April 1471: Prompted by Edward Tudor, a large revolt begins in Pembroke. 4,850 Welshmen seize Pembroke Castle and surrounding towns and fend off attempts by local soldiers to retake them. Edward organises men across Wales to launch hit and run attacks on any English army who comes to defeat him. Edward himself commands from behind the front lines, while more seasoned soldiers lead the troops. Simultaneously, the Baron of Clifford harasses English ships with a sizeable fleet that Louis XI lended to him.

Edward IV doesn’t pay heed to them. He is fuming at the betrayal of Charles the Bold and secretly plots war on him to retake Calais. However, he mostly plans a two front attack on France. A southern attack on Gascony which Edmund, Duke of York shall lead and an attack on Rouen which he shall lead. George, Duke of Clarence shall serve as Regent of England in his absnece. He amassed 18,000 men for the Gascony campaign and 26,000 for the Rouen campaign.


In Castile, Alfonso focuses on fortifying his territories to prevent the French from advancing. At the same time, Juana falls pregnant with child, much to Alfonso’s delight.

May 1471: A force of 500 Welshmen seize the town of Denbigh on Edward Tudor’s orders. At the same time, many of Edward IV’s officials are kidnapped and held for ransom, so that the Welshmen may gather revenue for their campaign.

Back in France, Sir Ralph Percy and Andrew Trollope over see Charles Beaufort’s education. The young claimant is noted to be bright and fascinated with military history and strategy. Louis in particular becomes fond of the boy and imagines him as an ally of France.
Edmund, Duke of York, is in a french jail.
 
Chapter 59 - Peace at last
June 1471: In other news, Elizabeth Woodville dies giving birth to a daughter named Marian Fitzroy after the Robin Hood legend which Elizabeth and Edward loved. Edward, still faithfully maintaining his vow, does accept all his legitimate and illegitimate children at court. However, any woman but Queen Eleanor is permitted to play as their mother. While it is well known that Edward has been a less than stellar father until now, he is genuinely trying to be a good father, though he finds it difficult to have a close relationship with his nearly a dozen children.

July 1471: Queen Eleanor of England gives birth to a healthy daughter, which is christened after herself. This is especially poignant since one of the sickly Fitzroy triplets, also named Eleanor, died. Edward’s continued offenses against the French finally resulted in peace. A treaty is signed on July 17th.
- England gets Normandy and Calais, but nothing more. There is an armistice for 10 years.
- France gets a hefty sum of money.
- The Dauphin should marry Cecily of York.
- Brittany, shrunk in size, will be given back to the Jean, Edward’s nephew, and Princess Anne of France is betrothed to him.
- Peace will also stand between Burgundy and England.
- Edward Tudor will be exchanged along with young Charles Beaufort and all the other Lancastrians held by the France.
- Edmund, Duke of York will be exchanged and married to Marie of Burgundy.
As a result, Edward Tudor will be executed upon landing. Little Charles Beaufort would have been able to live in safety, but his ship sank, and he drowned in the English Channel. Tudor’s only nephew, Henry Tudor, makes a public vow of faithfulness to Edward IV.

August 1471: Margaret of York, Dowager Queen of England, is married to Ferdinand, Duke of Braganza. Edward IV, George of Clarence, and his brother Edmund have a tearful reunion. Edmund takes kindly to his new wife, who cares deeply for her new stepchildren. She will be pregnant by the years end.

Marriages:
Margaret of York to Ferdinand, Duke of Braganza
Edmund, Duke of York to Marie of Burgundy

Deaths:
Elizabeth Woodville, Countess of Winchester
Edward Tudor
Charles Beaufort
Eleanor Fitzroy

Children:
Marian Fitzroy, daughter of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville
Eleanor of England, daughter of Edward IV and Eleanor of Naples.

Pregnancies:
Marie, Duchess of York, due April 1472
 
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June 1471: In other news, Elizabeth Woodville dies giving birth to a daughter named Marian Fitzroy after the Robin Hood legend which Elizabeth and Edward loved. Edward, still faithfully maintaining his vow, does accept all his legitimate and illegitimate children at court. However, any woman but Queen Eleanor is permitted to play as their mother. While it is well known that Edward has been a less than stellar father until now, he is genuinely trying to be a good father, though he finds it difficult to have a close relationship with his nearly a dozen children.

July 1471: Queen Eleanor of England gives birth to a healthy daughter, which is christened after herself. Edward’s continued offenses against the French finally resulted in peace. A treaty is signed on July 17th.
- England gets Normandy and Calais, but nothing more. There is an armistice for 10 years.
- France gets a hefty sum of money.
- The Dauphin should marry Cecily of York.
- Brittany, shrunk in size, will be given back to the Jean, Edward’s nephew, and Princess Anne of France is betrothed to him.
- Peace will also stand between Burgundy and England.
- Edward Tudor will be exchanged along with young Charles Beaufort and all the other Lancastrians held by the France.
- Edmund, Duke of York will be exchanged and married to Marie of Burgundy.
As a result, Edward Tudor will be executed upon landing. Little Charles Beaufort would have been able to live in safety, but his ship sank, and he drowned in the English Channel. Tudor’s only nephew, Henry Tudor, makes a public vow of faithfulness to Edward IV.

August 1471: Margaret of York, Dowager Queen of England, is married to Ferdinand, Duke of Braganza. Edward IV, George of Clarence, and his brother Edmund have a tearful reunion. Edmund takes kindly to his new wife, who cares deeply for her new stepchildren. She will be pregnant by the years end.

Marriages:
Margaret of York to Ferdinand, Duke of Braganza
Edmund, Duke of York to Marie of Burgundy

Deaths:
Elizabeth Woodville, Countess of Winchester
Edward Tudor
Charles Beaufort

Children:
Marian Fitzroy, daughter of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville
Eleanor of England, daughter of Edward IV and Eleanor of Naples.

Pregnancies:
Marie, Duchess of York, due April 1472
Calais is controlled by Burgundy atm.
 
It’s been given to England, then.
Why? England would have to take it from Burgundy. I also don't understand why England is getting Normandy, something the French wouldn't give them without a complete English victory, while we barely touched on the topic of an invasion.
 
Why? England would have to take it from Burgundy. I also don't understand why England is getting Normandy, something the French wouldn't give them without a complete English victory, while we barely touched on the topic of an invasion.
England’s getting Calais because they are also signing a treaty with Burgundy. There has been invasions (see my post), and they were very successful by the English.
 
July 1471: Edward Tudor executed upon landing? Sure, if he ever landed. The mysterious disappearance of the man himself along with the entire ship is greatly concerning to the French, especially as England refuses to accept responsibility for the disappearance stating that he definitely left English shores.
This contradicts a previous post. I clearly stated he did land and he was executed.
 
Chapter 60 - A Spider Squashed
July 1471: The unexpected death of the Spider-King, Louis XI of France, throws France into turmoil. All his half-completed plans suddenly have to either stop or drastically change. As his heir is a young child, there is a scramble for power on the regency council. His daughters on the other hand are hunting for betrothals. Meanwhile in England, Edward IV chokes on a fish's bone - he survives but is forced to drastically cut down on his meal intake.
 
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July 1471: The unexpected death of the Spider-King, Louis XI of France, throws France into turmoil. All his half-completed plans suddenly have to either stop or drastically change. His widow fails to secure a place on the regency council, and decides to return home. Meanwhile in England, Edward IV chokes on a fish's bone - he survives but is forced to drastically cut down on his meal intake.
Unless I missed something Louis XI isn’t married anyways. Catherine of Bourbon died in 1468.
 
The tide of the war changed.
Please provide a more detailed explanation next time. Simply saying they won a few battles and then got a super favourable peace treaty isn’t sufficient. Go into detail about one battle and what towns they seize at least next time.
 
Chapter 61 - A New Spider
August 1471: Charles, Duke of Anjou secures the Regency of France and becomes King Louis XIII’s Guardian. He soon orders the French army harassing Castile to withdraw and signs a truce with the Kingdom, temporarily bringing peace to France. He soon writes to his cousin, the Duke of Lorraine, to resume their plot to place one of their own on the throne of Aragon.

Speaking of which, Ferdinand of Aragon and his wife, Isabella of Castile have their second son together, a boy whom they name Juan after his Grandfathers. The boy is baptised in a lavish ceremony attended by all the Ambassador’s of Europe’s great powers.

September 1471: In England, Edward IV summons Parliament to levy a new tax. The English treasury has been drained and the Royal household has racked up a debt. He hopes the tax will solve these problems. Simultaneously he creates Lieutenancies in England’s oversea holdings in France and Ireland. These Lieutenants are highly autonomous Governors who can levy taxes and control military affairs as they see fit, though these can be vetoed by the King. They will meet with a small ‘Parliament’ consisting of power natives in the region.

Edward appoints Edmund, Duke of York the Lieutenant of Normandy, the Earl of Salisbury is made the Lieutenant of Calais while George, Duke of Clarence is made Lieutenant of Ireland. The latter sees this as an insult. Years of being Regent in England have given him a taste for governing his homeland yet he is now being sent to a soaking wet island to govern a sliver of coastal land. A position in the north or Wales which could do with some pacification would have been much more ideal to him. Regardless, he takes up the post and moves there.

October 1471: Regent Charles attempts to free Louis XIII of his betrothal to Cecily of York or at least make it favourable to France. First he suggest Cecily’s dowry consist of portions of Normandy, noting Edward’s troublesome financial state. Obviously, Edward refuses and suggests an alternative dowry. Charles then suggests a large sun of 400,000 pounds and a truce that England shall not work against French interest during the Royal Couple’s lifetime.

Edward is outraged at this proposal and refuses. Charles suggests a final proposal. England provide a dowry of 200,000 pounds to be paid over 6 years and vow not to attack French allies. Edward finally agrees and the deal is sealed by the month’s end. However, this has played right into Charles’s hands who quickly sends Ambassadors to every major independent Lord in Ireland. Charles also renews the Auld Alliance by betrothing the widowed Marie of Orleans to Alexander, Duke of Albany. England can no longer expand it’s power within the British isles.

By the time Edward realises this it is far too late. The deal has been accepted and to break it would make him look unreasonable and dishonourable. Edward resigns himself to the fact that the French have won this round.

Births: Infante Juan of Aragon
 
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