The Falling Rain: A Graphics Timeline

Opening Post + 2041 World Map
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
In this great nation, long split in twain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
Through misery, silence, e’erlasting pain.

Pick up your sword, call forth the slain,
Let those past deeds be not in vain.
For what is there left for us to gain,
That will earn us a place in our lord’s domain.

Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
The call of liberty is our refrain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
It shall be freedom for all who is to reign!


114ce88dc654ab3a295add.jpg

(The 1841 Inauguration of the 9th President of the United States, William Henry Harrison)

In the same vein of other excellent graphic timelines like Our Fair Country / These Fair Shores, Nobody Expects, Hail Britannia, Of Droughts and Flooding Rains, A Shining Valley, etc, I have decided to dive into this as well, despite having just started graduate school. This timeline has been in the process of development for well over three years now, and rather than revamp it again and again I think it'd be best to put it out there. A lot of this already exists on my test thread, so the first set of posts will be to get this thread up to speed.

The point of divergence is that William Henry Harrison takes a nice long rest and doesn't work himself to death, therefore making his presidency last a full term. There are some tropes here that present themselves, like a short-lived CSA victory, but it is my hope that things are laid out in a plausible enough manner to excuse the use of these tropes. Historical figures do appear, but transition to fictional ones around the early 1920s. Comments, questions, and suggestions are greatly appreciated, though if anyone would like to contribute things then I ask that you run them by me first.

To begin, here is the map of the world, circa January 22nd, 2041, following the second inauguration of US President Edward Fraser (R-VN):
TFR4 2041 World Map Official 5.png
 
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Joshua Chamberlain + Ely S Parker
TFR4 Pres 21 Joshua Chamberlain.png
Joshua Chamberlain
(September 8th 1828 - February 28th 1883) was an American military hero, politician, and twenty-first president of the United States from the state of Maine. His tumultuous terms in office oversaw the beginning of the Second American Civil War, and he was the second US president to be assassinated.

A noted scholar and professor at Bowdoin College, Chamberlain led a regiment of Maine volunteers during the First American Civil War, where his quick thinking stabilized the US lines during the Battle of Rock Creek, single-handedly saving Washington, DC from capture by the Confederates. For that, he received national fame as the Lion of Bowdoin and the Lion of Rock Creek, and was acclaimed as the Savior of the Republic by President John J Crittenden once the conflict ended. At first going back to his job as a professor, he entered politics as a Unionist-Republican and served four terms as the 32nd Governor of Maine. Appointed to the US Senate by the Maine Legislature after his governorship ended, he became close friends with fellow congressmen Ely S Parker and Oliver Morton, and was an outspoken advocate of continued opposition to the Confederate States. He was chosen by Morton to be his running mate in the 1876 US Presidential election on account of his nationwide popularity, and together they won a decisive victory over their opponents of Steven Douglas, Thomas Hendricks, Daniel Sickles, and symbolic candidate Frederick Douglass.

After seven months in office, Oliver Morton died of complications from a stroke, elevating Chamberlain to the Presidency. His time in office is notable for his mostly successful efforts to deal with the Third Period of the Long Depression as well as his persistent efforts to aid the Haitian Resistance against the occupying Confederate States. He helped to sponsor and pass the 21st Amendment in response to the United Kingdom granting symbolic baronies to notable Confederate leaders, and continued the modernization and strengthening of the United States Army in preparation for an inevitable conflict with the Confederate States. However, his successful navigation and defusing of a potential crisis concerning the Rio Bravo War spiked his popularity in time for the 1880 US Presidential election, which he handily won against the ultimately ineffective campaigning of Samuel Randall. His choice of Ely S Parker as his running mate sparked intense controversy, however, for Parker, being a Tonawanda Seneca, was not technically a US citizen. His choice of Parker (a well known orator and diplomat) over other recommended options is a testament to his strong friendship with Parker and the need to curry favor with dissident groups in the crumbling Confederate States, notably the United Tribes of Sequoyah.

The outbreak of the Confederate Civil War over the contested results of the 1882 CS Presidential election gave Chamberlain the perfect opportunity to reunify the nation. Acting on long prepared plans developed by American strategists like Ulysses S Grant and William T Sherman, US forces made rapid progress into Confederate territory with the aid of Blue Coalition supporters and activists. Chamberlain would not live to see the end of the war, however, for Confederate assassin John Wilkes Booth shot and killed Chamberlain while he was visiting US lines in Northern Virginia.

Chamberlain is well regarded among presidents for being a popular national hero through his actions in both Civil Wars and his forward-thinking approach towards minority groups in the US, in addition to the broad sympathy gained through his assassination. Speculation as to what could have happened had Chamberlain lived is a popular topic among speculative historians to this day.





























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TFR4 Pres 22 Ely S Parker.png
Ely Samuel Parker
(1828 - August 31 1900), born Hasanoanda, later known as Donehogawa, was a Tonawanda Seneca engineer, tribal diplomat, politician, and twenty-second president of the United States from the state of New York. He consistently holds very high positions in historical rankings of US presidents, and is commonly known by his presidential nickname of the Great Reunifier.

Born in 1828 (his exact date of birth is still a contentious question amongst historians), he first studied law for three years as a young man but was unable to take the bar examination due to, as a Tonawanda Seneca, he was not considered a US citizen. A chance meeting with anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan allowed Parker to gain the opportunity to study engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, after which he juggled the roles of being an engineer and being a diplomat and interpreter for Seneca chiefs in their ongoing negations with the US government (he was fully bilingual in the Seneca language and English). During this time he became strong friends with Ulysses S Grant while working on government projects in Illinois, one of many notable friendships Parker accrued over his life.

When the First American Civil War broke out, Parker proposed to raise a regiment of Iroquois volunteers to fight for the United States, a proposal that was accepted by John C Breckinridge in one of his last acts in office in a vain attempt to foment dissent within the United States. Arriving too late to the frontlines to fight in the First American Civil War, the unit was sent westwards to serve in the American Frontier Wars, where Parker made a name for himself through his careful diplomacy and level-headed nature that defused many a conflict and earned him the great admiration of his friend and now supervisor Ulysses S Grant. Charles Francis Adams, upon recommendation from Grant, appointed Parker to be the head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the first First Nation person to hold the role. His long and successful tenure in that role gave him widespread national attention, and he was nominated for and elected to a seat in the US House of Representatives by proud members of his home constituency in New York, according to popular legend, without his knowledge. He served with distinction for three terms in the House, making friends with fellow congressman Joshua Chamberlain, who later chose Parker as his running mate for the 1880 US Presidential election. Despite not being considered a US citizen at the time, powerful oration from Frederick Douglass, Chamberlain, Grant, and other noted Unionist-Republican leaders all but secured Parker's place as Vice President, where he took a prominent role in negotiating with the United Tribes of Sequoyah to gain their defection at the start of the Second American Civil War.

Chamberlain's assassination in 1883 brought Parker to the Presidency, though a special declaration by Congress was necessary to officially grant Parker the required citizenship to assume the position. Had it been anytime other than in the midst of the Second American Civil War, it is doubtful that such a declaration would have been passed, even with Parker's accomplishments. Major US victories in the war assured Parker's reelection in 1884, who controversially ran in order to maintain a continuity of government throughout the war. His choice of James Blaine as his running mate was a well-regarded one, and his victory over William Rosecrans was at a comfortable margin.

Parker's achievements post-1884 are his most famous. He won the Second American Civil War, reunified the nation, passed the 22nd, 23rd, and 24th Amendments, and began the American Conquest of the Southwest. He gave all First Nation peoples US citizenship and radically redefined the relationship of the US government with minority groups, most notably with the creation of state designations of free states (initially for freed blacks in the South) and reserved states (initially for First Nation peoples mainly out west). His efforts dealing with the Fourth Period of the Long Depression didn't quite work out during his term, but things were certainly improving by the time he left office.

After leaving the presidency, Parker enjoyed some quiet time with his family before being appointed by the New York Legislature to the US Senate, where he served for one term. As one of the few former presidents to take political office after his time as president, Congress struggled with what honors to give him, a debate only resolved long after he had finished his term. He died three years after leaving office, surrounded by his family at his home, and is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, New York, next to his ancestor Red Jacket and near to the 11th US President Millard Fillmore.
 
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Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
In this great nation, long split in twain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
Through misery, silence, e’erlasting pain.

Pick up your sword, call forth the slain,
Let those past deeds be not in vain.
For what is there left for us to gain,
That will earn us a place in our lord’s domain.

Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
The call of liberty is our refrain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
It shall be freedom for all who is to reign!


114ce88dc654ab3a295add.jpg

(The 1841 Inauguration of the 9th President of the United States, William Henry Harrison)

In the same vein of other excellent graphic timelines like Our Fair Country / These Fair Shores, Nobody Expects, Hail Britannia, Of Droughts and Flooding Rains, A Shining Valley, etc, I have decided to dive into this as well, despite having just started graduate school. This timeline has been in the process of development for well over three years now, and rather than revamp it again and again I think it'd be best to put it out there. A lot of this already exists on my test thread, so the first set of posts will be to get this thread up to speed.

The point of divergence is that William Henry Harrison takes a nice long rest and doesn't work himself to death, therefore making his presidency last a full term. There are some tropes here that present themselves, like a short-lived CSA victory, but it is my hope that things are laid out in a plausible enough manner to excuse the use of these tropes. Historical figures do appear, but transition to fictional ones around the early 1920s. Comments, questions, and suggestions are greatly appreciated, though if anyone would like to contribute things then I ask that you run them by me first.

To begin, here is the map of the world, circa January 22nd, 2041, following the second inauguration of US President Edward Fraser (R-VN):
View attachment 678025
That has to be one of the busiest world maps I’ve ever seen for any timeline. Kudos 😛

And President Ely Parker? As the politibrits of old would say, phresh
 
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Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
In this great nation, long split in twain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
Through misery, silence, e’erlasting pain.

Pick up your sword, call forth the slain,
Let those past deeds be not in vain.
For what is there left for us to gain,
That will earn us a place in our lord’s domain.

Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
The call of liberty is our refrain.
Oh on and on shall fall the rain,
It shall be freedom for all who is to reign!


114ce88dc654ab3a295add.jpg

(The 1841 Inauguration of the 9th President of the United States, William Henry Harrison)

In the same vein of other excellent graphic timelines like Our Fair Country / These Fair Shores, Nobody Expects, Hail Britannia, Of Droughts and Flooding Rains, A Shining Valley, etc, I have decided to dive into this as well, despite having just started graduate school. This timeline has been in the process of development for well over three years now, and rather than revamp it again and again I think it'd be best to put it out there. A lot of this already exists on my test thread, so the first set of posts will be to get this thread up to speed.

The point of divergence is that William Henry Harrison takes a nice long rest and doesn't work himself to death, therefore making his presidency last a full term. There are some tropes here that present themselves, like a short-lived CSA victory, but it is my hope that things are laid out in a plausible enough manner to excuse the use of these tropes. Historical figures do appear, but transition to fictional ones around the early 1920s. Comments, questions, and suggestions are greatly appreciated, though if anyone would like to contribute things then I ask that you run them by me first.

To begin, here is the map of the world, circa January 22nd, 2041, following the second inauguration of US President Edward Fraser (R-VN):
View attachment 678025
do Paraguay Win the War of the Triple Alliance?
And lol as Always i Hate the Africa borders in these Graphics timelines ( Just kidding Of Course i Don't hate your timeline And Any Other Too)
 
Nice Start!
Thank you!
That has to be one of the busiest world maps I’ve ever seen for any timeline. Kudos 😛

And President Ely Parker? As the politibrits of old would say, phresh
Yeah, it has precisely 301 nations. Certainly could have been higher :openedeyewink:
do Paraguay Win the War of the Triple Alliance?
And lol as Always i Hate the Africa borders in these Graphics timelines ( Just kidding Of Course i Don't hate your timeline And Any Other Too)
Yes, Paraguay does win, and the conflict includes an earlier War of the Pacific, with Franco-British intervention for good measure.
Looking forward to learning more about this world.
Things will be revealed in good time. Happy to have you aboard!
 
What’s the Cold War going to be like? And how is America in terms of stability?
The Cold War had three sides to it - a stratocratic Germany, a social revolutionary then war communist Russia, and the democratic Anglo-Americans. Technically it is still ongoing, despite the fall of both stratocratic Germany in the late 1960s and war communist Russia in the early 2000s, with stratocratic Greece and war communist West Sudan taking their places.

America is not that stable. There have been numerous rebellions in the South since the fall of the Confederate States, most recently due to the machinations of President David Teller who attempted to overthrow the democratic republic in 2036. It's not a perfect world, nor is it really a better world, but it is not terrible.
 
American Internal Conflicts
When had the rebellions occurred?
These are the more famous ones, with well over 5,000 deaths each:
TFR4 American Internal Conflicts.png

The Eden Rising / Governor's Feud was the first major rebellion in the Southern Region following the end of the Second Civil War. It came as a result of Federal efforts to dismantle the former Confederate executive capital of New Eden (once Huntsville, Alabama). Governor Joseph F Johnston refused to allow Federal troops near the city, an act of defiance supported by Georgia Governor William Yates Atkinson. Both were former Confederate officials that managed to cheat around the restrictions of the 23rd Amendment which prohibited former Confederates from holding political office. As such, President Benjamin Harrison supported a plan to include Alabama as an additional free state alongside Mississippi, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Cuba, and placed noted African-American leader Booker T Washington as the Governor of the Free State of Alabama. Bloodshed soon reigned throughout Alabama as wealthy whites saw their properties confiscated and redistributed for a second time, though due to the heavy losses inflicted on the Southern Region from the Second Civil War, things did not spiral completely out of control. Governor Johnston fled to Mexico, while Governor Atkinson was forced to resign from office, and both were barred from holding office ever again.

The Great Southern Rebellion was the second major rebellion in the Southern Region. Launched just days after the death and funeral of the Last Confederate States President, John Reagan, the rebellion was the culmination of two decades worth of planning and preparation. Pro-Confederate rebels seized control of Austin, Little Rock, Macon, Nashville, and Bowling Green, while efforts in North Carolina and Virginia were foiled by widespread New Regulator and Readjuster popular support respectively. Reprisals were quickly launched into the free states, seeking to do as much damage as possible before Federal troops arrived. Luckily, the Regional Defense Brigades of the free states were able to form up into cohesive units thanks to the week of celebrations that occurred following the fall of the last non-free state capital, and were able to prevent the worst massacres. Compounding this was the reliance on two decade old military equipment on the part of the rebels, equipment that was woefully out of date compared to that wielded by the RDBs. The Rebellion prevented President Albert Beveridge from declaring an end to Reconstruction, which ended up lasting for two more decades.

The Dixie Spring/Autumn Period and the Years of Lead were the third major rebellion in the Southern Region. Despite the widespread support that populist President Henry Longmile had throughout the South, having been the Governor of Louisiana for a record twelve years, there was still lingering resentment over his perceived inability to truly bring the United States out of the Great Depression. His assassination during the closing ceremonies of the XII Summer Olympiad was the spark needed to launch a resurrection of the Confederate States. 1942-1943 is typically termed as the Dixie Spring Period, where rebels achieved a high level of success in spite of long odds. 1943-1944 is termed as the Dixie Autumn Period, where Federal troops at last restored order and crushed the major holdouts. Until 1948 the conflict is termed as the Years of Lead, where fanatical neo-Confederates waged terrorist campaigns across the United States, gunning down congressmen and other American notables in confrontations that often ended in suicide. Order was finally restored only after President Matthias Hull flooded the South with Federal troops following the assassination of Vice President Ulysses Hanford, the first African-American to hold that title.

The Weeks of Rage were the fourth major rebellion in the Southern Region, occurring in opposition to President Mary Margaret Wesington-Smith's Second Bill of Rights, which the neo-Confederates of the White Legion perceived to be rabidly communistic. Unlike the other major rebellions, this one had no real central organizing structure, for the White Legion was deeply decentralized, a trait acquired by all neo-Confederate organizations following the Spring/Autumn Period. This rebellion was also a manifestation of popular anger due to the ongoing effects of the Sable Depression and the disruptions in the global oil market as a result of the Egyptian Civil War. Thanks to the rapid response of Federal troops, who by this point were well-versed in anti-neo-Confederate warfare, this rebellion only lasted for six weeks with comparably fewer overall casualties.

The Third American Civil War and the Troubles were the fifth major rebellion in the Southern Region, and the first to gain widespread support elsewhere in the United States. Due to the efforts of populist President David Teller to undermine the American democratic republic, anti-government insurgents were able to nearly decapitate the US government in the Battle of Washington following the contested 2036 Election. The rapid deployment of Federal troops stemmed the bloodletting, but only after half of Congress had been murdered. In a repeat of the Spring/Autumn Period and the Years of Lead, major insurgent resistance crumbled in the face of overwhelming odds, but bombing and shooting campaigns by lone wolf insurgents continued for over six years.
 
John J Crittenden
TFR4 Pres 15 John J Crittenden.png

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10th 1787 - December 23rd 1864) was an American statesman, politician, and the fifteenth president of the United States from the state of Kentucky. His term as president lasted for 234 days, one of the shortest presidential terms in US history, and was the first president to die of natural causes in office. His death sparked a major constitutional crisis regarding the succession to the presidency, for he had already ascended to the presidency upon the impeachment and removal of Simon Cameron, who himself had ascended to the presidency upon the resignation of John C Breckinridge, who himself had ascended to the presidency upon the assassination of James Bayard Jr.

Over the course of Crittenden's political career, he served in the Kentucky House of Represenatives, represented the state in the US Senate, served as the United States Attorney General in the administration of William Henry Harrison, and was Vice President for Millard Fillmore. He also ran for the presidency in the election of 1856, but lost to James Bayard Jr., whereupon he went into a brief retirement before returning to politics to represent Kentucky in the US House of Representatives where he was elected as House Speaker. A long time ally of fellow Whig politician Henry Clay, he was a member of the Whig Party for almost all of its existence, and served as the last explicit Whig member of Congress.

At 76 years of age at the time of his ascension to the presidency, Crittenden is the oldest person to have served as President. One of his sons, George B Crittenden, would go on to serve in the Army of the Confederate States of America, while another son, Thomas L Crittenden, would go on to serve in the Army of the United States of America, with both serving in the Second American Civil War.

Historians have a difficult time evaluating Crittenden. His place after the utter debacles of Bayard, Breckinridge, and Cameron have led some to conclude that had he been elected in 1856 then perhaps the issues of secession could have been avoided. His authorship of the 1860 Crittenden Compromise, for instance, a series of constitutional amendments and resolutions, could have prevented the formation of the Confederate States and the two American Civil Wars. However, his intensely moderate nature and focus on compromise may still not have succeeded, for the division of the United States by that point in time was all but inevitable. Additionally, he accepted the fait accompli of the near-peaceful separation of the United States rather than resisting like many in Congress urged him to do, allowing for the Confederate States to establish itself on the international stage. His death in office spurred the adoption of the 14th Amendment, which codifies the line of succession for the presidency beyond the offices of the president pro tempore and the Speaker of the House. Indeed, his death also allowed for the historical precedent of the 33rd Amendment which changed Inauguration Day to January 22nd, based on the emergency declaration by Congress that allowed Charles Francis Adams to assume the presidency before the established Inauguration Day of March 4th.
 
Olympics Locations and 2026 Olympic Bids
  • I Summer Olympiad (Athens, Greece): 1898
  • II Summer Olympiad (Paris, France): 1902
  • III Summer Olympiad (Rome, Italy): 1906
  • IV Summer Olympiad (London, United Kingdom): 1910
  • V Summer Olympiad (Berlin, North Germany): 1914
  • VI Summer Olympiad (Chicago, United States): 1918 [First Wartime Games]
  • VII Summer Olympiad (Stockholm, Sweden-Norway): 1922
  • VIII Summer Olympiad (Antwerp, Belgium): 1926
    • I Winter Olympiad (Davos, Switzerland): 1926
  • IX Summer Olympiad (Prague, Czechoslovakia): 1930
    • II Winter Olympiad (Poprad, Czechoslovakia): 1930
  • X Summer Olympiad (Amsterdam, Netherlands): 1934
    • III Winter Olympiad (Oslo, Sweden-Norway): 1934
  • XI Summer Olympiad (Warsaw, Poland): 1938
    • IV Winter Olympiad (Zakopane, Poland): 1938
  • XII Summer Olympiad (Baltimore, United States): 1942 [Second Wartime Games]
    • V Winter Olympiad (Bear Mountain, United States): 1942
  • XIII Summer Olympiad (London, United Kingdom): 1946
    • VI Winter Olympiad (Glencoe, United Kingdom): 1946
  • XIV Summer Olympiad (Cairo, Egypt): 1950
    • VII Winter Olympiad (Davos, Switzerland): 1950
  • XV Summer Olympiad (Helsinki, Finland): 1954
    • VIII Winter Olympiad (Lahti, Finland): 1954
  • XVI Summer Olympiad (Cologne, Arminian Germany): 1958 [Third Wartime Games]
    • IX Winter Olympiad (Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Arminian Germany): 1958
  • XVII Summer Olympiad (Lausanne, Switzerland): 1962
    • X Winter Olympiad (Davos, Switzerland): 1962
  • XVIII Summer Olympiad (Buenos Aires, Argentina): 1966 [Fourth Wartime Games]
    • XI Winter Olympiad (Santiago, Chile): 1966
  • XIX Summer Olympiad (Montreal, Canada): 1970
    • XII Winter Olympiad (Montreal, Canada): 1970
  • XX Summer Olympiad (Sydney, Australia): 1974
    • XIII Winter Olympiad (Kiandra, Australia): 1974
  • XXI Summer Olympiad (Milan, Italy): 1978
    • XIV Winter Olympiad (Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy): 1978
  • XXII Summer Olympiad (Madrid, Spain): 1982
    • XV Winter Olympiad (Jaca, Spain): 1982
  • XXIII Summer Olympiad (Paris, France): 1986
    • XVI Winter Olympiad (Grenoble, France): 1986
  • XXIV Summer Olympiad (Moscow, Eurasia): 1990
    • XVII Winter Olympiad (Sochi, Eurasia): 1990
  • XXV Summer Olympiad (Denver, United States): 1994
    • XVIII Winter Olympiad (Aspen, United States): 1994
  • XXVI Summer Olympiad (Athens, Neo-Byzantium): 1998 [Fifth Wartime Games]
    • XIX Winter Olympiad (Olympus, Neo-Byzantium): 1998
  • XXVII Summer Olympiad (Mexico City, Mexico): 2002
    • XX Winter Olympiad (Monterreal, Mexico): 2002
  • XXVIII Summer Olympiad (Cape Town, Drakia): 2006
    • XXI Winter Olympiad (Tiffindell, Transkei): 2006
  • XXIX Summer Olympiad (London, United Kingdom): 2010
    • XXII Winter Olympiad (Glencoe, United Kingdom): 2010
  • XXX Summer Olympiad (Munich, Germany): 2014
    • XXIII Winter Olympiad (Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany): 2014
  • XXXI Summer Olympiad (Agra, India): 2018
    • XXIV Winter Olympiad (Manali, India): 2018
  • XXXII Summer Olympiad (Hangzhou, China): 2022
    • XXV Winter Olympiad (Harbin, China): 2022
  • XXXIII Summer Olympiad (Philadelphia, United States): 2026
    • XXVI Winter Olympiad (Bear Mountain, United States): 2026
  • XXXIV Summer Olympiad (Tokyo, Japan): 2030
    • XXVII Winter Olympiad (Nagano, Japan): 2030
  • XXXV Summer Olympiad (Melbourne, Australia): 2034
    • XXVIII Winter Olympiad (Kiandra, Australia): 2034
  • XXXVI Summer Olympiad (Budapest, Hungary): 2038
    • XXIX Winter Olympiad (Kékes, Hungary): 2038
  • XXXVII Summer Olympiad (Lisbon, Portugal): 2042
    • XXX Winter Olympiad (Loriga, Portugal): 2042
  • XXXVIII Summer Olympiad (Calgary, New Caledonia): 2046
    • XXXI Winter Olympiad (Banff, New Caledonia): 2046
  • XXXIX Summer Olympiad (Tyre, Phoenicia and Haifa, Canaan): 2050
    • XXXII Winter Olympiad (The Cedars, Lebanon): 2050
  • XXXX Summer Olympiad (Tashkent, Uzbekistan): 2054
    • XXXIII Winter Olympiad (Almaty, Kyrgyzstan): 2054
  • XXXXI Summer Olympiad (Copenhagen, Denmark): 2058
    • XXXIV Winter Olympiad (Reykjavik, Iceland): 2058
  • XXXXII Summer Olympiad (San Francisco, United States): 2062
    • XXXV Winter Olympiad (Tahoe City, United States): 2062

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TFR4 2026 Olympiad.png
The bidding process to host the 2026 Olympiad received a record ten bids for host cities by their respective Olympic National Committees (ONC), with ultimately the American bid for Philadelphia/Bear Mountain being selected at the 118th IOC Session in Accra.

The bidding process for the Olympiad begins with a convocation by each individual ONC about six months before the bid deadline, wherein a decision is made as to propose a bid for the Olympiad. Each bid is comprised of two cities, one for the Summer Olympics and one for the Winter Olympics, though joint efforts between two collaborating nations is not uncommon. The bid are then presented to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in time before the bid deadline, wherein the list is refined over the subsequent year and a half before a decision is reached an announced at the Closing Ceremonies of that year's Summer Olympics, thus giving host cities eight years to prepare.

The awarding of the 2026 Olympiad to the United States marks the fourth time the United States has hosted the games, and celebrates the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Prior US hostings have been marred with tragedy - the 1918 Olympiad (Chicago) occurred during the Summer of Blood syndicalist uprisings, and the 1942 Olympiad (Baltimore/Bear Mountain) ended with the assassination of President Henry Longmile and the start of the Years of Lead. The 1994 Olympiad (Denver/Aspen), meanwhile, was a calm affair in contrast. The 2026 Olympiad marks the second time Bear Mountain, New York has hosted the Winter Olympics, the most for any US location. The United States has submitted a bid for every Olympiad except the first three, the most of any nation.

Of the other bids, Austria turned down an offer with Tyrol for a joint effort, seeking instead to host its first Olympiad all on its own. Likewise, Morocco, New Zealand, Hungary, and Japan all sought to host their first Olympiad, as did the Kurdistan-Georgia joint effort (a first for both) and Andorra (first for itself, second for Spain). France meanwhile sought its third Olympiad, the second for Grenoble and the third for Paris. Sweden's bid was its first as solely Sweden, for its prior two Olympiads were the 1922 Stockholm Summer Olympics and the 1934 Oslo Winter Olympics (complemented with that year's Amsterdam Summer Olympics), both times hosting as Sweden-Norway.

As for the 2026 games themselves, tragedy struck yet again with the Odyssey 9 disaster two years prior. While four astronauts did return home from Venus in time for the Summer Olympics, the deaths of six astronauts was a dark cloud to overcome, and likely contributed to President Roberta Castro's electoral defeat in 2028 to the traitorous David Teller.
 
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I'm really liking your timeline right now. What stands out to me is your graphics; it makes it look like it is something off of an alternate wikipedia. I do have a couple of quick questions: How did the United States come to own an additional chunk of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest? And did the United States invest time and energy into grabbing islands out in the Pacific?

And how did the Confederate Civil War break out?
 
I'm really liking your timeline right now. What stands out to me is your graphics; it makes it look like it is something off of an alternate wikipedia. I do have a couple of quick questions: How did the United States come to own an additional chunk of the Pacific Northwest and Southwest? And did the United States invest time and energy into grabbing islands out in the Pacific?

And how did the Confederate Civil War break out?
Thanks! I really don't know how to use the Wikipedia sandbox, so all my graphics are just wrangling tables in Google Drawings.

The expansionist crises of the 1840s are flipped - Texas does not join the Union until it joins the CSA, precluding expansion to the Southwest, and there's a war scare with Britain over the Oregon Country that gives the US more land. If you look closely the Adams-Onis line is still visible in forming the boundaries of the western states. Mexico has a poor time and loses control over its northwestern provinces, turning the entire US Southwest into an anarchy of small states that the US slowly absorbs following the annexation of the CSA. I've got a map of the world in 1882 that explains the situation that'll be up relatively soon. And the US does own a bunch of Pacific land - Hawaii and Samoa (all of it) are states, and Guam/Marianas, Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands are all incorporated territories.

The Confederate Civil War happens due to the Election of 1882. Reagan technically wins, but every other candidate decides to claim the presidency over issues of endemic fraud. And by that time the boll weevil is making its rounds too, certainly not helping things.
 
The Commonwealth of Drakia appreciates your support in their long struggle to contain the South African National Republic. Report to your nearest recruitment center to join the Capelands and Southlands Protective Containment Force today!
What is the South African National Republic like?
 
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