After the revolt, the revolutionaries issued a Declaration of Independence with Burma as a republic. The celebrations were short-lived, however, as the various ethnic minorities who were under British protection revolted against the new government, particularly the Karen people.
Now there's a picture I didn't need ;) .
 
@JorizCastillo you seem to have wrongly threadmarked the last chapter. I reckon it is supposed to be Asia instead of Africa. Good chapter, btw!
 
I've read all of this TL over the last ~3 days or so and really quite enjoyed it. It's easy enough to follow and the updates are a good length to keep readers interested.

My only queries are to how Baja got statehood so fast given its low population? And how come, given what happened to the British, nobody marched into French Guyana or some of the French West African coast when France fell to revolution?

Northstar
 
Not just the low population - being the 40s, half of Congress should be absolutely terrified of making "those people" a state. Hawaii in '59 was already like pulling teeth.
 
My only queries are to how Baja got statehood so fast given its low population?

Not just the low population - being the 40s, half of Congress should be absolutely terrified of making "those people" a state. Hawaii in '59 was already like pulling teeth.
Baja got statehood early because it's part of the contiguous USA. It's low population also allows US settlers to move into the area.
 
Before the Storm - Europe
Before the Storm – Europe
Germany
During the chancellorship of von Papen, the German military modified its defensive fortifications on its border with France. Known as the Ludendorff Line, it stretched from the Swiss border, through Alsace Lorraine and Luxembourg all the way to the Meuse River. Consisting of bunkers, pillboxes, obstacles, tunnels, and tank traps, the Ludendorff line was designed to slow down a hypothetical French invasion for the army to mobilize. There had been plans to extend the fortifications beyond the Meuse but were scrapped due to budget costs although construction had begun on building fortifications along the Rhine.

MQned.jpg

A bunker along the Ludendorff Line, 1940

Italy
In 1940, Italy was at the top of her game. Under Mussolini, the country acquired new territory and became a respected regional power. Though it lost the war in Spain, it learned some valuable lessons from its volunteers sent there. Having lost 2 wars previously in 1896 and 1918, il Duce knew that his military needed a complete rehaul. By 1940, the army reforms were still underway although changes have been made.

Danubian Federation
As the continuation of the Hapsburg Empire in all but name, the federation continued in its drive of establishing a union of equals for all the ethnicities within it. Separate states were created according to ethnic boundaries while the federal government in Vienna maintained control over national affairs. Despite its lofty goals, the states became a blueprint for nationalist groups in their attempt to take power while being hampered by the security services.

Romania
Ever since its defeat in the Great War, Romania was a country in chaos. Widespread revanchism and anger at the failure of the government to achieve the national dream, combined with an economic slump due to the failed war effort coupled with failing cereal prices and a worsening rural situation led to a widespread feeling of ennui combined with anger, eventually leading to a meteoric rise in support for previously-fringe ultranationalist parties and movements. Initially, the first among these seemed to be the LANC (National-Christian Defense League), but a defector, the young and charismatic Corneliu Zelea Codreanu, started to gain more and more adepts, managing to more efficiently channel the desire for union and vengeance towards a greater desire for national rebirth, embodied within his movement: The Legion of the Archangel Michael, also known popularly as the Legionary Movement.

The Legion’s popularity steadily rose over the years until King Carol II was eventually forced to appoint Codreanu as the new PM. Once the Legion was in power, they began enacting their policies which included anti-Semitic and anti-Hungarian laws designed to force them out of the country.

Corneliu_Zelea_Codreanu.jpg

Corneliu Codreanu, Căpitanul of Romania

Greece
Having been humiliated in the war, Greece lost blood, land, and treasure from the Central Powers. Venizelos was forced out and the deposed king restored to the throne. Aside from the territorial loss, Austria and Germany both put high war debts upon Greece. King Alexander would try to negotiate these debts by allowing German and Austrian companies to unrestrained access to the Greek economy. When this only made things worse, he fled the country as the Second Hellenic Republic was declared.

Alas, this new government was not to be, as years of failed governments and endless successions of coups plagued the nation. This would continue until General Georgios Kondylis would seize control of the country and declare himself the regent of Greece in 1926. He intended his regency to be permanent, as both former King Alexander and Prince George (King Constantine had died in exile in 1923) were still exiled. Kondylis would be overthrown and executed in 1931, and the Third Hellenic Republic was declared. The first elections of the new republic would see the center-left New Liberal Union as the most dominant political party in the coalition government under the new Prime Minister Georgios Papandreou.

This government would soon be short-lived as it was forced to hand over the island of Corfu and the Ionian islands to Italy. For the next few days, riots broke out in Athens over this humiliation. This undoubtedly fueled the rise of nationalist movements that had the potential of overthrowing the government.

Serbia
Having been blamed for starting the Great War, the Serbs suffered the most under the Austrian yoke. The Obrenovic dynasty was brought back to power with Mirko Dimitri Petrovic-Njegos becoming Mirko I of Serbia. Compared to 1914, Serbia had shrunken considerably and Austrian troops occupied the country. That changed with the Great Depression as they were forced to pull their troops back home.

Throughout the years of Mirko and the regency of Mihailo I, Serbia was an unstable country under an authoritarian and autocratic regime. In time, nationalist and communist groups were gaining traction and would regularly challenge the government. One of the biggest groups were the Chetniks, a nationalist organization that had been called a terrorist group by the government.
 
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maybe threadmark this information so people don't keep badgering on about a new update? or write it in the title?

I don't think that this helps. Best would be add hiatus text to headline of this thread. And I am not sure if even that helps. Some people just can't think when they begin ask questions.
 
A Small Victory
A Small Victory
The New Republic
Having been forced to cede Corfu to the Italians, most of the Greek people had had enough of the humiliation. Many of the opposition parties placed the blame on King George II for having, furthering republican sentiments even further. 2 years later, a group of republican officers conducts a military coup, overthrowing the government. A nationwide referendum was then held in which the majority of people voted for a republic, ending the monarchy. Several monarchist officers who opposed the coup were subsequently purged while the royal family was forced into exile.

1200px-Demonstration_for_the_declaration_of_the_Greek_Republic_-_1924.jpg

A public demonstration supporting the Republic and the generals that conducted the coup, 1933

The euphoria of a new government soon faded, however, as the political parties both left and right bickered on about what a constitution would look like. While the mainstream parties struggle to govern the country, the political extremes on both sides wait for a moment where they could take power. The Communists under Zachariadis and the royalists/fascists under Metaxas both bide their time until a situation arises.

The Albanian Crisis
In 1939, a resurgent Italy had once again laid its eyes on the small nation of Albania. Despite being under Austrian influence, Italian influence was slowly growing to a point that worried Vienna. Mussolini had always had an eye on Albania over the years, having not been satisfied with his conquest in Abyssinia. With the transfer of Corfu into Italian hands, the Duce felt confident enough to send an ultimatum to the Albanian King. In that letter, Italy demanded that he surrender his country to the Italians or risk an invasion.

When the Danubians got word of this, they sent its Adriatic fleet into Durres in a show of force against the Italians who also had their fleet nearby. Vienna also warned Mussolini to back away from Albania as they were utterly against anyone controlling the Otranto Strait.

Things nearly came to a blow until Germany was forced to settle the issue. Unsurprisingly, Berlin advised the Italians to back away as they needed to both nations on their side in the coming war. Even Victor Emmanuel and Ciano advised Mussolini to stand down. Left with no choice, the Duce backed down from his threat but would vow revenge in the future.

The Balkan Gobbler
With nearly all the lands that it had coveted, Bulgaria relished in its very own place in the sun. Its position as the Prussia of the Balkans makes the country a rising regional power. However, its new areas are filled with groups that wouldn’t be considered Bulgarian in any way. Thus, the government continued its Bulgarisation policies which met resistance by the local Serb, Romanian, Greek, and Turk minorities. This strained with all of its neighbors especially the Ottomans, while the Austrians were becoming worried that the Bulgarians might soon in the future be the new center of pan-Slavic agitation.

By the start of the 40s, Bulgaria stands unopposed with a robust military all the while striving to be neutral in European affairs but domineering in Balkan affairs. Despite being pro-German in its outlook, the Bulgarian leadership would prefer staying out of another European war.

***
Paris
In the rooms of the French High Command, the final touches have been made for an invasion plan that would take the Germans by surprise. After a full-scale review of the plan by the generals, the plan is sent to Commune Chairman for approval. After much scrutiny, the plan is given a seal of approval and the mobilization could now begin in earnest. It was time to take revenge against the Bosch.
 
For the Communists, the best option would be for the French and British to bog the Germans down in a war of attrition for enough time to divert enough forces to the west, allowing Stalin to unleash a reverse Barbarossa from the west
 
For the Communists, the best option would be for the French and British to bog the Germans down in a war of attrition for enough time to divert enough forces to the west, allowing Stalin to unleash a reverse Barbarossa from the west
And that won‘t happen in all likelihood because the thread is not named "The French Century" 😉
It reamins to be seen how much of the plan is ideologically motivated wishful thinking...
 
And that won‘t happen in all likelihood because the thread is not named "The French Century" 😉
It reamins to be seen how much of the plan is ideologically motivated wishful thinking...
Congressman never said it would work, did he? Between the various purges and the lack of a Winter War to figure out the problems, a Soviet Barbarossa is probably as successful as the Nazi one.
 
Congressman never said it would work, did he? Between the various purges and the lack of a Winter War to figure out the problems, a Soviet Barbarossa is probably as successful as the Nazi one.
Fair enough. I hope to see some kind of Six-Day-War style pre-emptive attack by Germany that puts the Red French on the back foot from the beginning...
 
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