The Free Man’s Republic: A Story of Jubilation

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by manitobot, Apr 11, 2019.

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  1. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the butterflies could have happened in time for the Patriot Rebellion to be more of a thing in this TL.
     
  2. jocay Well-Known Member

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    Aug 21, 2018
    The British could always move the emancipated blacks specifically to the east in Natal. It was not yet settled by the Dutch colonists and populated by the Xhosa. I could even forsee an alliance (temporary) between the black settlers and the Xhosa against the Zulu.
     
  3. Unknown Member

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    An interesting variation would be similar to the Draka TL: have the Dutch declare war in 1779 and the British capture Dutch South Africa as a result...

    Still, waiting for more...
     
  4. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    Well for the sake of all Africans involved this won’t turn into a Draka TL specifically lol. Thanks for enjoying the TL.
     
  5. Orisha91 Well-Known Member

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    Jul 2, 2014
    Did not see that coming.

    Huh.
     
  6. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    Sep 28, 2014
    Update!
    Hey guys, I am sorry I haven't been able to post an update in a while, but I have been either indisposed/really busy. Don't worry, this TL is still active! I have plenty planned, and have been doing a lot of research. Hopefully in the near future I can post the next chapter, once my schedule clears up.

    Thanks for being patient.
     
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  7. Threadmarks: Chapter 4- Trials and Tribulations

    manitobot Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    (Colony Commission Meeting- January 1786)


    “You are in jest, Vassa” a delegate cried.

    “It is ludicrous!” another man shouted.

    “I actually think the idea has merit.” a third man uttered.

    The Commission often joked that at this point they would settle for ANY location. By far one of the most critical factors of the colony, it had been met with only rancorous debate in committee. Accordingly, they were skeptical when Vassa called a special meeting in mid-January over an idea he assuaged would be opportune. For most, it would be just a waste of time. When the men however heard his actual plan for a location, it was met with equal parts mirth and confusion.

    “Gentlemen, it is our best hope. I have poured over the atlas and under God’s good graces it fits.”

    “How? You seriously intend to settle us in the Cape?”

    “Yes.”

    “The Dutch-owned, native occupied, location that is the site of two international slave trades?”

    “It is better than any location we have so far. Gentleman, if I can present my findings to this Commission we can finally present something of use to Chairman Granville...”


    (Society proceedings later in the week)


    “...As explained to the Commission, Africa is situated in the tropics, which none of us know how to cultivate and recieve the fruits of Nature heretofore, or have any experiences with diseases said present there. Southern Africa has a mild climate, blessed and evidenced by European establishments there.”

    “The reasoning is sound Vassa, no one is doubting that,” Chairman Granville interrupted the speech, “But two facets of this proposal are still awry. The Cape is owned by the Dutch, and slavery is very prevalent on both oceans. Though I suspect you have developed countermeasures?”

    “Yes Chairman. You see, while the Dutch may have colonized the Cape, the Eastern clutches of this land is yet unclaimed by the Company. This fertile land is thus not foreign occupied. Now as to slavery. Any location we choose would need HM’s help militarily for protection of our settlers. Our government, reasonably, is naturally hesitant to vanguard areas that are economically not valuable. However this being a supremely conducive trade location, the Crown would be more inclined to provide for our defense compared to anywhere else. Most of the Black Poor have experience in sailing and in the military. And thus, we have our cake, and eat it too.”

    “Well, gentleman. It seems the idea has merit…” the Chairman suggested. And most of the room was inclined to agree….

    And thus it was set in motion and in the coming days would successfully passed by the Society. With jubilation, it was passed on to HM’s government which would immediately, and quite enthusiastically, get started on a squadron. The Society would then work to secure supplies, ships, and register individuals for the journey. With this world’s support and collaboration of Cugoano and Equino, nearly 600 black poor would sign on for the initial colony. With everything arranged by May, the ships would depart with fanfare and sail to the planned location of land between the Keiskamma and Buffalo rivers for a proclaimed “Province of Freedom”....

    (Terra Nullus, near modern-Day East London, Southeastern Africa, June 25 1787)

    Ships appeared on the horizon, gently sailing into the mouth of the Buffalo River. A smaller ship would spring from the hulking wooden mass, and gingerly navigate onto the sandy clutches of Africa. A group of men and women, huddled in woolen blankets, would leap off and trudge along the beach and the blistering sun.

    A man would turn to his wife, and smile, uttering the first few words of the colonists:
    "We are home."

    Postface: Hey guys! Its been a while, but I am back at it. Thank you for waiting so long. Anyways, they finally did it! They made it to Africa. And @jocay hit the nail on the head. Stay tuned, as the journey continues!
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019 at 2:28 AM
  8. Orisha91 Well-Known Member

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    Jul 2, 2014
    Finally made it.
    Good to see the motivations at work here.
     
  9. Fifty-One-Fifty Active Member

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    Dec 8, 2017
    Just read this all and what an interesting idea and what great writing!

    Are there skilled craftsman among the settlers, or are most sailors and former military?
     
  10. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    Sep 28, 2014
    There are some skilled craftsman and farmers among the settlers but most are sailors or served in the military, which is why for a while the tradesmen and people in agriculture will be directing and advising the beginnings of the colony.
     
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  11. Threadmarks: Chapter 5: Building Up

    manitobot Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    (Letter to Oladauh Equino)

    My Dearest Equino,

    I hope this letter sees you well in the Year of our Lord One Thousand and Seven Hundred Eighty Seven. As of writing this, it is September, and no doubt you shall get this while we are planting around Christmas. Indeed, it is strange, but foremostly to cultivate the fruits of Nature on this Provident Land the seasons indeed are in reverse here. I must concur that Persephone chose the opposite facing pomegranete seeds in Africa.

    I hope that joke finds you in good humor, for we despite the prevailing conditions are in high spirits. I shall summarily tell you of our exploits since Landing Day.

    After meeting with HM’s land surveyors we set about establishing the settlement on a clear area of land. The masonry experience that our military guard possesses has indeed been quite beneficial in the establishment of the colony. What an innovative idea, establishing our military defense from HM’s government from veterans from Lord Dunmore’s Ethiopian Regiment and the Clinton Black Company of Pioneers companies that served in the American War. Especially securing HM’s government to provide property compensation and pensions to our veterans that re-enlisted, my fellow former veterans have pride again, training those months in Britain, as do I-this military will care and feel deep passions and pains for this colony compared to an aloof foreign brigade, not that we aren’t thankful for the skilled men sent by HM's government for additional support.. But it is a definite boon, one that freed up funds for other ventures of the project, and elicited great praise from what I hear from HM’s government. The engineering corps, that has been honing their crafts and trades in London- has indeed been most industrious, now that they are able to put their talents at grasp, constructing and engineering the foundations of our buildings as well as teaching their trades to people to continue their previous learnings from London. Indeed I feel confident that the Freedman’s Battalion, engineers and fighters alike, can adequately defend us from slavers and foreign threats. I myself dream of getting a rank advancement, though I know even with my previous service that black men don’t generally rise to higher positions. Regardless, my esteemed regards to the Crown Commission.

    Cultivations of the land proceed swimmingly and the first plantings of wheat, maize, and all sorts and manners of crops are proceeding at breakneck speeds. For former slaves, the prospect of returning to the yoke is not at all daunting now that there remains no whip on end. The agricultural experience we have also manifested in Britain has served us well, but I need not remind you of our agricultural past- many of us have knowledge working in fields, and have experience with this arduous work. The land here I suspect, shall be very productive. As of now, fishing, particularly among sailors, game-hunting, and foraging have also sustained us majorly, with loads of fish now being dried and preserved for later consumption in next winter’s time.

    The town itself is being built. Houses have been raised in large amounts, and roads are being planned and sorted throughout the area. Plans are being taken for the creation of a church as well as a fort for the purposes of protection. Plots of land are being divided and distributed, I cannot tell you the delight us black men now have opportunities to own our own land. We have christened this settlement Port Granville.

    Certainly interesting is that we have one instance of spotty contact with natives. We found a small group of them leering in the distance over our settlements, and have made some communication with a small grouping of them over several days of which they promptly left, albeit unremarkable. They call themselves Khosa, and of note display fascinating clicking sounds when speaking. They possess traits of animal husbandry, and this group were accompanied with cattle. I would like to think we would have a better kinship as both colored men, but they may see us just the same as our ancestors in Guinea saw the white man. We traded some glass, beads, and tobacco for some foodstuffs, but nothing of event came from the interaction. I pray for a peaceful coexistence with our two peoples.


    With this I shall bid you adieu. It would be most agreeable if I can send you another letter by harvesting season.


    Warm Tidings,
    Thomas Peters.


    Post Script: Peculiarly, The first religious service was not partaken by us Christians, but by the Mohammadan blacks and Lascars on the current Friday we took ashore. Most peculiarly the following day, several Lascars performed what was a Hindoo ritual as well. The Christian service went up that Sunday, in due time. Something to note.


    Postface: Sup guys. So things are coming along seemingly well in the creation of this colony. Lets keep the good times rollin. Stay tuned, as the journey continues!
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019 at 3:11 AM
  12. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    Any comments about the latest chapters?
     
  13. Unknown Member

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    Good updates; waiting for more...
     
  14. GrizzlyTrotsky Active Member

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    May 28, 2010
    This is definitely going to be interesting. The settlers I think are still going to have a rough coexistence with the Xhosa; an invasion is still an invasion, after all. How it will be different from Cape Town though? I guess we'll see.
     
  15. Orisha91 Well-Known Member

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    Jul 2, 2014
    Xhosa get a shot in the arm. That's always good.

    Wonder how scary the Zulu will be.
     
  16. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    Yes the Xhosa-freemen interactions will definitely be something to behold in future events. Its important to keep in mind there is no innate kinship between the two because of their skin color- they are foreign settlers like any other people. And both the freedmen and the British are going to have to reconcile with that, and try and overcome that to work with the Xhosa.
     
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  17. Strategos' Risk Oriental Orientalist

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    Homeline
    So long as it ends up better than the experience in Liberia, I guess.
     
  18. manitobot Well-Known Member

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    It will definitely end up a better experience than Liberia or Sierra Leone.
     
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