That's the point. The break with Rome needs to happen somehow, what with Katherine being so successful with sons...
(Anne was establishing herself as Lutheran, to be fair.)

I mean, I figured it was the point from a meta perspective, but in universe it's a pretty amateurish political misstep by the Vatican.
 
I realize Anne isn't a Lutheran IOTL. This is alternate history where she was discovered sending letters to Luther and being sympathetic with his views.
It’s too unlikely and frankly it needs to be removed. Why would Anne have Lutheran sympathies? There is no need for a break from Rome here. Especially since Anne publicly asked for forgiveness. And excommunicating one of the most powerful men in Europe’s one year old legitimate daughter for simply existing is practically ASB.
 
April 1525
April 1525: The first official act of Louis XIII establishes a Franco-Ottoman alliance against the Habsburg empire, infuriating Charles V. However, his anger quickly dissipates when he loses his wife, Empress Beatrice, to the plague. Devastated, he nevertheless holds himself together and soldiers on for his children. Despite this, his grief makes him much less competent and much more reckless than he used to be. Realizing this, he absconds to a monastery to recuperate from the harsh blows of life. He will need a new wife - and hopefully, one that can produce healthy sons - but right now, all he wonders is what he had done to offend God. Also, as both the Prince and Princess of Wales are of age, the marriage is consummated despite calls for its annulment (as Renee never gave up her sympathy for Luther's views).
 
July-December 1525
July 1525: The King of Portugal sees his son, Alfonso of Portugal, heir to the throne, betrothed to Princess Mary of England. The young Alfonso is ecstatic at his betrothal to the beautiful English girl, and has Alfonso, Maria, and Leonor write Mary letters. He also is considering his daughters betrothals.

September 1525: Anne Boleyn miscarries shortly after announcing her most recent pregnancy. This comes on the heels of the marriage of John II of Scotland and Margaret of England. Distraught, Anne finds little comfort in her husband or her entourage, as her closest companion, Renee of France, has left court with her husband for Ludlow, where they hope to take over more responsibility. So she turns to God. Her husband is equally devastated, especially as Prince Alfonso is sickly and needs to enter the church (this being the child Catherine of Aragon died to deliver) but instead looks for his own diversion. And he finds it in a new mistress: Jane Seymour. Nobody is aware at this point, but they do know that suddenly there is a space for John Seymour and some of his ambitious children. Jane pleases the King by taking in Blanche and Matilda Fitzroy.

November 1525: In Spain, plague kills Alfonso the spare to the throne of Castile and Aragon. Infante Juan is showing signs of developing slow for his age. Queen Isabella of Portugal nearly dies of a miscarriage upon hearing the news. She thus spends some time recuperating at a convent, where doctors confirm her childbearing days are over at only 23. Isabella recovers by Christmas and celebrates with her husband and daughter Maria, who is currently unbetrothed.

December 1525: Henry, Prince of Wales celebrates Christmas by impregnating his bride. It seems, in part, a love match. Preparations begin for Prince Henry to receive more control over the government.
 
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January-December 1526
January 1526: King Louis XIII and Queen Elizabeth of France consummate their marriage. Meanwhile, tensions rise between the King and the Prince of Wales, due to the Prince of Wales' agreement with his wife's Lutheran views. Unfortunately, the marriage cannot be annulled due to Renee's pregnancy. Louis XIII also agrees to cede Burgundy to Charles V, also abandoning French claims to Flanders, Artois, Naples and Milan. Isabella, Dowager Queen of Denmark dies and a new struggle for the regency begins to erupt. Henry VIII's organisational and leadership abilities are succinctly alluded to in the preamble of the Eltham Ordinances of January 1526, the intention of which was to reduce the number of hangers-on and scroungers the king allowed into his presence

February 1526: Isabella of Portugal dies of plague. Her grief-stricken husband seeks for a new wife, as does his brother Charles. Queen Eleanor of Portugal becomes pregnant again. Thomas Wyatt separates from his wife, Elizabeth Brooke, and once again renews his love suit to the queen. Unfortunately for him, Queen Anne Boleyn becomes pregnant again, and his love letter to the queen is read by the king instead.

March 1526: Jane Seymour announces her first pregnancy. She and her husband, Henry Fitzalan, are delighted. Henry VIII is not. Queen Margaret of Scotland (Henry VIII's daughter, not sister) becomes pregnant. Mary Boleyn, sister of the queen, dies of a miscarriage and this plunges Queen Anne into a state of intense grief, as the sisters had been quite close.

April 1526: Babur becomes Mughal emperor, invading Northern India and capturing Delhi. The Mughal dynasty has now officially began, the European kings (Charles V, Henry VIII and Louis XIII) all plot to see how they can benefit from this. Sweating sickness once again sweeps over England. Eustace Chapuys, the imperial ambassador, dies of the sweating sickness as does the young Princess Anne of England.

May 1526: Henry VIII suffers another jousting accident, his horse was accidentally killed. The king is infuriated by this, especially as the dead horse had landed on his arm as he was unhorsed. His arm is broken and he cannot write. His wife, Queen Anne tries to persuade him to enjoy a different sport, earning his ire. As a result of the Franco-Ottoman alliance, an anti-French league is formed by the Pope, Genoa, Venice, Florence and Milan.

June 1526: Emperor Go-Nara ascends to the throne of Japan. Charles V returns from the monastery and retakes the reins of power. However, he still makes no moves to find a wife. He has buried many of them already. The Diet of Speyer convenes, resulting in the Edict of Speyer which suspended the 1521 Edict of Worms. This meant the papal ban on Luther's teachings has been revoked.

July 1526: Milan is captured by the Spanish. Martin Luther is discovered dead in a tavern. This causes an uproar and suddenly his teachings spread much faster. Elizabeth Blount returns to court and rekindles her affair with the king, much to the queen's ire. Meanwhile, Princess Mary falls sick.

August 1526: Renee, Princess of Wales gives birth to a daughter named Katherine, after her mother-in-law. Jane Seymour refuses to become physically intimate with the king due to her loyalty to Queen Anne, much to his anger. But it does not help her: Queen Anne does not believe that she hadn't had sex with Henry, regardless of the pleas of Jane's husband. Claude, Duke of Guise and Antoinette de Bourbon welcome another son named Claude after his father. The Battle of Mohacs results in the death of Suleiman I, the Ottoman Sultan. An Anglo-French agreement is made, where both countries promise not to make treaties with Charles V. Mary recovers.

September 1526: Queen Elizabeth of France gives birth to her first son, christened Henry after her father. The new Dauphin is betrothed to his cousin, Princess Katherine of Wales. Michelangelo is commissioned to create a sculpture of the French king and queen. Wolsey's aspirations to the papacy are displeasing to Queen Anne, but she is not in a strong position and cannot stop him.

October 1526: Bishop Tunstall claims there are over two thousand errors in Tyndal's New Testament. Louis XIII of France decides to organize another diplomatic meeting with England and Spain; the Franco-Ottoman alliance is greatly strained now that Suleiman is dead.

November 1526: Queen Eleanor of Portugal gives birth to another daughter named Joanna after her mother. Mary, Dowager Queen of Hungary expels Jewish people from Hungary. A struggle for Hungary erupts between Louis III (de facto ruled by Mary), as well as John Zapolya. Catherine Jagiellon, Princess of Poland is born. Queen Anne of England gives birth to a stillborn daughter, further straining the relationship between herself and her husband.

December 1526: Jane Seymour gives birth to her first son, a strong and healthy boy called Edward after her brother. Seeing her rival (although Jane never perceived Anne as one) succeed where she could not, Queen Anne withdraws further into herself. Pope Clement VII publishes decree Cum ad Zero, forming the Inquisition. Queen Margaret of Scotland (the younger) gives birth to a son named after her father.


@isabella help idk who Charles could marry ITTL
@EdwardRex do you want to elaborate on Denmark/Norway/Sweden right now? or about Martin Luther?
 
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January 1526: King Louis XIII and Queen Elizabeth of France consummate their marriage. Meanwhile, tensions rise between the King and the Prince of Wales, due to the Prince of Wales' agreement with his wife's Lutheran views. Unfortunately, the marriage cannot be annulled due to Renee's pregnancy. Louis XIII also agrees to cede Burgundy to Charles V, also abandoning French claims to Flanders, Artois, Naples and Milan. Isabella, Dowager Queen of Denmark dies and a new struggle for the regency begins to erupt. Henry VIII's organisational and leadership abilities are succinctly alluded to in the preamble of the Eltham Ordinances of January 1526, the intention of which was to reduce the number of hangers-on and scroungers the king allowed into his presence

February 1526: Isabella of Portugal dies of plague. Her grief-stricken husband seeks for a new wife, as does his brother Charles. Queen Eleanor of Portugal becomes pregnant again. Thomas Wyatt separates from his wife, Elizabeth Brooke, and once again renews his love suit to the queen. Unfortunately for him, Queen Anne Boleyn becomes pregnant again, and his love letter to the queen is read by the king instead.

March 1526: Jane Seymour announces her first pregnancy. She and her husband, Henry Fitzalan, are delighted. Henry VIII is not. Queen Margaret of Scotland (Henry VIII's daughter, not sister) becomes pregnant. Mary Boleyn, sister of the queen, dies of a miscarriage and this plunges Queen Anne into a state of intense grief, as the sisters had been quite close.

April 1526: Babur becomes Mughal emperor, invading Northern India and capturing Delhi. The Mughal dynasty has now officially began, the European kings (Charles V, Henry VIII and Louis XIII) all plot to see how they can benefit from this. Sweating sickness once again sweeps over England. Eustace Chapuys, the imperial ambassador, dies of the sweating sickness as does the young Princess Anne of England.

May 1526: Henry VIII suffers another jousting accident, his horse was accidentally killed. The king is infuriated by this, especially as the dead horse had landed on his arm as he was unhorsed. His arm is broken and he cannot write. His wife, Queen Anne tries to persuade him to enjoy a different sport, earning his ire. As a result of the Franco-Ottoman alliance, an anti-French league is formed by the Pope, Genoa, Venice, Florence and Milan.

June 1526: Emperor Go-Nara ascends to the throne of Japan. Charles V returns from the monastery and retakes the reins of power. However, he still makes no moves to find a wife. He has buried many of them already. The Diet of Speyer convenes, resulting in the Edict of Speyer which suspended the 1521 Edict of Worms. This meant the papal ban on Luther's teachings has been revoked.

July 1526: Milan is captured by the Spanish. Martin Luther is discovered dead in a tavern. This causes an uproar and suddenly his teachings spread much faster. Elizabeth Blount returns to court and rekindles her affair with the king, much to the queen's ire. Meanwhile,

August 1526: Renee, Princess of Wales gives birth to twin daughters named Katherine and Anne, after her two mothers-in-law. Jane Seymour refuses to become physically intimate with the king due to her loyalty to Queen Anne, much to his anger. But it does not help her: Queen Anne does not believe that she hadn't had sex with Henry, regardless of the pleas of Jane's husband. Claude, Duke of Guise and Antoinette de Bourbon welcome another son named Claude after his father. The Battle of Mohacs results in the death of Suleiman I, the Ottoman Sultan. An Anglo-French agreement is made, where both countries promise not to make treaties with Charles V.

September 1526: Queen Elizabeth of France gives birth to her first son, christened Henry after her father. The new Dauphin is betrothed to his cousin, Princess Katherine of Wales. Michelangelo is commissioned to create a sculpture of the French king and queen. Wolsey's aspirations to the papacy are displeasing to Queen Anne, but she is not in a strong position and cannot stop him.

October 1526: Bishop Tunstall claims there are over two thousand errors in Tyndal's New Testament. Louis XIII of France decides to organize another diplomatic meeting with England and Spain; the Franco-Ottoman alliance is greatly strained now that Suleiman is dead.

November 1526: Queen Eleanor of Portugal gives birth to another daughter named Joanna after her mother. Mary, Dowager Queen of Hungary expels Jewish people from Hungary. A struggle for Hungary erupts between Louis III (de facto ruled by Mary), as well as John Zapolya. Catherine Jagiellon, Princess of Poland is born. Queen Anne of England gives birth to a stillborn daughter, further straining the relationship between herself and her husband.

December 1526: Jane Seymour gives birth to her first son, a strong and healthy boy called Edward after her brother. Seeing her rival (although Jane never perceived Anne as one) succeed where she could not, Queen Anne withdraws further into herself. Pope Clement VII publishes decree Cum ad Zero, forming the Inquisition. Queen Margaret of Scotland (the younger) gives birth to a son named after her father.


@isabella help idk who Charles could marry ITTL
@EdwardRex do you want to elaborate on Denmark/Norway/Sweden right now? or about Martin Luther?
Perhaps he stays unmarried, at least for a little while? He has two sons who are healthy.
It doesn’t need elaboration, though I think it would be easier if you just kept Isabella alive to avoid subplot drama. Luther is rather irrelevant, seeing as no major ruler even supports him.
Also, who so many twins? Everyone is having twins constantly. Let’s take a break from twins. I also think you are trying to cover too much (even going outside of Europe), and we don’t want too much going on,
 
Perhaps he stays unmarried, at least for a little while? He has two sons who are healthy.
It doesn’t need elaboration, though I think it would be easier if you just kept Isabella alive to avoid subplot drama. Luther is rather irrelevant, seeing as no major ruler even supports him.
Also, who so many twins? Everyone is having twins constantly. Let’s take a break from twins. I also think you are trying to cover too much (even going outside of Europe), and we don’t want too much going on,
I'll edit out one of the twins. As a twin, I'm very biased towards them (I wrote three sets, right?). Got it
 
1527
OOC: Because I feel bad for Anne Boleyn, I am going to say that Princess Anne nearly died of the sweating sickness, simply because I want her to live. You will understand why as the chapter goes on.

January 1527: On New Years Day, both Emperor Charles and his brother King Ferdinand make vows of chastity for five years and declare they will remain celibate and probably never get remarried. King Louis XIII of France and Queen Elizabeth invite Henry VIII and his closest courtiers to Paris for a grand meeting of the Kings of England and France. Henry embarks on January 4 to see his daughter for the first time in years. Louis prepares to receive the English king and his delegation at Boulogne, but as the appointed date comes for arrival, Louis, with his wife Elizabeth in tow, are left at port with no arrival. Days pass, and there is no word. Eventually, the King hears word that the ship carrying the King and Queen crashed in Normandy. The King and Queen of England are dead. King Louis and Queen Elizabeth are horrified.

February 1527: The reign of Henry IX begins rather smoothly after he takes control in London with his wife and siblings. Henry is already very popular with the nobles, who had been growing discontent with the constant Anne Boleyn drama. King Henry and Queen Anne are buried in Westminster Abbey.

March 1527: The Dauphin is betrothed to the infant Infanta Juana of Portugal.

April-June 1527: Henry IX tries to settle the fates of his siblings. Elizabeth and Margaret are already married, and Mary and Edward are in firm betrothals. Alfonso is currently slated for the church, while Cecily might be too (Henry VIII never quite decided). Edmund will probably wed a local heiress. Princess Anne, the sole child of Anne Boleyn, is offered to the Duke of Rothesay.

September 1527: King Henry and Queen Renee make a point to publicly announce their Catholicism after rumors were flying of continued Lutheran sympathies.

December 1527: Edward, Duke of York marries Eleanor of Scotland. He celebrates his new bride with the money his brother has given him. Henry IX, King of England sends his sister Mary to be raised amongst the Portuguese, as she finds England depressing after the death of her father. It seems Mary will be the next Queen of Portugal. She arrives in Lisbon on Christmas Eve, just in time to celebrate with her new family.
 
1527 Family Trees
A list of various family trees:

Let me know if I missed anything/anyone! I tried to consolidate any conflicting information within the timeline. Any children not named got given whatever name I thought made sense.

The Tudors

Henry VIII, King of England (1491-1527) m. Catherine of Aragon (1485-1523) m. Anne Boleyn (1501-1527) r. Elizabeth Blount (1498-1527) r. Mary Boleyn, Countess of Richmond (1500-1526)

1a. Stillborn Daughter (1510)

2a. Henry, Prince of Wales (1511-) m. Renee, Princess of France (1510-)
1a. Catherine, Princess of England (1526-)​

3a. Miscarried Son (1511)

4a. Elizabeth of England (1512-) m. Louis XIII of France (1512-)
  • see France for issue
5a. Margaret of England (1513-) m. John II of Scotland (1514-)
  • see Scotland for issue
6a. Edward, Duke of York (1514-) m. Eleanor of Scotland (1513-)

7a. Mary, Princess of England (1516-) b. Alfonso, Prince of Portugal (1516-)

8c. Blanche Fitzroy (1516-1520)

9a. Cecily, Princess of England (1518 -) -in a convent, possibly taking vows-

10c. Thomas Fitzroy, Earl of Rutland and March (1519-)

11a. John, Duke of Richmond (1519-1521)

12a. Alfonso, Duke of Somerset (1519-1519)

13a. Catherine, Princess of England (1520-1521)

14a. Edmund, Duke of Bedford (1521-)

15c. Blanche Fitzroy (1521-)

16d. Matilda Fitzroy (1521-)

17a. Miscarriage (1521)

18a. Alfonso, Duke of Somerset (1523-) -in a monastery, possibly taking vows-

19b. Anne, Princess of England (1524-)

20b. Miscarriage (1525)

--

The Trastamaras

Ferdinand II, King of Aragon (1452-1512) m. Isabella I, Queen of Castile (1451-1504) m. Germaine de Foix (1488-1518)

1a. Isabella, Princess of Asturias (1470-1498) m. Alfonso, Prince of Portugal (1475-1491) m. Manuel I, King of Portugal (1469-1517)
1a. Miguel, Prince of Portugal (1498-1500)​

2a. Miscarried Son (1475)

3a. Juan, Prince of Asturias (1478-1497) m. Margaret of Burgundy (1480-1521)
1a. Stillborn Daughter (1497)​

4a. Juana I, Queen of Castile and Aragon (1479-1521) m. Philip, Duke of Burgundy (1478-1506) m. Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk (1484-1524)
  • had issue, shown below
5a. Maria, Infanta of Castile and Aragon (1482-1516) m. Manuel I, King of Portugal (1469-1517)
  • had issue
6a. Stillborn Daughter (1482)

7a. Catalina, Infanta of Castile and Aragon (1485-1523) m. Arthur, Prince of Wales (1486-1502) m. Henry VIII, King of England (1491-1526)
  • had issue by second husband
8b. Juan, Prince of Girona (1509-1509)


Juana I, Queen of Castile and Aragon (1479-1521) m. Philip, Duke of Burgundy (1478-1506) m. Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk (1484-1524)

1a. Eleanor of Burgundy (1498 -) m. William I, Holy Roman Emperor (1494-1514) m. John III, King of Portugal (1502-)
  • had issue by second husband
2a. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (1500-) m. Mary, Princess of England (1496-1514) m. Anna, Princess of Hungary (1594-1517) m. Beatrice of Portugal (1504-1525)
1a. Stillborn Daughter (1514)​
2b. Philip, Archduke of Austria (1517-1517)​
3c. Philip, Archduke of Austria (1524-)​
4c. Maximilian, Archduke of Austria (1524-)​

3a. Isabella of Burgundy (1501-1526) m. Christian II, King of Denmark (1481-1521)
1a. John, Prince of Denmark (1517-1520)​
2a. Dorothea I of Denmark (1518 -)​
3a. Stillborn Son (1519)​
4a. Isabella, Princess of Denmark (1520-)​
5a. Christina, Princess of Denmark (1521-) -in a convent, probably taking vows-​

4a. Ferdinand VI, King of Castile and Aragon (1503-) m. Isabella, Infanta of Portugal (1503-1526)
1a. Ferdinand, Prince of Asturias (1517-)​
2a. Isabella, Infanta of Castile and Aragon (1518 -)​
3a. Juana, Infanta of Castile and Aragon (1520-)​
4a. Alfonso, Duke of Cadiz (1521-1525)​
5a. Miscarriage (1525)​

5a. Mary of Burgundy (1505-) m. Louis II, King of Hungary (1506-1524)

1a. Louis III, King of Hungary (1520-)​
2a. Anna, Princess of Hungary (1523-)​
3a. Maria, Princess of Hungary (1523-)​

6a. Catherine of Burgundy (1507-) m. Charles III, Duke of Savoy (1486-)
  • had issue
7b. Eleanor Brandon (1514-)

8b. Margaret Brandon (1517-)

--

The Avis



John III, King of Portugal (1502-) m. Eleanor of Burgundy (1498 -)

1a. Miscarriage (1515)

2a. Alfonso, Prince of Portugal (1516-) b. Mary of England (1516-)

3a. Maria, Infanta of Portugal (1518 -)

4a. Leonor, Infanta of Portugal (1521-)

5a. Beatriz, Infanta of Portugal (1522-1522)

6a. Felipe, Duke of Beja (1524-)

7a. Juana, Infanta of Portugal (1526-)

--

The Valois



Louis XII, King of France (1462-1512) m. Jeanne, Duchess of Berry (1464-1505) -annulled 1498- m. Anne, Duchess of Brittany (1477-1515)

1b. Claude, Princess of France (1499-1518) m. Charles III, Duke of Savoy (1486-)
  • had issue
2b. Stillborn Son (1500)

3b. Stillborn Son (1503)

4b. Renee, Princess of France (1510-) m. Henry IX, King of England (1511-)
  • had issue
5b. Louis XIII, King of France (1512-) m. Elizabeth, Princess of England (1512-)

1a. Henri, Dauphin of France (1526-)​

6b. Charles, Duke of Berry (1512-1513)

7b. Jean, Duke of Berry (1513-1515)

--

The Lorraines

Francis I, Duke of Lorraine (1517-) m. Anne of Cleves (1515-)

--

The Savoyards

Charles III, Duke of Savoy (1486-) m. Claude, Princess of France (1499-1518) m. Catherine of Burgundy (1507-)

1a. Stillborn Son (1517)

2a. Claude of Brittany (1518 -)

3b. Philip of Savoy (1524-)

--

The Stewarts

John II, King of Scotland (1514-) m. Margaret, Princess of England (1513-)

1a. Henry, Duke of Rothesay (1526-)
 
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1528
January 1528: Catherine, Duchess of Savoy is pregnant, as is Queen Renee of England. In Sweden, Gustav Vasa attempts to start an uprising against the rule of Dorothea I of Denmark. He is not successful, but the young queen is paranoid of Swedish nobles from then on. John Zapolya is found dead in his bedroom, it looks as if he had suffered heart attack, but Mary, Dowager Queen of Hungary is looked at with suspicion. Queen Eleanor of Portugal becomes pregnant.

February 1528: Queen Elizabeth of France becomes pregnant again. A peasant uprising in Sweden occupies Dorothea's attention - although the leader is captured and the campaign ultimately crushed, she is still terrified of being deposed, and agrees to many conditions set by the rebels. Some of this included lowering of taxes and the return of church bells which her father had confiscated.

March 1528: Margaret, Queen of Scotland becomes pregnant. Alfonso, Prince of Portugal and Mary, Princess of England marry in a grand ceremony and consummate quickly, however they are then ordered to live separately until both become more physically mature. Claude of Savoy is betrothed to Felipe, Duke of Beja. As a second royal son, he suits the requirements for the husband of the Duchess of Brittany. Young Felipe is shipped over to Savoy and they are married in a smaller ceremony.

April 1528: Bubonic plague sweeps over England, notably taking Edmund, Duke of Bedford and Matilda Fitzroy. Jane Seymour becomes pregnant.

May 1528: Charles III of Savoy dies, leaving his son, Philip as the new Duke. The new Duke is betrothed to Maria, Princess of Hungary.

June 1528: The army of Burgundy occupies Utrecht, and a drought in Henan, China wipes out large numbers of people. Charles V establishes trading relations by delivering water to them, asking for goods in return. Queen Renee is discovered partaking of the Eucharist in the Protestant manner. She becomes very unpopular, with some nobles suggesting that she stand on trial for heresy. She made confession, but notably refused to take part in Catholic worship, citing her pregnancy.

July 1528: Margaret Tudor, Dowager Queen of Scotland (not her niece, current queen of Scotland) dies of a miscarriage. She is buried in a lavish tomb and her second husband and children mourn her deeply. Her niece almost miscarries at the sight of her aunt's coffin, but the child is not yet lost.

August 1528: John II of Scotland falls ill and is bedridden for a month. He recovers, and the illness is attributed to grief over his mother.

September 1528: Queen Eleanor of Portugal prematurely gives birth to a son named after his father. The small, sickly baby clings to life and John is overjoyed at the new son. Charles V is made the child's godfather, but his grief over his own lost sons almost ruin the ceremony.

October 1528: Catherine, Duchess of Savoy gives birth to a daughter named after herself. She then rules as regent on behalf of her young son. Renee, Queen of England gives birth to another daughter named Anne after her late stepmother-in-law. The queen of England then withdraws from court celebrations, as the labor had been very difficult, but it is quite suspicious that she would again miss the opportunity to take part in Mass alongside her husband.

November 1528: Queen Elizabeth of France gives birth to a daughter named after herself. Queen Renee of England returns to court, noticeably more reserved and taciturn than she had been. Despite this, the marriage between Henry IX and his wife remains as strong as ever. It is rumored that the queen could even be pregnant again, so soon after her last childbirth. Certainly the king and queen spend a lot of time in bed, much to the irritation of their council.

December 1528: Margaret, Queen of Scotland gives birth to another son, named John after her husband. She was disappointed, as she had hoped for a namesake daughter. Jane Seymour prematurely gives birth to a girl named after her mother.
 
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1529
January 1529: The King of Scots agrees to marry his eldest son to Anne Tudor, while the Duke of Ross is betrothed to Anne of England, Henry IX’s second daughter. John and Henry also sign a peace treaty.

February 1529: Else than the sickliness of Infante John, Portugal has another problem. Prince Alfonso and Princess Mary, quite mature already, have decided to secretly consummate their marriage again for her birthday. Mary is now pregnant. King John writes an apology letter to the King of England and expresses concern over the Princess’s health. Fortunately, all the daughters of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon grow very fast and are very beautiful (one French poet frequently commented on the size of the Queen of France’s ‘pretty duckies’). The Princess of Portugal is duly accepted into the royal family, and gives birth to a daughter, Beatriz of Portugal, later in the year, who joins her aunts in the royal nursery. Eleanor of Austria shuns her daughter-in-law along with her husband, and spends all her time nursing the Infante John.

May 1529: The Queen of France is pregnant again. In November, she gives birth for a second time, this one successfully. This child, a daughter, is named Charlotte, and Elizabeth of England thrills in her living child (the previous child, another daughter named Elisabeth, had died two month after birth in January 1529).

Eleanor Brandon is married to George Boleyn, brother of the dead Queen, Anne Boleyn.

July 1529: Renee of France once again declares she is not Protestant. Frankly, she is tired of the false rumors.

The Queen of Portugal’s youngest son’s health seems to be getting better, until the Infante John chokes in his sleep, leaving Eleanor of Austria a grieving mess. Troubled by his wife's severe reaction, John of Portugal suggests she take time to prepare for a meeting between herself and her brother Ferdinand.

August 1529: Ferdinand VI of Spain betroths his son to Princess Anna of Hungary.

November 1529: Mary of Hungary dies of an infection. Mary of Austria sends the court into mourning.

December 1529: Renee of France, Queen of England, unfortunately miscarries her third child.

Meanwhile, Eleanor of Scotland gives birth to a daughter of her own, Margaret of York. Edward of York celebrates the best way that he can. He gets drunk. Henry IX notes that his brother is a drunk, his wife a very stupid woman and pities little Margaret. But his Queen is excited to have a baby around her and grateful to have a project following her miscarriage. That takes the sting off when Princess Mary of Portugal announces yet another pregnancy, so soon after her last.
 
1530
January 1530: Queen Eleanor of Portugal becomes pregnant again. She enters confinement early and prays day and night for the health of her unborn child. King John is less concerned, even as he still grieves for their lost children. Queen Renee of England also becomes pregnant again and she is very excited.

February 1530: Charles V proposes marriage to the young Princess Cecily of England. A flirtatious, openly sexual girl who resented her sister's glittering foreign marriage, she had been proving herself blatantly unsuitable for life at a convent and happily accepts the proposal. Henry IX offers Charles a large dowry for his sister (he is secretly very relieved to get her out of the convent where she had caused scandal after scandal), and Charles promises to not consummate the marriage until she reaches physical maturity - his vow of celibacy hasn't ended yet. Queen Margaret of Scotland becomes pregnant again. Charles V is crowned emperor in Bologna by Pope Clement VII.

March 1530: Cecily of England arrives at Bologna, where she is welcomed by her new husband. They marry quickly, both finding each other very attractive, but Charles refuses to sleep with her, much to her ire. But she is given a court of her own and he does listen to some of her advice, which satisfies some of her ambitions. Margaret Brandon, meanwhile, finds herself falling for Thomas Fitzroy - which the king and queen do not support. Thomas Fitzroy himself, meanwhile, finds himself very smitten with Katherine Parr, who had previously been the Duke of York's lover. A famous incident occurs where Margaret Brandon pulled out a chunk of Katherine Parr's hair in front of a horrified Queen Renee. Queen Elizabeth of France becomes pregnant.

April 1530: Queen Elizabeth of France finally makes her trip to England, where she reunites with some of her siblings. She then spends her pregnancy in England, instead of returning quickly like she had planned. Eleanor Brandon becomes pregnant.

May 1530: Dorothea I of Denmark marries Frederick II, Elector Palatine. He is much older than her, but already has strong ties to her family and is loyal to them. He proves to be a great support as she navigates the world of rulership.

June 1530: The death of Maximilian Sforza, Duke of Milan reignites Louis XIII's ambition to reclaim Milan, despite the fact that Charles V's loyalist troops occupy that area. He declares war against Charles and sends French troops over to reclaim the land. Empress Cecily, despite her young age, proves herself to be a very competent regent for Charles - she plans battlefield strategy, allocates money for supplies and recruits soldiers across the empire. The French are driven out of Milan, their army decimated. Charles is very impressed - none of his previous wives had displayed anything near that level of efficiency or success. However, he still refuses to satisfy her dream of "becoming a true wife", as she put it, by consummating their marriage. Although he does quit taking mistresses.

July 1530: The work of John Calvin, a Protestant theologian, circulates at the English court. Although he refuses to name the person who provided him the tutelage needed for this to happen, many suspect the queen. However, Henry IX staunchly defends his wife. Florence surrenders to Charles V.

August 1530: Princess Mary of Portugal gives birth to a daughter whom she wished to name Eleanor after the child's grandmother. This gesture does not please the queen, who orders Mary to rename the child. Therefore, the little infanta is named Katherine, after Mary's own mother. This incident causes a fight between Eleanor and her son, Alfonso, but Eleanor refuses to back down and criticized both her son and daughter-in-law for their "common, wanton lust". The relationships between the Portuguese royal family become very cold.

September 1530: A flood ravages Scotland, killing many people. England sends over aid and evacuates the royal family, but this only ignites the ire of the Scottish people who did not receive such evacuation. As their palace was washed away, John II and Margaret find themselves homeless and they seek shelter in England.

October 1530: Queen Eleanor of Portugal gives birth to a healthy son named Manuel. Queen Renee of England gives birth to a third daughter named after herself, a robust and hardy child who came into the world kicking and screaming. Though the king and queen are both still young and fertile, there are whispers floating around court that the queen will not bear a viable male heir due to her heresy. However, Henry IX does not complain about the lack of a male heir - he has many brothers and hopefully, he will one day have many nephews.

November 1530: Queen Margaret of Scotland gives birth to a daughter named after herself. This girl is betrothed to Philip, Duke of Savoy after the death of his previous betrothed. Thomas Wolsey dies after years of loyal service to the Tudor kings, and Henry IX organizes for him a grand funeral. Eleanor Brandon prematurely gives birth to a small baby, a son named after her father.

December 1530: Queen Elizabeth of France gives birth to another son, named Louis after his father. This boy is strong and healthy, but she fears his death after losing her previous child. After ensuring he is not ill, she then returns to France to reunite with her husband. Although her baby returns with her, alive and kicking, their ship had almost sunk multiple times due to terrible weather. Charles V is plunged into a state of depression by the death of his aunt, Margaret of Austria, who had served as an excellent regent of the Netherlands.
 
January 1530: Queen Eleanor of Portugal becomes pregnant again. She enters confinement early and prays day and night for the health of her unborn child. King John is less concerned, even as he still grieves for their lost children. Queen Renee of England also becomes pregnant again and she is very excited.

February 1530: Charles V proposes marriage to the young Princess Cecily of England. A flirtatious, openly sexual girl who resented her sister's glittering foreign marriage, she had been proving herself blatantly unsuitable for life at a convent and happily accepts the proposal. Henry IX offers Charles a large dowry for his sister (he is secretly very relieved to get her out of the convent where she had caused scandal after scandal), and Charles promises to not consummate the marriage until she reaches physical maturity - his vow of celibacy hasn't ended yet. Queen Margaret of Scotland becomes pregnant again. Charles V is crowned emperor in Bologna by Pope Clement VII.

March 1530: Cecily of England arrives at Bologna, where she is welcomed by her new husband. They marry quickly, both finding each other very attractive, but Charles refuses to sleep with her, much to her ire. But she is given a court of her own and he does listen to some of her advice, which satisfies some of her ambitions. Margaret Brandon, meanwhile, finds herself falling for Thomas Fitzroy - which the king and queen do not support. Thomas Fitzroy himself, meanwhile, finds himself very smitten with Katherine Parr, who had previously been the Duke of York's lover. A famous incident occurs where Margaret Brandon pulled out a chunk of Katherine Parr's hair in front of a horrified Queen Renee. Queen Elizabeth of France becomes pregnant.

April 1530: Queen Elizabeth of France finally makes her trip to England, where she reunites with some of her siblings. She then spends her pregnancy in England, instead of returning quickly like she had planned. Eleanor Brandon becomes pregnant.

May 1530: Dorothea I of Denmark marries Frederick II, Elector Palatine. He is much older than her, but already has strong ties to her family and is loyal to them. He proves to be a great support as she navigates the world of rulership.

June 1530: The death of Maximilian Sforza, Duke of Milan reignites Louis XIII's ambition to reclaim Milan, despite the fact that Charles V's loyalist troops occupy that area. He declares war against Charles and sends French troops over to reclaim the land. Empress Cecily, despite her young age, proves herself to be a very competent regent for Charles - she plans battlefield strategy, allocates money for supplies and recruits soldiers across the empire. The French are driven out of Milan, their army decimated. Charles is very impressed - none of his previous wives had displayed anything near that level of efficiency or success. However, he still refuses to satisfy her dream of "becoming a true wife", as she put it, by consummating their marriage. Although he does quit taking mistresses.

July 1530: The work of John Calvin, a Protestant theologian, circulates at the English court. Although he refuses to name the person who provided him the tutelage needed for this to happen, many suspect the queen. However, Henry IX staunchly defends his wife. Florence surrenders to Charles V.

August 1530: Princess Mary of Portugal gives birth to a daughter whom she wished to name Eleanor after the child's grandmother. This gesture does not please the queen, who orders Mary to rename the child. Therefore, the little infanta is named Katherine, after Mary's own mother. This incident causes a fight between Eleanor and her son, Alfonso, but Eleanor refuses to back down and criticized both her son and daughter-in-law for their "common, wanton lust". The relationships between the Portuguese royal family become very cold.

September 1530: A flood ravages Scotland, killing many people. England sends over aid and evacuates the royal family, but this only ignites the ire of the Scottish people who did not receive such evacuation. As their palace was washed away, John II and Margaret find themselves homeless and they seek shelter in England.

October 1530: Queen Eleanor of Portugal gives birth to a healthy son named Manuel. Queen Renee of England gives birth to a third daughter named after herself, a robust and hardy child who came into the world kicking and screaming. Though the king and queen are both still young and fertile, there are whispers floating around court that the queen will not bear a viable male heir due to her heresy. However, Henry IX does not complain about the lack of a male heir - he has many brothers and hopefully, he will one day have many nephews.

November 1530: Queen Margaret of Scotland gives birth to a daughter named after herself. This girl is betrothed to Philip, Duke of Savoy after the death of his previous betrothed. Thomas Wolsey dies after years of loyal service to the Tudor kings, and Henry IX organizes for him a grand funeral. Eleanor Brandon prematurely gives birth to a small baby, a son named after her father.

December 1530: Queen Elizabeth of France gives birth to another son, named Louis after his father. This boy is strong and healthy, but she fears his death after losing her previous child. After ensuring he is not ill, she then returns to France to reunite with her husband. Although her baby returns with her, alive and kicking, their ship had almost sunk multiple times due to terrible weather. Charles V is plunged into a state of depression by the death of his aunt, Margaret of Austria, who had served as an excellent regent of the Netherlands.
I don’t think the palace would be lost, it’s too far from the sea. Also royals have several palaces so they would never be homeless.
 
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