which is why you haven't seen too much from me, lately...)
 
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