The Indrema Revolution [REVAMPED] - An Alternate History of Indrema, Pop Culture, and Gaming

Prologue
The Indrema Revolution [REVAMPED]
by KPyall (and other contributors)

y2E6HeZ.png


Welcome back to the Indrema Revolution! I wanted to try this again, but I'll try to avoid the pitfalls of the original story. The idea for this started officially in January 2022, and focuses on a company called Indrema, the gaming industry, and pop culture as a whole. Some things change, some things stay the same. If you aren't familiar with the story IOTL, lemme give you a give refresher. In the mid-1990s, a man named John Gildred had the idea for what would become Indrema, but the technology wasn't ready yet. In March 1999, after a Quake game, the idea had came up to him again: what if there was an open-source console that could let anyone be a developer?

Thus, Indrema was born. The company was officially founded in January 2000 and announced a new system, known as the L600/Indrema Entertainment System, that March. It was to be an ambitious system: it could play DVDs, CDs, and MP3s, it could browse the web, it could record TV, and it could play videos from the internet. Many people were on board. However, Indrema would shut down in April 2001 because capital couldn't be funded for the system. What if Indrema had survived and got successfully funded? Would they succeed? Stay tuned.

Let's set some ground rules:
  1. You can contribute! You can request to join the TIR conversation and I'll happy let you in if you're interested.​
  2. Be respectful to each other and any real person.​
  3. Don't get ahead. For example, being a year ahead of what the actual year we're on is.​
  4. I'll respond when I have the time, so don't get mad if I don't respond quickly. I might be doing something else.​
  5. Many of the events are obviously not actual events, and should NOT be interpreted as actual events in the story.
  6. And last but not least, enjoy the timeline!​

Contributors (more will be added if interested):
  1. @KPyall (me)
  2. @Otakuninja2006
  3. @someguywithpotato
  4. @Jaiken
  5. @Mr Red Stone
  6. @SubparLario
  7. @Nivek
  8. @ThatOneGuyWithSunglasses

[kpyall@indrema ~]$ sudo dnf install tir-thread
[sudo] password for kpyall
Last metadata expiration check: 0:40:34 ago on Tue 14 Nov 2023 06:37:40 PM CST.
Dependencies resolved.
================================================================================

Package Arch Version Repo Size
================================================================================
Installing:
tir-thread x86 2.0 indrema ?? M

Transaction Summary
================================================================================
Install 1 Package

Total download size: ?? M
Installed size: ?? M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
 
Last edited:
1999 - The Beginning of Indrema (POD)
1999
The Beginning of Indrema

Today, we have Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. Did you know there could have been a REAL fourth competitor to the market? This is the story of Indrema, which would be almost like OTL.

Although the concept of Indrema was conceived in the mid-1990s by a man named John Gildred (6, currently lost), it wouldn’t become a reality until March 1999(1) because of technological limitations.

One late night that March, Gildred played a game of Quake Capture the Flag with his friends(2). During that game, he had an ingenious idea; what if there was an open source console that allowed anyone to develop for it? Indrema then was founded shortly after, funded by friends, angel investors, Gildred’s savings account, and also his line of credit. (3) It had offices in Alameda, CA (4) and New York. (5) The console would be running the x86 architecture (at a time where most systems used custom chips) and use standard PC components. (Indrema is founded earlier than OTL; it was founded later in 1999 instead of officially being founded in 2000) Development for the console had already started.

At the time, the game industry was dominated by Nintendo, Sony, and Sega, with the N64, PS1, and Dreamcast (which had been released the year prior in Japan). Nintendo and Sony were developing the Dolphin and PS2 respectively, and because Microsoft feared that the latter would cannibalize sales of the Windows PC, they would create the “DirectX Box” to join the console market. Indrema would be new to the console market and be smaller than the others.

Meanwhile, the entertainment scene is just like OTL, with SpongeBob SquarePants becoming a juggernaut, and Family Guy, created by former Hanna-Barbera employee Seth MacFarlane, premieres on Fox as a slightly edgier Simpsons.​
 
Last edited:
1999
The Beginning of Indrema

Today, we have Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. Did you know there could have been a REAL fourth competitor to the market? This is the story of Indrema, which would be almost like OTL.

Although the concept of Indrema was conceived in the mid-1990s by a man named John Gildred (6, currently lost), it wouldn’t become a reality until March 1999(1) because of technological limitations.

One late night that March, Gildred played a game of Quake Capture the Flag with his friends(2). During that game, he had an ingenious idea; what if there was an open source console that allowed anyone to develop for it? Indrema then was founded shortly after, funded by friends, angel investors, Gildred’s savings account, and also his line of credit. (3) It had offices in Alameda, CA (4) and New York. (5) The console would be running the x86 architecture (at a time where most systems used custom chips) and use standard PC components. (Indrema is founded earlier than OTL; it was founded later in 1999 instead of officially being founded in 2000) Development for the console had already started.

At the time, the game industry was dominated by Nintendo, Sony, and Sega, with the N64, PS1, and Dreamcast (which had been released the year prior in Japan). Nintendo and Sony were developing the Dolphin and PS2 respectively, and because Microsoft feared that the latter would cannibalize sales of the Windows PC, they would create the “DirectX Box” to join the console market. Indrema would be new to the console market and be smaller than the others.​
Cool!
 
Sorry, I haven't posted on this for a few days, but I've got something that I'm gonna post soon.
It's Indrema entering the 21st century. That is all.
 
(TURKEY DAY UPDATE) 2000 - Indrema Powers On
2000
Indrema Powers On

hdtv-demo.jpg

The “HDTV technology demo box” (not a L600 prototype), 2000 (the first Indrema hardware ever produced IOTL and ITTL)

"Up to this point, software developers for game consoles had to marry to a proprietary platform where evolution is dictated by one company. Now, entertainment software vendors can embrace an open platform where the system software is freely distributed and the graphics subsystem is upgradable. Indrema will release a distribution of the Linux operating system specifically designed for TV and HDTV applications. We are working with the open source community to develop the missing pieces of the Linux platform to enable DVD-quality video support and next-generation 3D graphics performance. The days of the black box are over." - John Gildred (source, slightly modified)​

One year after their conception, Indrema announced their entry to the console market, known as the L600/Indrema Entertainment System. It was to be unlike anything before it: it ran on open source technology and had features most other consoles didn’t have at the time: a web browser, MP3 player, an email client, HDTV support, DVR functionality, and the ability to stream video over the Internet, which were rather ambitious at a time where most consoles could only play games and maybe CDs (or in the PS2’s case, DVDs). Indrema hoped to release it by the holiday season of that year.

Indrema would later reveal the potential specs of the system (2):
CPU600 MHz CPU (AMD or Intel)
RAM64 MB RAM
GPUnVidia GeForce GPU (upgradable)
Storage8/30/50 GB hard drive
MediaBuilt in DVD/CD player
OSDV LInux (modified Linux kernel)
VideoComposite, component, S-Video
AudioAnalog stereo, TOSLINK (optical audio)
Connectivity6 USB ports (4x front, 2x back)

The system’s reveal got a mixed reaction. Some were optimistic about the system, but others doubted it succeeding, because of Indrema’s lack of brand recognition and the conception that an American console wouldn’t be feasible anymore due to the failure of the Atari Jaguar. (the latter shared with the Xbox). Indrema started showcasing the IES at any opportunity they could, from TV to trade shows. However, they might not be attending E3 this year...

Indrema would partner with Loki Software, who ported Linux games to the PC (1), and Vicarious Visions, which had some experience with Linux, to form Indrema Studios, the company's in-house game development studio and distributor. Because of its open-source nature and to save time and money, Indrema decided to create a heavily modified version of the Quake engine called Fantasy to create three then-unknown launch titles for the system. They promised that the engine would be available and free to download when it became more sturdy.

In August, Indrema partnered up with another Linux juggernaut, Red Hat, to work on the software for the system, investing $6 million in the company. Their Linux distro, Red Hat Linux, served as the base of the console’s OS. (4)

By October, the PS2 (specs same as OTL) had been released into American stores (3), while the GameCube (nee Dolphin) and Xbox were revealed, the Dreamcast was on its last legs, and Indrema delayed the console’s release to Spring 2001. Meanwhile, Indrema had been partnering with companies like Metrowerks (who made development tools) and CollabNet (software management) to open the Indrema Developer Network, a website that featured information of the IES for developers.

By the end of the year, Indrema started a marketing campaign targeting potential developers, and wanted to start targeting consumers the next year:

('This could be you' is enclosed by a rectangle with a dashed light blue outline) "Why pay thousands of dollars to other console manufacturers to make games if you could do it for free? Meet the Indrema Entertainment System (working title). All you need is the SDK and Linux on a decent PC to start developing games today. Dream it, dare it, do it." - Indrema L600 Print Ad (2000)

Because Indrema was looking for funding to make the system a reality, Indrema branched out from private investors to large companies. One of these backers was Intel, who gave $14 million to the company. They would even partner to include an Intel CPU in the IES. [5]

Indrema was really shaping up to potentially become a serious fourth competitor, which was nearly unheard of at the time.

MISC.

[1] which never happened IOTL
[3] Indrema even mocked Sony, Microsoft, AND Nintendo in a David Letterman-style list!
[4] Similar to OTL, but Red Hat never funded Indrema.
[5] Indrema had been considering a AMD Duron processor IOTL. Yes, the Xbox may use an AMD CPU ITTL like it was originally going to IOTL while Indrema uses an Intel CPU.
 
Last edited:
Nice update buddy
Indrema had been considering a AMD Duron processor IOTL. Yes, the Xbox may use an AMD CPU ITTL like it was originally going to IOTL while Indrema uses an Intel CPU.
Yeah the switched it at the last second OTL
 
2000
Indrema Powers On

View attachment 871178
The “HDTV technology demo box” (not a L600 prototype), 2000 (the first Indrema hardware ever produced IOTL and ITTL)

"Up to this point, software developers for game consoles had to marry to a proprietary platform where evolution is dictated by one company. Now, entertainment software vendors can embrace an open platform where the system software is freely distributed and the graphics subsystem is upgradable. Indrema will release a distribution of the Linux operating system specifically designed for TV and HDTV applications. We are working with the open source community to develop the missing pieces of the Linux platform to enable DVD-quality video support and next-generation 3D graphics performance. The days of the black box are over." - John Gildred (source, slightly modified)​

One year after their conception, Indrema announced their entry to the console market, known as the L600/Indrema Entertainment System. It was to be unlike anything before it: it ran on open source technology and had features most other consoles didn’t have at the time: a web browser, MP3 player, an email client, HDTV support, DVR functionality, and the ability to stream video over the Internet, which were rather ambitious at a time where most consoles could only play games and maybe CDs (or in the PS2’s case, DVDs). Indrema hoped to release it by the holiday season of that year.

Indrema would later reveal the potential specs of the system (2):
CPU600 MHz CPU (AMD or Intel)
RAM64 MB RAM
GPUnVidia GeForce GPU (upgradable)
Storage8/30/50 GB hard drive
MediaBuilt in DVD/CD player
OSDV LInux (modified Linux kernel)
VideoComposite, component, S-Video
AudioAnalog stereo, TOSLINK (optical audio)
Connectivity6 USB ports (4x front, 2x back)

The system’s reveal got a mixed reaction. Some were optimistic about the system, but others doubted it succeeding, because of Indrema’s lack of brand recognition and the conception that an American console wouldn’t be feasible anymore due to the failure of the Atari Jaguar. (the latter shared with the Xbox). Indrema started showcasing the IES at any opportunity they could, from TV to trade shows. However, they might not be attending E3 this year...

Indrema would partner with Loki Software, who ported Linux games to the PC (1), and Vicarious Visions, which had some experience with Linux, to form Indrema Studios, the company's in-house game development studio and distributor. Because of its open-source nature and to save time and money, Indrema decided to create a heavily modified version of the Quake engine called Fantasy to create three then-unknown launch titles for the system. They promised that the engine would be available and free to download when it became more sturdy.

In August, Indrema partnered up with another Linux juggernaut, Red Hat, to work on the software for the system, investing $6 million in the company. Their Linux distro, Red Hat Linux, served as the base of the console’s OS. (4)

By October, the PS2 (specs same as OTL) had been released into American stores (3), while the GameCube (nee Dolphin) and Xbox were revealed, the Dreamcast was on its last legs, and Indrema delayed the console’s release to Spring 2001. Meanwhile, Indrema had been partnering with companies like Metrowerks (who made development tools) and CollabNet (software management) to open the Indrema Developer Network, a website that featured information of the IES for developers.

By the end of the year, Indrema started a marketing campaign targeting potential developers, and wanted to start targeting consumers the next year:

('This could be you' is enclosed by a rectangle with a dashed light blue outline) "Why pay thousands of dollars to other console manufacturers to make games if you could do it for free? Meet the Indrema Entertainment System (working title). All you need is the SDK and Linux on a decent PC to start developing games today. Dream it, dare it, do it." - Indrema L600 Print Ad (2000)

Because Indrema was looking for funding to make the system a reality, Indrema branched out from private investors to large companies. One of these backers was Intel, who gave $14 million to the company. They would even partner to include an Intel CPU in the IES. [5]

Indrema was really shaping up to potentially become a serious fourth competitor, which was nearly unheard of at the time.

[1] which never happened IOTL
[3] Indrema even mocked Sony, Microsoft, AND Nintendo in a David Letterman-style list!
[4] Similar to OTL, but Red Hat never funded Indrema.
[5] Indrema had been considering a AMD Duron processor IOTL. Yes, the Xbox may use an AMD CPU ITTL like it was originally going to IOTL while Indrema uses an Intel CPU.
This is a great update!
 
2000 Recap
2000 Pop Culture Recap (+ extras)

Similar to OTL, but here are a few differences:

Digimon and Pokémon switch places ITTL. Pokémon airs on Fox Kids, while Digimon airs on Kids’ WB! Due to the Pokémon anime’s success, Nintendo wanted to adapt their other franchises into shows.

It would begin as a pitch for a Mario anime. Although they were hesitant to have their mascot adapted, Nintendo agreed under the condition that they must be involved with the series’ production, in order to avoid the same mistakes of the live-action Mario movie. During development, it expanded to be an anthology of shorts based on Nintendo’s first-party and second-party franchises (mainly influenced by the then-new game Super Smash Bros.): Mario, Kirby, Pokémon, Zelda, Metroid, and Banjo-Kazooie, sandwiched by a framing device based on what Nintendo characters do after their game is over, with Mario acting as the cheerful Kermit the Frog-like host of the show (The Muppet Show was one of its biggest influences), trying to manage the chaos at Nintendo Studios with the cowardly Luigi, the cynical Link (although a bit less of a jerk than he was in the 80s DiC cartoon), and a variety of characters by Nintendo and its second party developers from Donkey Kong to Banjo and Kazooie. It would all be animated in CGI.


MISC. STUFF
Additional Note: Alongside Intel, venture capital firms (like this one, known as Sequoia Capital) would be interested in Indrema more than OTL.


Here’s the schedules for Fox Kids and Kids’ WB:

8:00: Action Man

8:30: Transformers: Beast Machines

9:00: Pokémon

9:30: Pokémon

10:00: X-Men: Evolution

10:30: Power Rangers

11:00: Spider-Man Unlimited (just imagine it lasts a bit longer)

11:30: Diabolik

The Vision of Escaflowne anime airs on Fox Family on a block competing with CN's Toonami ITTL.
8:00: The New Woody Woodpecker Show

8:30: Histeria!

9:00: Digimon: Digital Monsters

9:30: Dinozaurs

10:00: Static Shock

10:30: Batman Beyond

11:00: Men In Black: The Series

11:30: Max Steel
 
Last edited:
2001 (Part 1): Indrema Gets Serious
2001 (Part 1)
Indrema Gets Serious (it’s gonna be huge)

l600withtext.jpg


The IES’s plain Jane prototype design.​


In early 2001, Indrema publicly announced that they would directly partner with more companies to develop games for the system, along with some smaller studios and announced that the IES could be delayed soon. Indrema hadn’t spoken much after, leading some outsiders to assume it would be vaporware. In reality, they were still alive and currently working on the IES.

By March, Indrema had decided on the processor for the system; a 766 MHz Intel Celeron-based CPU (a bit faster than TTL Xbox’s Athlon/Duron-based 750 MHz (as Bill Gates never signed the deal with Intel because of Indrema’s involvement)). Because nVidia had rejected Indrema’s offer because they were already with Microsoft, Indrema would partner with its rival, ATI, to make a GPU based on the then-upcoming R200 chip. Because ATI’s chips weren’t available at the time, and their then-current offerings were inferior to what nVidia (and the IES) would have, developers had to resort to GeForce2 GPU to approximate how the graphics would look on LSeries. Because of more interested investors supporting the company, Indrema doesn't shut down in April 2001.

They also announced that they would attend that year’s E3. Because it was the biggest event in the gaming industry, Indrema had to plan ahead and have some consoles ready by then.

Indrema @ E3 2001

Indrema_Console.png

The finalized LSeries' design, with a controller. Talk about a glow-up. (a custom InterAct AxisPad gamepad, presumably a placeholder until an actual Indrema-made controller was designed)

During E3, Indrema announced the IES’ formerly unknown exclusives (2) with trailers and some gameplay.
  1. The Book of Aeri (by me) - An ordinary teenage boy named Joe Anderson and his younger brother, Anthony, find themselves in an unknown world when the universe is under attack by an eldritch abomination dubbed “The Unknown”. The siblings, Aeri (the queen), Bolt-O (a cynical rustbucket) and Reebo (a newer spherical and optimistic robot) traverse through different strange worlds to defeat The Unknown and get back home.
  2. Astro the Armadillo (idea by me, name by Otakuninja2006) - Dr. Kai Ote wants to turn the futuristic world of Techas into his own playground. Astro, an hard working armadillo sheriff, hears about this, it’s up to him to save Techas before it’s too late! (1)
  3. Railpunchers (by Otakuninja2006) A game - A Tony Hawk-like skateboarding/graffiti game with a bright and colorful art style, challenges, and did we mention graffiti? Tons of graffiti. (copy and pasted from the old thread because it’s so good)
They also revealed some other launch titles (3) such as Shogo: Mobile Armor Division, Tux Racer, Soulride, SimCity 3000, and Nanosaur (mostly existing PC games). After that, they announced that Sega, Namco, iD Software (of Doom and Quake fame), and Epic Games (known for Unreal Tournament) would support the IES, along with Interplay, Infogrames, Activision, Electronic Arts and Gathering of Developers (5)

Indrema saved the best for last as Gildred revealed the biggest reveal of Indrema’s presentation:

They revealed the system's final name, Indrema LSeries, accompanied by the system’s boot animation. It even got a more sleek and futuristic design, forgoing the tray-loading drive with a slot-loading one and added gill-like ventilation to the system. Indrema would announce that it had to scrap some features of the system because they figured out that it would be too ambitious for the time and would be a little costly. The "GPU Slide Bay" feature was replaced with an integrated GPU not unlike its rivals, the DVR functionality was removed, but it could still play CDs and DVDs and burn music to the hard drive, similar to the Xbox and PS2. However, Indrema would keep the internet functionality, mainly for online play. Indrema would not have its own online gaming service, but left it up to developers to maintain their online servers. An advanced controller with a microphone and 3D sound was also scrapped for that same reason.

Here’s a comparison between the four major consoles:
Components
Indrema LSeries
Microsoft Xbox
Sony PlayStation 2 (same as OTL)
Nintendo GameCube (same as OTL)
CPUCustom Intel Celeron ("Coppermine" based) @ 766 MHzCustom AMD Athlon/Duron (“Thunderbird” based) @ 750 MHzSony Emotion Engine @ ~294.91 MHzPowerPC “Gekko” @ 486 MHz
RAM128MB DDR SDRAM (64 core + 64 local, mainly for graphics)64 MB DDR RAM32 MB RDRAM43 MB total
GPUCustom ATI R200 GPU (Radeon 8500 based)nVidia NV2A (GeForce3 based, same as OTL)Sony Graphics SynthesizerATI/ArtX “Flipper”
MediaDVD (5), CDDVD, CDDVD, CDCustom disc based on miniDVD
Storage10 GB IDE hard drive8/10 GB IDE hard drive, 8MB memory cards8MB memory cards (larger sizes are third party)512KB-8MB memory cards
OS/System SoftwareDV Linux (modified Red Hat Linux)Windows 2000-basedN/AInitial Program Loader
VideoComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART (via proprietary connector)Composite, component, S-Video, RGB SCARTComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART, VGAComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART
AudioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo
Input6 USB ports (4x front (1.1), 2x back (2.0))4x Xbox controller ports2x PS controller ports, 2x USB 1.14x controller ports, 2x serial ports, 1x parallel port
ConnectivityFast Ethernet/LAN, modem (optional)Fast Ethernet/LANN/A at launch, i.Link (aka FireWire)Modem/Ethernet/LAN


Indrema would share another announcement: the LSeries would be released in North America in Q1 2002. Indrema chose a later release date to polish the system up and to avoid getting overshadowed by the launch of the Xbox and GameCube. After the presentation, Indrema let attendees play early demos of the launch games, including the three exclusives.

They would also make more announcements in the coming months. Overall, besides Indrema's involvement, E3 2001 would be mostly like OTL's.


ADDITIONAL STUFF:

[1]: Inspired by a thread on the official Indrema mailing list
[2]: exclusive to TTL
[3]: Mostly from what the launch titles the IES would've had IOTL
[4]: The L600 IOTL would use DVD-9 discs, which are 8.5 GB in size. Some sources erroneously state that it would have 10GB DVDs, which don’t exist. This error originates from Howstuffworks.com, in which the writer mistook the capacity of the hard drive with the size of the DVD, which other sources took for granted.
[5]: Sourced from what companies were rumored to develop for the IES IOTL

I considered using a 733 MHz Celeron, the same speed as the OTL Xbox, but changed it with something slightly faster than TTL's Xbox.
 
Last edited:
2001 (Part 1)
Indrema Gets Serious (it’s gonna be huge)

View attachment 871612

The IES’s plain Jane prototype design.​


In early 2001, Indrema publicly announced that they would directly partner with more companies to develop games for the system, along with some smaller studios and announced that the IES could be delayed soon. Indrema hadn’t spoken much after, leading some outsiders to assume it would be vaporware. In reality, they were still alive and currently working on the IES.

By March, Indrema had decided on the processor for the system; a 766 MHz Intel Celeron-based CPU (a bit faster than TTL Xbox’s Athlon/Duron-based 750 MHz (as Bill Gates never signed the deal with Intel because of Indrema’s involvement)). Because nVidia had rejected Indrema’s offer because they were already with Microsoft, Indrema would partner with its rival, ATI, to make a GPU based on the then-upcoming R200 chip. Because ATI’s chips weren’t available at the time, and their then-current offerings were inferior to what nVidia (and the IES) would have, developers had to resort to GeForce2 GPU to approximate how the graphics would look on LSeries. Because of more interested investors supporting the company, Indrema doesn't shut down in April 2001.

They also announced that they would attend that year’s E3. Because it was the biggest event in the gaming industry, Indrema had to plan ahead and have some consoles ready by then.

Indrema @ E3 2001

View attachment 871615

The finalized LSeries' design, with a controller. Talk about a glow-up. (a custom InterAct AxisPad gamepad, presumably a placeholder until an actual Indrema-made controller was designed)

During E3, Indrema announced the IES’ formerly unknown exclusives (2) with trailers and some gameplay.
  1. The Book of Aeri (by me) - An ordinary teenage boy named Joe Anderson and his younger brother, Anthony, find themselves in an unknown world when the universe is under attack by an eldritch abomination dubbed “The Unknown”. The siblings, Aeri (the queen), Bolt-O (a cynical rustbucket) and Reebo (a newer spherical and optimistic robot) traverse through different strange worlds to defeat The Unknown and get back home.
  2. Astro the Armadillo (idea by me, name by Otakuninja2006) - Dr. Kai Ote wants to turn the futuristic world of Techas into his own playground. Astro, an hard working armadillo sheriff, hears about this, it’s up to him to save Techas before it’s too late! (1)
  3. Railpunchers (by Otakuninja2006) A game - A Tony Hawk-like skateboarding/graffiti game with a bright and colorful art style, challenges, and did we mention graffiti? Tons of graffiti. (copy and pasted from the old thread because it’s so good)
They also revealed some other launch titles (3) such as Shogo: Mobile Armor Division, Tux Racer, Soulride, SimCity 3000, and Nanosaur (mostly existing PC games). After that, they announced that Sega, Namco, iD Software (of Doom and Quake fame), and Epic Games (known for Unreal Tournament) would support the IES.

Indrema saved the best for last as Gildred revealed the biggest reveal of Indrema’s presentation:

They revealed the system's final name, Indrema LSeries, accompanied by the system’s boot animation. It even got a more sleek and futuristic design, forgoing the tray-loading drive with a slot-loading one and added gill-like ventilation to the system. Indrema would announce that it had to scrap some features of the system because they figured out that it would be too ambitious for the time and would be a little costly. The "GPU Slide Bay" feature was replaced with an integrated GPU not unlike its rivals, the DVR functionality was removed, but it could still play CDs and DVDs and burn music to the hard drive, similar to the Xbox and PS2. However, Indrema would keep the internet functionality, mainly for online play. Indrema would not have its own online gaming service, but left it up to developers to maintain their online servers. An advanced controller with a microphone and 3D sound was also scrapped for that same reason.

Here’s a comparison between the four major consoles:
Components
Indrema LSeries
Microsoft Xbox
Sony PlayStation 2 (same as OTL)
Nintendo GameCube (same as OTL)
CPUCustom Intel Celeron ("Coppermine" based) @ 766 MHzCustom AMD Athlon/Duron (“Thunderbird” based) @ 750 MHzSony Emotion Engine @ ~294.91 MHzPowerPC “Gekko” @ 486 MHz
RAM128MB DDR SDRAM (64 core + 64 local, mainly for graphics)64 MB DDR RAM32 MB RDRAM43 MB total
GPUCustom ATI R200 GPU (Radeon 8500 based)nVidia NV2A (GeForce3 based, same as OTL)Sony Graphics SynthesizerATI/ArtX “Flipper”
MediaDVD (5), CDDVD, CDDVD, CDCustom disc based on miniDVD
Storage10 GB IDE hard drive8/10 GB IDE hard drive, 8MB memory cards8MB memory cards (larger sizes are third party)512KB-8MB memory cards
OS/System SoftwareDV Linux (modified Red Hat Linux)Windows 2000-basedN/AInitial Program Loader
VideoComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART (via proprietary connector)Composite, component, S-Video, RGB SCARTComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART, VGAComposite, component, S-Video, RGB SCART
AudioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo, optical audioAnalog stereo
Input6 USB ports (4x front (1.1), 2x back (2.0))4x Xbox controller ports2x PS controller ports, 2x USB 1.14x controller ports, 2x serial ports, 1x parallel port
ConnectivityFast Ethernet/LAN, modem (optional)Fast Ethernet/LANN/A at launch, i.Link (aka FireWire)Modem/Ethernet/LAN


Indrema would share another announcement: the LSeries would be released to test markets in San Francisco, LA, and New York in Q1 2002, while the rest of North America would get it later that year. Indrema chose a later release date to polish the system up and to avoid getting overshadowed by the launch of the Xbox and GameCube. After the presentation, Indrema let attendees play early demos of the launch games, including the three exclusives.

They would also make more announcements in the coming months. Overall, besides Indrema's involvement, E3 2001 would be mostly like OTL's.


ADDITIONAL STUFF:

[1]: Inspired by a thread on the official Indrema mailing list
[2]: exclusive to TTL
[3]: Mostly from what the launch titles the IES would've had IOTL
[4]: The L600 IOTL would use DVD-9 discs, which are 8.5 GB in size. Some sources erroneously state that it would have 10GB DVDs, which don’t exist. This error originates from Howstuffworks.com, in which the writer mistook the capacity of the hard drive with the size of the DVD, which other sources took for granted.

I considered using a 733 MHz Celeron, the same speed as the OTL Xbox, but changed it with something slightly faster than TTL's Xbox.
Nice update! I even like the boot animation, commented on it and subscribed.
 
I’ve got something that I hope I’ll post by the end of the week, so stay tuned.
Probably Indrema’s biggest break since E3; hyping consumers for the LSeries as a serious ”fourth console” besides Xbox, PS2, and GCN. Will Indrema win the crowd?
 
2001 (Part 2): Think Outside the Box
2001 (Part 2)
Think Outside the Box (posted this earlier but it was deleted, and I'm reposting this to be better)
AUGUST 14, 2001

Not just a dream anymore!

Mark your calendars, because the Indrema LSeries is heading to stores @ 12:00 AM EST on 2/22/02, in-store or online!

It’s the next step in home entertainment. The Indrema LSeries is the most powerful system of its class. The main stars of the show are its 32-bit Intel “Coppermine” processor @ 766 MHz, 128 MB of total memory, and its next-gen ATI® graphics processor, giving you stunning, realistic graphics. Not only can it play games, but you can also download games onto its 10 GB hard drive. It’s also a powerful DVD/CD player (no dongle needed!) and an internet-ready machine, whether it’s playing online with your friends or even if you’re just browsing the web via the built-in web browser.

Be sure to look for updates in the coming months! We’ll be promoting Indrema LSeries in magazines, TV, in stores, and online. Be sure to check out our new site, www.IndremaLSeries.com, for the coolest new updates on the Indrema LSeries! Don't forget, you'll soon be able to pre-order the system at your favorite store for only $299.00 MSRP!

About Indrema:
Indrema, founded in 1999, is on a mission to change the video game industry as we know it by making Linux gaming accessible to everyone and allow developers of any size to make games. A blend of private investing firms and companies such as Intel®, Red Hat®, and ATI® help fund Indrema.

- LSeries press release


Indrema went all out on the promotion of the LSeries. With a $75 million marketing budget, the company would ensure that Indrema became the “hip and sleek” alternative to Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. Although it had a smaller advertising budget compared to its much bigger rivals, Indrema unveiled their marketing campaign, “Think Outside the Box”, a not-so-subtle jab at Microsoft’s Xbox and the fact that LSeries could do a bit more than what its rivals had.

The name “LSeries” and its redesign was mainly a result of making the console more appealing to consumers, while it was referred to as the “Indrema LSeries” as the company was unsure if LSeries by itself could be trademarked. Although Indrema’s first three in-house launch titles showed different capabilities of the system, The Book of Aeri was the game that pushed the LSeries’ limits. Working with an established game developer (Vicarious Visions) gave the games the polish they needed. Aeri along with Astro the Armadillo, became one of Indrema's flagship titles.

Near the release of the LSeries, the skepticism of the LSeries died down a bit as people were mesmerized by the launch games that Indrema was announcing, including exclusives, games that were releasing for other systems as well, and PC games that hadn’t been released on consoles.

As Indrema was gearing up for the LSeries, the Nintendo GameCube and Xbox would release on the same dates as OTL. Behind the scenes, Indrema had set the specs of the LSeries in stone. They’d already had some money for finding a partner to mass-produce the LSeries, but who? After considering many different companies that could bring the system to life, they decided on Sanmina, an OEM manufacturer that could help Indrema bring the system to market.

They agreed to manufacture the LSeries along with the aforementioned Intel (CPU) and ATI (GPU), with new partnerships such as Maxtor (supplying the 10GB 7200RPM hard drives, planning to have larger hard drives later), InterAct (known for the GameShark, manufactured the controller for the system), and Samsung (who supplied RAM, optical drives [2], hard drives for the system), while buying a stake in Indrema. Although it would be sold at a loss like other systems, Indrema would make up for it with game sales and accessory sales. The LSeries officially started production in November.

Although somewhat squashed by the Xbox and GameCube's release, the LSeries spread through word-of-mouth as more people became aware of the console in addition to Indrema itself through the internet, television, or in print. To give potential LSeries buyers a feel of what it could do, Indrema installed kiosks in stores such as Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Circuit City and Toys "R" Us that let gamers play the LSeries before it got released, and pre-orders started for the system in-store and online. But there was another group who wanted the LSeries; hackers. Unlike its competitors, Indrema encouraged hacking its systems and let them tinker, but drew the line against piracy.

In addition, Indrema officially revealed the UI of the system, known as the Launchpad, that ran over the Linux kernel.

Made in Adobe Illustrator, Blender, and edited with Paint.NET

A mockup of the Launchpad's default theme. (pretend it's rendered in 3D) [1]

Indrema had successfully attracted developers, big and small, and consumers alike. It combined the PC-like architecture of the Xbox, the built-in multimedia functionality of the PS2, and the quirky design of the GameCube. It was dubbed "The FrankenConsole".



MISC:

[1] Inspired by the IDN website ITTL and IOTL.
[2] Other manufacturers of the LSeries' optical drives included Phillips, Pioneer, and Hitachi.

2001 Recap: A recap on how popular culture is ITTL, and also the sixth generation line-up. On an unrelated note, the economy will be better than it was IOTL.
2002: Indrema's LSeries releases, and a certain company might be interested in it... but who is it? I don't know. However, they can distribute the LSeries outside of North America.
 
Last edited:
2001 Recap
2001 Recap
(somewhat inspired by @Otakuninja2006)

While the dot-com recession happens like OTL, Indrema gets successfully funded and gets developers on board for the LSeries. Another factor is 9/11 being completely butterflied out, resulting in the world being a little more optimistic than ITTL.

Indrema’s LSeries website launches, including information about the system, forums, news, and a countdown to the release of the system.

Meanwhile, Sega discontinues the Dreamcast and Sega leaves the industry, the Xbox and GameCube release. While the GameCube is the same as OTL, the Xbox has an AMD processor instead of the Intel processor, while Sony’s PlayStation 2 is still dominating the industry.

Viacom partners with Microsoft to make exclusives based on its franchises for the Xbox, while Fox Family (which survives ITTL) picks up the American broadcasting rights to Mario’s World, set for release in 2002, while Nintendo announces plans to buy out Rare, expected to complete in that same year.

Nickelodeon doesn’t reject Nicktoons like Constant Payne while SpongeBob and The Fairly OddParents! becomes the network's most popular shows just like OTL, and Cartoon Network launches its adult block, Adult Swim while Hanna-Barbera survives. Not much is known about Disney Channel’s future though…

Other than that, 2001 feels more like an extension of 2000 ITTL because of the butterflies.

2002: The Indrema LSeries launches, but will it make waves? Find out! (this might be in separate parts)
This will be all about the launch of Indrema's first product; the system, the launch titles, and the Indrema experience.
 
2002: The Dawn of a Revolution: The Launch of the LSeries (Part 1)
2002
The Dawn of a Revolution: The Launch of the LSeries (Part 1)

Logo
LSeries Black New.png
CodenamesIndrema Entertainment System, L600
Full NameIndrema LSeries Entertainment System
CPUCustom Intel Celeron @ 800 MHz
RAM64MB DDR SDRAM, with an additional 64MB for the GPU
GPUCustom ATI R200 GPU (Radeon 8500 based, on par with the GeForce3) @ 275 MHz
MediaDVD, CD, digital distribution
Storage10 GB IDE hard drive (with plans for larger storage later)
Operating SystemDV Linux (modified Linux kernel)
VideoComposite, component, S-Video, via the LSeries’ proprietary AV cord, “Indrema AV”, VGA, HDMI
AudioAnalog stereo, optical audio (TOSLINK)
Input6 USB ports (4x front, 2x back)
ConnectivityFast Ethernet/LAN, 56k USB modem (sold separately)
Release DateUS: February 22nd, 2002
Initial Price$299.99

Final final specs at launch (for reals this time)


“The day before its launch at 6 PM, I left my job at Taco Bell early and started camping out at Best Buy with like 25 other people (and more during midnight) to wait for the LSeries. There was a couple that gave all of us free food so we wouldn’t starve. When Best Buy opened its doors, I got my LSeries.” - YouTube comment from “LSeries launch day (February 21-22, 2002)” by Vampire Robot (exists IOTL)

In December the year prior, Indrema started partnering with the rental giant, Blockbuster, in a promotion that allowed gamers to rent the LSeries before its official release (3). These systems came with a DVD-ROM with demos of LSeries games. Indrema promoted the LSeries heavily on TV, print, and on the internet, with advertisements stating the slogan “2/22 4 $299 (99!)” (1), with The Book of Aeri, Astro the Armadillo, and Railpunchers headlining the advertisements for the system. The backlash had died down more as the hype grew.

By February 21st, the day before the LSeries officially launched in North America, many people camped out at stores such as Best Buy and Wal-Mart as the first public LSeries units were shipped Indrema expected to ship out 75,000-100,000 units during launch week. Many retail chains threw launch parties, with some providing food, while the system was being officially launched at midnight. When stores opened, people got the system they’d been waiting for almost two years. Despite all the troubles Indrema had while bringing the system to market, the LSeries launched, being the most powerful system at the time in theory, as it one-upped the Xbox's 750 MHz processor ITTL and its nVidia GPU (same IOTL and ITTL) and mostly positive reviews. The LSeries would be shipped into stores across North America throughout the year.

By the time the LSeries released, InterAct’s controller, known as the “LPad”, had changed significantly, with it being a hybrid between their AxisPad and Hammerhead controllers, with 4 face buttons and “start” and “select” buttons, rumble (powered by the LSeries), a D-pad, two analog sticks, in a layout not unlike the DualShock, while the chrome casing on the prototype was replaced with with a matte silver with textured rubber grips for better handling. As a last minute decision, Indrema swapped the 766MHz Celeron with a faster 800MHz one.

The system included:
  • The LSeries itself
  • 1 LPad (controller)
  • Indrema AV to composite
  • Power plug
  • The Book of Aeri
  • …and of course, a manual and some other documentation.
Its user interface, the Launchpad, which was designed by MANEX [2], who made the SFX for The Matrix, was shown if a disc was not inserted or if the user exited the application. It could be controlled by the LPad, the LBaton (remote control), or a USB keyboard and mouse. It had these apps built in:
  • Indrema Game Channel: where one could download some LSeries games, including indie titles, from the Internet
  • Indrema Music Channel: allowed playback of audio files, which also could be burned onto the LSeries’ hard drive
  • Indrema Web Channel: a Mozilla-based (not Firefox) browser functioning like a PC's browser, complete with add-ons such as Flash and the ability to download
  • Indrema Cinema: launched when a video disc was inserted, also supported progressive scan DVD playback
  • Indrema Photo Channel: allowed photos to be viewed on the LSeries
The Launchpad could be customized with skins, from original skins to skins that imitated the UIs of the other consoles.

The LSeries could play CDs, Video CDs, and DVDs. LSeries games were distributed digitally, on DVD-ROM, and on CD-ROM.

Consumers praised the LSeries’ sleek design, widely known as “a product ahead of its time”, the Launchpad user interface, its multimedia functionality, and its online connectivity. The concept of browsing the web on a console had been attempted by Sega and InterAct, but Indrema’s browser was based on the same technology as Netscape’s and allowed access to the full internet like a PC did, complete with Macromedia Flash support. However, it was criticized for its heaviness (thank to its use of PC components, shared by the Xbox) and some of the earliest units had failure-prone DVD drives. Because of that, Sanmina and Indrema repaired the drives with improved ones for free. Regardless, the slot loading drive was one of the LSeries’ innovative features although it couldn’t read irregularly shaped discs or mini discs. It was capable of rendering and playback up to 1080i (with a Indrema AV to component cable).

The game bundled with the system, The Book of Aeri, proved that the LSeries could be a success and was praised for both the gameplay and the visuals, while the story was an interesting twist on the isekai formula. Its other flagships, Astro the Armadillo was a fun platformer not unlike Crash Bandicoot, and Railpunchers gave Indrema the attitude that could fill in Sega’s shoes.

The LSeries was attracting more than just consumers. Not too long after the launch, not unlike the Xbox, hackers started modding the system, leading to a community that made their own software/hardware for the LSeries, finding new ways to install unofficial Launchpads, exploits, and even tricking the LSeries to load pirated games by modifying the optical drive’s firmware to bypass the security check. Indrema was not fond of the hackers pirating their games and filed cease-and-desists to remove websites that encouraged Indrema game piracy. However, Indrema embraced the hacking community, unlike the other manufacturers, as long they weren't pirating their games. As the system was not officially released outside of North America yet, people outside of the continent imported the LSeries.

The LSeries was a moderate success with general consumers and Linux geeks alike, selling 96,300 systems during launch week. It would inspire a boom in the Linux gaming industry as more developers, indie or not, flocked to the LSeries as a gateway to make Linux gaming as big as gaming on Windows and console gaming. Indrema officially became a fourth competitor, as companies welcomed Indrema to the gaming industry. One of those companies was a company famous for Half-Life and its inability to count to three. That's right, Valve, who was invested in Linux gaming earlier ITTL, supported the LSeries with ports of its titles.

But other games are on the LSeries at launch? Stay tuned! (psst… if you want to suggest launch titles for the LSeries, original or not, write ‘em down in the conversation! [or maybe a thread?])



[1] - pronounced as “two twenty two for two ninety nine (ninety nine!)”
[2] - wanted to make the IES’s UI IOTL, too IIRC
[3] - inspired by a similar promotion with Sega and Hollywood Video
 
Last edited:
Top