The elephant, the lynx, the two wolves, the dragon, the eagle, the griffon vulture and the bull.

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Antonio Ferrari, Mar 16, 2018.

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What country should I do next?

Poll closed Apr 23, 2018.
  1. Siam

    18.5%
  2. Spain

    3.7%
  3. Italy

    11.1%
  4. Japan

    11.1%
  5. Romania

    14.8%
  6. Ottoman Empire

    11.1%
  7. Albania

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Austria-Hungary

    14.8%
  9. Germany

    14.8%
  10. Bulgaria

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
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  1. Threadmarks: 10 Pages celebration: Questions and Answers

    Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    10 Pages celebration: Questions and Answers
    In order to celebrate the 10 pages we've reached, I've decided to open a Q and A. Here, on the site, you can ask all kind of actions, such as:
    1)your favourite movies, cartoons, videogames and books, how would they look in this timeline? Say one hystorical game, cartoon, movie or book and I'll try to show its alternative in this timeline. It can also be other works of fictions that are not necessarely about WW1. It can also be Manga's and Anime's.
    2)general question about the timeline
    So go ahead! Make your questions! I'll try to answer them!
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018
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  2. Lenwe Well-Known Member

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    1) OK lets do this
    -For Books The lord of The Rings or All quiet on the Western front
    - For Movies the Great Dictator
    - Cartoon Betty boop boop

    2) What is Germany doing right now? as USA and England is doing all in their power to cut them from the world trade, they have Africa, but Africa is underdeveloped and need a lot of capital invest to be a net help on their economy, and Asia is too far away and too close to Russia and a Revanchist China to be of much help
     
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  3. Threadmarks: WW1 Special number 5°:All quiet on the Western front

    Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    Como, Italy
    WW1 Special number 5°:All quiet on the Western front
    All Quiet on the Western Front (German: Im Westen nichts Neues, lit. 'In the West Nothing New') is a novel by Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I. The book describes the German soldiers' extreme physical and mental stress during the war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front. The novel was first published in November and December 1928 in the German newspaper Vossische Zeitung and in book form in late January 1929. All Quiet on the Western Front sold 2.5 million copies in 22 languages in its first 18 months in print.
    In 1930, the book was adapted as an Academy-Award-winning film of the same name, directed by Lewis Milestone. It was adapted again in 1979 by Delbert Mann, this time as a television film starring Richard Thomas and Ernest Borgnine.

    Title and Translation:
    The English translation by Arthur Wesley Wheen gives the title as All Quiet on the Western Front. The literal translation of "Im Westen nichts Neues" is "In the West Nothing New," with "West" being the Western Front; the phrase refers to the content of an official communiqué at the end of the novel.
    Brian Murdoch's 1993 translation would render the phrase as "there was nothing new to report on the Western Front" within the narrative. Explaining his retention of the original book-title, he says: "Although it does not match the German exactly, Wheen's title has justly become part of the English language and is retained here with gratitude."
    The phrase "all quiet on the Western Front" has become a colloquial expression meaning stagnation, or lack of visible change, in any context.

    Plot:
    The book tells the story of Paul Bäumer, a German soldier who—urged on by his school teacher—joins the German army shortly after the start of World War I. His class was "scattered over the platoons amongst Frisian fishermen, peasants, and labourers." Bäumer arrives at the Western Front with his friends and schoolmates (Leer, Müller, Kropp and a number of other characters). There they meet Stanislaus Katczinsky, an older soldier, nicknamed Kat, who becomes Paul's mentor. While fighting at the front, Bäumer and his comrades have to engage in frequent battles and endure the treacherous and filthy conditions of trench warfare.
    At the very beginning of the book, Erich Maria Remarque says "This book is to be neither an accusation nor a confession, and least of all an adventure, for death is not an adventure to those who stand face to face with it. It will try simply to tell of a generation of men who, even though they may have escaped (its) shells, were destroyed by the war." The book does not focus on heroic stories of bravery, but rather gives a view of the conditions in which the soldiers find themselves. The monotony between battles, the constant threat of artillery fire and bombardments, the struggle to find food, the lack of training of young recruits (meaning lower chances of survival), and the overarching role of random chance in the lives and deaths of the soldiers are described in detail. They had been forced into the army.
    The battles fought here have no names and seem to have little overall significance, except for the impending possibility of injury or death for Bäumer and his comrades. Only pitifully small pieces of land are gained, about the size of a football field, which are often lost again later. Remarque often refers to the living soldiers as old and dead, emotionally drained and shaken. "We are not youth any longer. We don't want to take the world by storm. We are fleeing from ourselves, from our life. We were eighteen and had begun to love life and the world; and we had to shoot it to pieces."
    Paul's visit on leave to his home highlight the cost of the war on his psyche. The town has not changed since he went off to war; however, he finds that he does "not belong here anymore, it is a foreign world." He feels disconnected from most of the townspeople. His father asks him "stupid and distressing" questions about his war experiences, not understanding "that a man cannot talk of such things." An old schoolmaster lectures him about strategy and advancing to Paris while insisting that Paul and his friends know only their "own little sector" of the war but nothing of the big picture.
    Indeed, the only person he remains connected to is his dying mother, with whom he shares a tender, yet restrained relationship. The night before he is to return from leave, he stays up with her, exchanging small expressions of love and concern for each other. He thinks to himself, "Ah! Mother, Mother! How can it be that I must part from you? Here I sit and there you are lying; we have so much to say, and we shall never say it." In the end, he concludes that he "ought never to have come [home] on leave."
    Paul feels glad to be reunited with his comrades. Soon after, he volunteers to go on a patrol and kills a man for the first time in hand-to-hand combat. He watches the man die, in pain for hours. He feels remorse and asks forgiveness from the man's corpse. He is devastated and later confesses to Kat and Albert, who try to comfort him and reassure him that it is only part of the war. They are then sent on what Paul calls a "good job." They must guard a supply depot in a village that was evacuated due to being shelled too heavily. During this time, the men are able to adequately feed themselves, unlike the near-starvation conditions in the German trenches. In addition, the men enjoy themselves while living off the spoils from the village and officers' luxuries from the supply depot (such as fine cigars). While evacuating the villagers (enemy civilians), Paul and Albert are taken by surprise by artillery fired at the civilian convoy and wounded by a shell. On the train back home, Albert takes a turn for the worse and cannot complete the journey, instead being sent off the train to recuperate in a Catholic hospital. Paul uses a combination of bartering and manipulation to stay by Albert's side. Albert eventually has his leg amputated, while Paul is deemed fit for service and returned to the front.
    By now, the war is nearing its end and the German Army is advancing near Paris. In the final chapter, he comments that peace is coming soon, but he does not see the future as bright and shining with hope. Paul feels that he has no aims or goals left in life and that their generation will be different and misunderstood.
    In October 1918, Paul is finally killed on a remarkably peaceful day. The situation report from the frontline states a simple phrase: "All quiet on the Western Front." Paul's corpse displays a calm expression on its face, "as though almost glad the end had come."

    Themes:
    One of the major themes of the novel is the difficulty of soldiers to revert to civilian life after having experienced extreme combat situations. Remarque comments in the preface that "[This book] will try simply to tell of a generation of men who, even though they may have escaped its shells, were destroyed by the war." This internal destruction can be found as early as the first chapter as Paul comments that, although all the boys are young, their youth has left them. In addition, the massive loss of life and negligible gains from the fighting are constantly emphasized. Soldiers' lives are thrown away by their commanding officers who are stationed comfortably away from the front, ignorant of the daily terrors of the front line.

    Main characters:
    Albert Kropp
    Kropp was in Paul's class at school and is described as the clearest thinker of the group as well as the smallest. Kropp is wounded towards the end of the novel and undergoes a leg amputation. Both he and Bäumer end up spending time in a Catholic hospital together, Bäumer suffering from shrapnel wounds to the leg and arm. Though Kropp initially plans to commit suicide if he requires an amputation, the book suggests he postponed suicide because of the strength of military camaraderie. Kropp and Bäumer part ways when Bäumer is recalled to his regiment after recovering. Paul comments that saying farewell was "very hard, but it is something a soldier learns to deal with."

    Haie Westhus
    Haie is described as being tall and strong, and a peat-digger by profession. Overall, his size and behavior make him seem older than Paul, yet he is the same age as Paul and his school-friends (roughly 19 at the start of the book). Haie, in addition, has a good sense of humor. During combat, he is injured in his back, fatally (Chapter 6)—the resulting wound is large enough for Paul to see Haie's breathing lung when Himmelstoß (Himmelstoss) carries him to safety.

    Fredrich Müller
    Müller is about 18 and a half years of age, one of Bäumer's classmates, when he also joins the German army as a volunteer to go to the war. Carrying his old school books with him to the battlefield, he constantly reminds himself of the importance of learning and education. Even while under enemy fire, he "mutters propositions in physics". He became interested in Kemmerich's boots and inherits them when Kemmerich dies early in the novel. He is killed later in the book after being shot point-blank in the stomach with a "light pistol" (flare gun). As he was dying "quite conscious and in terrible pain", he gave his boots which he inherited from Kemmerich to Paul.

    Stanislaus "Kat" Katczinsky
    Kat has the most positive influence on Paul and his comrades on the battlefield. Katczinsky was a cobbler (shoemaker) in civilian life; he is older than Paul Bäumer and his comrades, about 40 years old, and serves as their leadership figure. He also represents a literary model highlighting the differences between the younger and older soldiers. While the older men have already had a life of professional and personal experience before the war, Bäumer and the men of his age have had little life experience or time for personal growth. Kat is also well known for his ability to scavenge nearly any item needed, especially food. At one point he secures four boxes of lobster. Bäumer describes Kat as possessing a sixth sense. One night, Bäumer along with a group of other soldiers are holed up in a factory with neither rations nor comfortable bedding. Katczinsky leaves for a short while, returning with straw to put over the bare wires of the beds. Later, to feed the hungry men, Kat brings bread, a bag of horse flesh, a lump of fat, a pinch of salt and a pan in which to cook the food. Kat is hit by shrapnel at the end of the story, leaving him with a smashed shin. Paul carries him back to camp on his back, only to discover upon their arrival that a stray splinter had hit Kat in the back of the head and killed him on the way. He is thus the last of Paul's close friends to die in battle. It is Kat's death that eventually makes Bäumer indifferent as to whether he survives the war or not, yet certain that he can face the rest of his life without fear. "Let the months and the years come, they can take nothing from me, they can take nothing more. I am so alone, and so without hope that I can confront them without fear."

    Tjaden
    One of Bäumer's non-schoolmate friends. Before the war, Tjaden was a locksmith. A big eater with a grudge against the former postman-turned corporal Himmelstoß (thanks to his strict "disciplinary actions"), he manages to forgive Himmelstoß later in the book. Throughout the book, Paul frequently remarks on how much of an eater he is, yet somehow manages to stay as "thin as a rake". He appears in the sequel, The Road Back.
    [​IMG]
    Cover of first English language edition. The design is based upon a German war bonds poster by Fritz Erler.

    Minor characters:
    Kantorek
    Kantorek was the schoolmaster of Paul and his friends, including Kropp, Leer, Müller, and Behm. Behaving "in a way that cost [him] nothing," Kantorek is a strong supporter of the war and encourages Bäumer and other students in his class to join the war effort. Among twenty enlistees was Joseph Behm, the first of the class to die in battle. In an example of tragic irony, Behm was the only one who did not want to enter the war. Kantorek is a hypocrite, urging the young men he teaches to fight in the name of patriotism, while not voluntarily enlisting himself. In a twist of fate, Kantorek is later called up as a soldier as well. He very reluctantly joins the ranks of his former students, only to be drilled and taunted by Mittelstädt, one of the students he had earlier persuaded to enlist.

    Peter Leer
    Leer is an intelligent soldier in Bäumer's company, and one of his classmates. He is very popular with women; when he and his comrades meet three French women, he is the first to seduce one of them. Bäumer describes Leer's ability to attract women by saying "Leer is an old hand at the game". In chapter 11, Leer is hit by a shell fragment, which also hits Bertinck. The shrapnel tears open Leer's hip, causing him to bleed to death quickly. His death causes Paul to ask himself, "What use is it to him now that he was such a good mathematician in school?"

    Bertinck
    Lieutenant Bertinck is the leader of Bäumer's company. His men have a great respect for him, and Bertinck has great respect for his men. He permits them to eat the rations of the men that had been killed in action, standing up to the chef Ginger who would only allow them their allotted share. Bertinck is genuinely despondent when he learns that few of his men had survived an engagement. When he and the other characters are trapped in a trench under heavy attack, Bertinck, who has been injured in the firefight, spots a flamethrower team advancing on them. He gets out of cover and takes aim on the flamethrower but misses, and gets hit by enemy fire. With his next shot he kills the flamethrower, and immediately afterwards an enemy shell explodes on his position blowing off his chin. The same explosion also fatally wounds Leer.

    Himmelstoss
    Corporal Himmelstoss (spelled Himmelstoß in some editions) was a postman before enlisting in the war. He is a power-hungry corporal with special contempt for Paul and his friends, taking sadistic pleasure in punishing the minor infractions of his trainees during their basic training in preparation for their deployment. Paul later figures that the training taught by Himmelstoss made them "hard, suspicious, pitiless, and tough" but most importantly it taught them comradeship. However, Bäumer and his comrades have a chance to get back at Himmelstoss because of his punishments, mercilessly whipping him on the night before they board trains to go to the front. Himmelstoss later joins them at the front, revealing himself as a coward who shirks his duties for fear of getting hurt or killed, and pretends to be wounded because of a scratch on his face. Paul Bäumer beats him because of it and when a lieutenant comes along looking for men for a trench charge, Himmelstoss joins and leads the charge. He carries Haie Westhus's body to Bäumer after he is fatally wounded. Matured and repentant through his experiences Himmelstoß later asks for forgiveness from his previous charges. As he becomes the new staff cook, to prove his friendship he secures two pounds of sugar for Bäumer and half a pound of butter for Tjaden.

    Detering
    Detering is a farmer who constantly longs to return to his wife and farm. He is also fond of horses and is angered when he sees them used in combat. He says, "It is of the vilest baseness to use horses in the war," when the group hears several wounded horses writhe and scream for a long time before dying during a bombardment. He tries to shoot them to put them out of their misery, but is stopped by Kat to keep their current position hidden. He is driven to desert when he sees a cherry tree in blossom, which reminds him of home too much and inspires him to leave. He is found by military police and court-martialed, and is never heard from again.

    Josef Hamacher
    Hamacher is a patient at the Catholic hospital where Paul and Albert Kropp are temporarily stationed. He has an intimate knowledge of the workings of the hospital. He also has a "Special Permit," certifying him as sporadically not responsible for his actions due to a head wound, though he is clearly quite sane and exploiting his permit so he can stay in the hospital and away from the war as long as possible.

    Franz Kemmerich
    A young boy of only 19 years. Franz Kemmerich had enlisted in the army for World War I along with his best friend and classmate, Bäumer. Kemmerich is shot in the leg early in the story; his injured leg has to be amputated, and he dies shortly after. In anticipation of Kemmerich's imminent death, Müller was eager to get his boots. While in the hospital, someone steals Kemmerich's watch that he intended to give to his mother, causing him great distress and prompting him to ask about his watch every time his friends visit him in the hospital. Paul later finds the watch and hands it over to Kemmerich's mother, only to lie and say Franz died instantly and painlessly when questioned.

    Joseph Behm
    A student in Paul's class who is described as youthful and overweight. Behm was the only student that was not quickly influenced by Kantorek's patriotism to join the war, but eventually, due to pressure from friends and Kantorek, he joins the war. He is the first of Paul's friends to die. He is blinded in no man's land and believed to be dead by his friends. The next day, when he is seen walking blindly around no-man's-land, it is discovered that he was only unconscious. However, he is killed before he can be rescued.
     
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  4. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    As for the Lord of the Rings, its still very similar to the original, just like Betty boop boop.
    We'll talk about the Great Dictator after WW2
    2)Germany is basically in a position similar to America in the 20's. Germany is improving itself, and its still growing as a super power. America isn't necessarely cut them out, in fact the Americans are actually starting to like the Central powers more that they like the "Entente powers".
     
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  5. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    Any other questions?
     
  6. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    Hope Ottomans retaliated with unrest in africa and southern separatism.
     
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  7. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    1)As a Nintendo fans wonder if Nintendo would exist...as a videogame company or was completely butterfly away? Other would be if we get an Alien or Terminator Equivalent ITTL? Another would be again about japan pop culture too.
    2)The Ottomans timeline was unique, how was the ottmans ideas here?
     
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  8. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    1)I still don't know how to answer that. We'll see it later
    2)For the Ottomans I inspired myself on Italy in WW1. With the Ottomans having lost a war against the Italians literally an year before ww1, I didn't see them eager to work with them. As such, they entered the conflict later.
     
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  9. Threadmarks: The Argentinian coup: the rufous hornero difficult decision

    Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    We're proceding with the Story, but the Question and Answers is not over! Feel free to ask for any other questions. In the maintime:
    The Argentinian coup: the rufous hornero difficult decision
    Argentina was, alongside Chile and Brazil, one of the strongest South American countries, however with the birth of the USSA, Argentina and Chile position started to dicrease. Afraid of becoming a dependency of the USSA, Argentina president Marcelo Torcuato de Alvear decided to fortify its border, create better trade deals with the Central Powers and at the same time trying to maintain a position of supremacy over Chile, its new competetor. This actions were not particurally well seen by the farmers who saw an increase on taxations, and Marcelo "paranoia" would ultimately lead to a coup d'etat on 17 December 1926.
    Other than Marcelo paranoia, the reasons for the coup remain the subject of debate. The domestic situation was definitely troubled; historians have pointed to specific European precedents in the 1920s that may have had an influence, including the 1922 March on Rome by Benito Mussolini in Italy. Other historians have cited more general trends in Europe that resulted in more or less undemocratic governments in the Eastern Mediterranean by the end of the 1930s, but others blame Brazil expansionism. Democratic immaturity was displayed by an unwillingness to compromise, and the frequent shifts of government created a chronic perception of crisis. Historians have also discussed an exaggerated fear of communism as a factor, along with the lack of a stable center that could reach out to parties on the left and right; these parties accused each other of Bolshevism and fascism.
    After several protests in the rural areas, the Marcelo government lifted martial law, restored democratic freedoms, and granted broad amnesty to political prisoners. He also applied for complete modernization, and even planned to invade Chile in order to compete with the USSA. However, the change did not meet with universal approval. Many of the released prisoners were communists who quickly used the new freedoms of speech to organize a protest attended by approximately 400 people in San Miguel de Tucumán on 13 June. The protest was dispersed. The new government's opposition used this protest as the platform for a public attack on the government, alleging that it was allowing illegal organizations to continue their activities freely. Despite its local nature, the incident was presented as a major threat to Argentina and its military; the government was said to be incapable of dealing with this threat.
    Further allegations of "Communizations" were made after Argentina signed the British–Argentinian Non-Aggression Treaty of 28 September 1926. The treaty was conceived by the previous government, which had been dominated by the Radical Civic Union. However, they voted against the treaty, while Hipólito Yrigoyen strongly supported it. On 21 November, a student demonstration against "Communistzation" was forcibly dispersed by the police. About 600 Argentinian students gathered near a communist-led workers' union. The police, fearing armed clashes between the two groups, intervened and attempted to stop the demonstration. Seven police officers were injured and thirteen students were arrested.
    Another public outcry arose when the government, seeking the support of ethnic minorities, allowed the opening of over 80 Italian schools in Argentina. The coalition government directly confronted the Radicalists when it proposed a 1927 budget that reduced salaries to the clergy and subsidies to Catholic schools. Further controversies were created when the government's military reform program was revealed as a careless downsizing. Some 200 conservative military officers were fired. The military began planning the coup.
    [​IMG]
    Anti-British demostrators arrested by the police
    On 20 September 1926, five military officers, led by Juan Perón, organized a committee. Generals Elbio Anaya and Héctor Benigno Varela were among its members. About a month later, another group, the so-called Revolutionary General Headquarters, was formed. The two groups closely coordinated their efforts. By 12 December, the military had already planned detailed actions, investigated the areas where the action was to take place, and informed the leaders of the Argentinain National Union and the Radicalists. Rumors of the plan reached the Social Democrats, but they took no action. Just before the coup, disinformation about movements of the Brazilians army in the Nord was disseminated; its purpose was to induce troops in Gualeguaychú that would potentially have opposed the coup to move towards Buenos Aires.

    [​IMG]
    An image showing Juan Perón
    Late in the evening of 16 December, the British consul informed Marcelo about a possible coup the following night, but Marcelo did not pay much attention to this warning. The coup began on the night of 17 December 1926. The 1927 budget, with its cuts to military and church spending, had not yet been passed. During the night, military forces occupied central military and government offices and arrested officials. General Alberto Guglielmone tried to rally troops against the coup, but was soon overpowered and arrested, and President Marcelo was placed under house arrest. General Juan was proclamed "dictator" of Argentina. His government was recognized by the USA, and some believe that they contribuited for the coup.
    The Argentinian National Union invited the Radicalists to join them in forming a new government that would restore some degree of constitutional legitimacy. The party agreed reluctantly; they were worried about their prestige. Looking toward the near future, the Radicalists reasoned that they could easily win any upcoming elections, regaining power by constitutional means and avoiding direct association with the coup. In keeping with this strategy, they allowed members of the Argentinian National Union to take over the most prominent posts.
    Agreements between the USA and Argentina quickly arrived, in which Argentina was assured that Brazil would not attack them, and would also have protections against the UBSR, both if they invaded and if they tried to convert Argentina. Similar agreements would occur in Chile, much to Argentina annoyance, but they were granted controll over the entirety of the Tierra del Fuego region. In exchange, the USSA ceded some land to the Chileans in Bolivia and Perù. At the same time, both Argentina and Chile joined the American pact.
    upload_2018-7-14_16-1-40.png
    South America after Chile and Argentina entrance in the American Pact
    With disputes in the continent finally over, it seemed like South America can finally prosper, but not only thanks to the USA, but also thanks to the Central Powers.
    I hope you guys like this new update! Be sure to like(if you like it), comment(please comment so I can learn what your opinion is) and.....follow I guess.

     
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  10. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    However, I can say that Japan pop culture will be very different. Just wait until WW2 is over, and you'll see
     
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  11. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    Ummm that show something big will happen to japan...waiting for it
     
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  12. Threadmarks: The Hog Island Incident: the Venezuelan troupial battles the Lion

    Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    The Hog Island Incident: the Venezuelan troupial battles the Lion
    Despite the various successes in South America by the UBSR, many of its former colonies, now "Socialists Republic", desired independence after so long. Many in fact were even fed up by the new government, which was in full controll over the various republics economies. In the Guiana Socialist Republic, the economy was based on agriculture, however the British government had several times performed requisition, which ultimately ended in a famine in 1927, which would ultimately lead to a revolt.
    upload_2018-7-15_9-28-30.png
    Starving children in the Guiana Socialist Republic
    The revolt quickly spreaded in Kumaka, and shortly after a big chunck of the interior of the region was occupied by the rebels. On 23 March 1927, with the rapidly approaching Guianan Rebel Forces (GRF) about to reach Hog island, Guiana leader Cecil Hunter-Rodwell gave orders for his defeated troops to withdraw from the island. Some of his soldiers, who were unable to retreat in time and were probably sympathetic natives, deserted and began to loot properties and attacked two British who were in their way.
    In the early morning of 24 March, the GRF began to enter Hog Island without any resistance from Guiana colonial army. In response, the British navy immediately sent the heavy cruiser HMS Vindictive, the light cruisers HMS Carlisle and Emerald, the minesweeper HMS Petersfield, and the destroyers HMS Witherington, Wolsey, Wishart, Gnat, Veteran, Caradoc, Verity and Wild Swan toward Guiana. The gunboat HMS Aphis arrived toward the end of the engagement, and Cricket was also involved in the naval operations at the time. In the meantime, the Venezuelan government decided to take advance of the situation by supporting the rebels. And that's where the Hog Island incident occurred. On 03:00 A.M., a Venezuelan gunboat fired upon a British gunboat on the tip of Hog Island. The gunboat managed to enter there thanks to the rebellion, and Venezuelan forces even occupied Tiger Island, and the British remained unaware of the action. When the British discovered the action, they ordered the naval bombardment of Puerto La Cruz, while also focusing on the rebellion.
    By the end of March 24, many cities in Guiana were burning and littered with bomb craters and casualties from the battle. Three hours later the bombing of New Ansterdam the Venezuelan attacked again. This time, two ships were in between Wakenaam Island and Leguan island, both of which were occupied by Venezuelan marines. Rifle fire was first heard, and Reginald Tyrwhitt's crew were preparing their machine gun when 3-inch (76 mm) guns at Leguan island suddenly engaged them. Several shots missed the ships, but one eventually hit Reginal's fire control platform, causing no casualties. A 4-inch (100 mm) gun was then aimed at the fort, and after a few rounds the Venezuelan guns were silenced. Meanwhile another British ship was harassed by snipers, but machine gun fire quickly forced the Venezuelan to retreat. Later on the Central Americans sent gunboats to give assistence
    British skimmerish with the Venezuelan occurred in Sierra Imataca, but thanks to Britain better equipment rebel intervention, the battle ended up as a stalemate. However, the British were capable of seizing San José de Amacuro and advanced in the interior, however neither side managed to advance. The British government applied a naval blockade of Venezuela, but the Venezuelans still received support from the USSA and the US, as the British were terrified to have the Americans against them and as such did not attack any American ships.
    [​IMG]
    Venezuelan forces in Leguan island
    More fierce combat occurred in El Dorado, where the British advanced. However they were stop before they could advance further. Shortly after, the Venezuelan commenced an advance in the Nord, conquering Mabaruma. After another naval battle in Margarita island, which was integrated in the US, the American pact threatened to enter at war with the UBSR if peace was not reached. The British and the Venezuelans, tired of a conflict which seemed pointless, accepted. A treaty was signed in Caracas. In it:
    -The UK can occupy San José de Amacuro as a naval base
    -The areas conquered by the British are recognized and integrated
    -The areas conquered by the Venezuelans are recognized and integrated
    -Venezuela joins the American pact
    -Britain pays war reparations
    -Venezuela must wirdraw from the Guiana river islands
    upload_2018-7-15_10-13-24.png
    Map of the region after the Hog island incident
    After the conflict with Venezuela was over, the British reaquired controll over the region in less than a week. Despite being "defeated", the British were not humiliated that much, and even managed to gain some ground. It was obvious that South America was becoming the playground of the US and the UBSR, and that even with the non agression pact, peace did not seem like to remain for that long.
    I hope you guys like this new update! Be sure to like(if you like it), comment(please comment so I can learn what your opinion is) and.....follow I guess.
     
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  13. Redcoat Wanted in 19 different Timelines Banned

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    Long Island
    Interesting seeing the neocolonialism of sorts the communist British are doing.
     
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  14. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    Como, Italy
    South America is the better target up to now.
     
  15. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    It remind me the red British Empire edthomasen do in fight and be right
     
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  16. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    What do you mean?
     
  17. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    That in that timeline, Fight and be Right, the author just make a Red(Communist) British Empire over a revolution post war all thangs Randolph Churchill(Wiston's dad) sucessfully fillibuster british politics to his taste and them things escalated quickly... so yeah capitalist or communist is just an empire with a new paint coat.
     
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  18. Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    Oh, ok. I swear I didn't know about that timeline
     
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  19. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

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    But still follow the idea the british would do their empire...ditto associate republics here.
     
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  20. Threadmarks: The Cambodian massacre: the elephant dark path

    Antonio Ferrari Well-Known Member

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    The Cambodian massacre: the elephant dark path
    After their victory in WW1 and in the third Anglo-Afghan war, Siam had become the strongest nation in South East Asia, and quite possibly a world power. Its new empire raged from India to China, and multiple nationalities lived there in peace. Under King Prajadhipok, better known in the world as Rama VII, was a whise man that decided to treat the new regions not as colonies, but as part of the Kingdom. As such, the inhabitants of the conquered regions had the same rights, and althought Siamese was the main language, secondary languages were respected and kept, even being a big part of Siamese culture. The Siamese often teached in schools both languages, and as a result it was common seying a Siamese from Bangkok speaking fluently Vietnamese or Indian. Religion was not an issue, as long as you obeyed the laws of the country, which were fair, but were not well seen by anarchists and communists, who were considered enemies by the Siameses. Most of the time punishment wasn't severe, some years in prison were believed to be more than enought. However, in Cambodia, one of the bloodiest period of Siam history occurred. In Siamese historiography, the event is occasionally referred to as "April 12 Purge" (12 Mes̄ʹāyn l̂āng k̄ĥxmūl), while the Communist historiography refers to the event in the form of "April 12 Tragedy" (12 Mes̄ʹāyn ṣ̄oknāt̩krrm). Today, it is known as the Cambodian massacre.
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    Victims of the Cambodian massacre. The massacre, despite horrible anyway, should not be considered a genocide, as not all Cambodians were killed
    The roots of the April 12 Incident go back to the Siamese's alliance ratification with the German empire in January 1923. Since the 1890's, the Siamese-German alliance included both financial and military aid and a small but important group of German political and military advisors. However, in the ratification, it was also included that the Siamese must eliminate any sort of Communist feeling in the country. The Siamese agreed, as they did not like the idea of communism taking over, and decided to prohibite the practice of Communism in politics. In Cambodia, a region were Communism was well seen, the decision was quite unpopular.
    Plans for a Communist revolution originated with Tou Ngoc Minh. After his expulsion from politics, by 1920 he had made a military comeback, gaining control of some parts of Cambodia. His goal was to extend his control over all of Cambodia and Southern Vietnam, particularly Phnom Penh. After Tou's death from cancer in March 1927, Cambodian Secret Communist Militia(CSCM) or Puok Kommouynist Kommouynist Samngeat (PKKS) leaders continued to push the plan, and--after convincing a few Cambodian people to rebel(Not many were sypathizer with the communists)--finally launched the Revolution. Initial successes of the Revolution soon saw the CSCM taking controll of Cambodia.
    However, as Siamese reinforcements in the region arrived, a massive counter revolution occurred in the region: the Cambodian people rised up, performing guerrilla fights, performing revolts and even openly attacking the Communists with everything they had. They welcomed the Siamese army as liberators, and many were rewarded with money and land for their contribution in the conflict.
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    Siamese monument in honor to the Cambodian rebels who fought off the communists. The ones who lived were celebrated as heroes in the monument, inculding the ones contributing to the massacre
    On March 21–22 the Siamese launched an offensive in Cambodia, defeating the Communist forces. After the revolution, the Siamese and western powers became alarmed by the growth of Communist influence. With Siam army firmly in control of Cambodia, on April 2 King Rama VII declared the Communists as an enemy of the Siamese, and allowed to purge the Communists.
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    Siamese troops rounding up Communist prisoners for execution, 1927. Not a single Cambodian batted an eye that day
    On April 5 Rama VII arrived in Phnom Penh and met with the Communists leader who surrendered. They would be spared, and could even return to serve in the Siamese military. At the same time, he addressed a speech to the Cambodians, welcoming them to participate the elimination of the Communist forces in exchange of money, land and glory. Many were willing to participate, as they were strong supporters of the King.
    On April 9 Rama VII declared martial law in Cambodia, as many members of the CSCM were still active and causing damages in the regions with terrorist attacks in the centres of power, and were still trying to influence the people, but with limitated success.
    Before dawn on April 12, gang members began to attack areas with strong Communist presence, including Sihanoukville, Kampong Cham and Kampot. Massive massacres in the regions occurred, with the government more often collaborating with the gangs rather than stopping them, To be fair, the government gave them locations of Communist strong points, with several Gangs becoming particurally famous, such as the "Angry Kouprey" (Kamhoeng Khuo Pisei), which claimed the deaths of 200 communists in their purges. They were composed mainly by farmers, and soon all 100 members become rich land owners with siezable farms all over Cambodia, Southern Vietnam and Thailand.
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    Siamese troops marching to help Anti Communists Gangs
    Siamese efforts to stop communism was welcomed by many, especially by the Kingdom of Italy, which despized Communism. On April 22, Italian senator Ettore Conti was sent as an ambassador and adviser for the King regarding the Communist question. Many members of the Blackshirts, a volunteer corp born in Italy to deal with the communists, were sent and helped the Cambodian gangs to clean the area. Despite both of them having similar point of view, the Gangs absolutely hated the Blackshits, often denouncing them to be too violent and attacking innocent civilians rather than the real target. They often raped Cambodian girls and stealed proprietes, with the latter sometimes being practiced by the gangs, but they were not allowed to rape women, nor they did if possible. In fact, many blackshirts were actually arrested, even if the longest period of prison was around 10 days. As a result, King Rama VII requested that the blackshirts returned home before they could start to become unpopular with the Cambodians.
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    Italian senator Ettore Conti
    In less than a month, the communist threat in Cambodia was defeated once for all, but the price was high: 5300 death communists, and 420 farmers during the counter revolution, not to count the soldiers of the CSCM and the innocents civilians killed by the Blackshirts, ammounted for a total of at least 10.000 deaths in Cambodia. It would seem like, despite having the best intentions, not all countries are innocent.
    I hope you guys like this new update! Be sure to like(if you like it), comment(please comment so I can learn what your opinion is) and.....follow I guess.
     
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