The Disney Film Archives (A Shifted Disney Canon)

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Cover.png

A Different Direction: A Changed Media Universe Story
 
Last edited:
Welcome

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
So I have attempted many Disney timelines over the years.
It's very much become my un-climbable mountain.
What's Different this time is I am stripping everything back to the main thing Disney is known for
The Film's
This should help keep the brain focused and pushing forward.
So Join me as we Shuffle the Animated films and some live-action films.
I will be writing them out over the summer and likely posting one a day.
Thank you to @PGSBHurricane for the Idea and

Welcome on Into The Disney Film Archives

 
Chapter One: Finding Nemo (1937)

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Chapter One: Finding Nemo (1937)
Mickey-Rooney-1940.jpg

(Rick Mooney: The Voice Of Nemo)

By The Early 1930s, Disney was becoming a well-known company, having recovered from the issues of the late 1920s. The success of the Mickey Mouse cartoons had reached worldwide, and the series of animated Silly Symphony shorts had further pushed innovation. Around the time the shorts reached new popularity, Walt Disney began considering switching the format. He wanted to produce a full-length feature instead, believing that shorts, while allowing the company to grow, were not enough to garner sufficient profit for further studio expansion. It is also now noted that Disney wanted to explore characters and develop bigger stories, something that shorts hindered.

There were a few possibilities that Disney looked into for the first animated film. This Included a hybrid live-action adaptation of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with Mary Pickford, which went nowhere as Paramount Pictures produced its own film version of Alice at the same time. Other film ideas included Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle and Victor Herbert's Babes in Toyland. In the spring of 1934, Annoyed by an inability to get an existing property to adapt, Disney finally decided on creating his own original tale to tell, which was to be written by Richard Creedon and Ted Sears. In Early June 1934, Disney announced the project to The New York Times, estimating that the film could be produced for a budget of $250,000.

The film that Disney and his studio settled on was Finding Nemo. The First Proper Animated Feature Film. The Film’s plot was simple yet allowed for character development. It followed a father named Marlin (voiced by Roy Atwell) in an unknown European location trying to protect his son (played by Rick Mooney), yet his overprotectiveness leads to the child being kidnapped by a gang of witches led by Dory (voiced by Lucille La Verne). In order to save his son, Marlin sets out on an adventure in which he teams up with a talking bear (voiced by Otis Harlan) and a bumbling bard (voiced by Pinto Colvig). By the end of the film, the adventurers rescue Nemo and defeat the witches. With Nemo Learning to understand his father and Marlin learning to not be so overprotective.

The Film slated the movie, calling it a sinking ship ready to happen, with some going so far as to say the film was nothing but Disney’s foley, which pushed the studio to increase efforts. Walt Disney worked closely on the film, and his brother Roy Disney dealt with the finances. Despite nearing debt as the film neared completion, it was finished and had its premiere on December 21, 1937, at the Carthay Circle Theatre. Six days later, Walt Disney appeared on the cover of Time magazine with Ub Iwerks. The film was a hit. Nemo Fever hit not only America but spread across the world. Altogether, the film hit $418 million at the box office, surpassing the budget and also allowing Finding Nemo to become the highest-grossing sound film at the time.

The Film’s Impact cannot be understated, as it kicked off Disney’s film animation department even as the looming Second World War would soon hurt the studio, finding that Nemo had put them on a strong footing. The film also spawned merchandise, which further helped the studio. Yet despite the love for the film, today it’s viewed as an above-average film. To some, they see the film as boring—a bunch of set pieces with little action. An above-average sequel would eventually follow. Yet despite its flaws, Finding Nemo was just the start for the Disney studio, as it was now proven that animated films could actually work. And as he played with his daughter, Disney was hit with the idea for his second animated feature.
 
So I have attempted many Disney timelines over the years.
It's very much become my un-climbable mountain.
What's Different this time is I am stripping everything back to the main thing Disney is known for
The Film's
This should help keep the brain focused and pushing forward.
So Join me as we Shuffle the Animated films and some live-action films.
I will be writing them out over the summer and likely posting one a day.
Thank you to @PGSBHurricane for the Idea and

Welcome on Into The Disney Film Archives

Really? What other Disney TLs have you tried?
 
Chapter One: Finding Nemo (1937)
Mickey-Rooney-1940.jpg

(Rick Mooney: The Voice Of Nemo)

By The Early 1930s, Disney was becoming a well-known company, having recovered from the issues of the late 1920s. The success of the Mickey Mouse cartoons had reached worldwide, and the series of animated Silly Symphony shorts had further pushed innovation. Around the time the shorts reached new popularity, Walt Disney began considering switching the format. He wanted to produce a full-length feature instead, believing that shorts, while allowing the company to grow, were not enough to garner sufficient profit for further studio expansion. It is also now noted that Disney wanted to explore characters and develop bigger stories, something that shorts hindered.

There were a few possibilities that Disney looked into for the first animated film. This Included a hybrid live-action adaptation of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with Mary Pickford, which went nowhere as Paramount Pictures produced its own film version of Alice at the same time. Other film ideas included Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle and Victor Herbert's Babes in Toyland. In the spring of 1934, Annoyed by an inability to get an existing property to adapt, Disney finally decided on creating his own original tale to tell, which was to be written by Richard Creedon and Ted Sears. In Early June 1934, Disney announced the project to The New York Times, estimating that the film could be produced for a budget of $250,000.

The film that Disney and his studio settled on was Finding Nemo. The First Proper Animated Feature Film. The Film’s plot was simple yet allowed for character development. It followed a father named Marlin (voiced by Roy Atwell) in an unknown European location trying to protect his son (played by Rick Mooney), yet his overprotectiveness leads to the child being kidnapped by a gang of witches led by Dory (voiced by Lucille La Verne). In order to save his son, Marlin sets out on an adventure in which he teams up with a talking bear (voiced by Otis Harlan) and a bumbling bard (voiced by Pinto Colvig). By the end of the film, the adventurers rescue Nemo and defeat the witches. With Nemo Learning to understand his father and Marlin learning to not be so overprotective.

The Film slated the movie, calling it a sinking ship ready to happen, with some going so far as to say the film was nothing but Disney’s foley, which pushed the studio to increase efforts. Walt Disney worked closely on the film, and his brother Roy Disney dealt with the finances. Despite nearing debt as the film neared completion, it was finished and had its premiere on December 21, 1937, at the Carthay Circle Theatre. Six days later, Walt Disney appeared on the cover of Time magazine with Ub Iwerks. The film was a hit. Nemo Fever hit not only America but spread across the world. Altogether, the film hit $418 million at the box office, surpassing the budget and also allowing Finding Nemo to become the highest-grossing sound film at the time.

The Film’s Impact cannot be understated, as it kicked off Disney’s film animation department even as the looming Second World War would soon hurt the studio, finding that Nemo had put them on a strong footing. The film also spawned merchandise, which further helped the studio. Yet despite the love for the film, today it’s viewed as an above-average film. To some, they see the film as boring—a bunch of set pieces with little action. An above-average sequel would eventually follow. Yet despite its flaws, Finding Nemo was just the start for the Disney studio, as it was now proven that animated films could actually work. And as he played with his daughter, Disney was hit with the idea for his second animated feature.
That's great! And now I'm wondering what happens to Pixar when it's time.
 

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Really? What other Disney TLs have you tried?
They Mostly got deleted but my first ever timeline on the site back when I knew very little was one called the greatest showman. Not my best work
After that I attempted a reboot, then another reboot with an even more expanded premise than a Wikibox timeline of that idea.
Each timeline got bigger in scope than the last. Striping this back to the very basics is going to help.
That's great! And now I'm wondering what happens to Pixar when it's time.
Considering what's next in this film canon, it's going to be interesting what the Pixar of this world is going to be.
 
They Mostly got deleted but my first ever timeline on the site back when I knew very little was one called the greatest showman. Not my best work
After that I attempted a reboot, then another reboot with an even more expanded premise than a Wikibox timeline of that idea.
Each timeline got bigger in scope than the last. Striping this back to the very basics is going to help.

Considering what's next in this film canon, it's going to be interesting what the Pixar of this world is going to be.
Cool.
 
Chapter Two: Toy Story (1940)

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Chapter Two: Toy Story (1940)
(The Film's Title Song)
After the success of Finding Nemo. It was inevitable that another animated film would be made. The question was not if, but when, and what story would they tell after the success of finding Nemo? In September 1937, during the production of Finding Nemo, Walt was hit by the idea for the next picture. Well, playing with his daughter, he began to wonder what would happen if the toys were alive, and so the very early iteration of Toy Story was born. Disney soon arrived at the studio full of life, according to Ub Iwerks, and soon commissioned storyboard artists to write a story outline for a toy story. Toy Story was not planned to be the next film; however, it was originally planned to be The Rescuers, but a plot shift due to the Second World War saw Toy Story pushed to the front as the studio reworked The Rescuers.

Since Most of the team who worked on Finding Nemo was working on the sequels, Young and upcoming animator Milt Kahl was appointed to work on Toy Story alongside Ub Iwerks. The Film’s plot was set during the Great Depression, an idea that caused tension in the studio as some feared not enough time had passed for them to make the plot work, but eventually, the idea won out. The film followed a group of classic toys that live harmoniously on store shelves. Among them are Woody, a loyal cowboy doll (voiced by Cliff Edwards), and Buzz (voiced by Charles Judels), a fearless aviator action figure. When the store closes each night, these toys come to life and embark on incredible adventures together. Yet soon, new toys arrive and cause upheaval as a threat descends on the toy store. As the Great Depression casts a shadow over the town, the shop owner faces financial difficulties, and the toy store becomes a target for a heartless businessman who seeks to buy the shop and turn it into a factory. Determined to protect their home and the spirit of the toy store, the toys band together to outwit the businessman and his henchmen. They embark on a daring quest to find a long-lost treasure rumoured to be hidden somewhere in the town. The treasure could save the toy store and ensure their future together.

The script went through many changes before reaching its final version. At first, Woody was going to be revealed as a bad guy, but Disney quickly vetoed the idea. Despite this, Disney was so focused on The Rescuers that most of the film’s major choices instead fell to Ub Iwerks, who stood against the idea that Buzz should be dim-witted. The film was the first to have a dedicated song, written by Paul J. Smith and sung by Frank Sinatra, You've Got a Friend in Me, which would become a hit in its own right. During the production of the film, Disney’s character model department was formed by story artist Joe Grant and was to be responsible for building three-dimensional clay models of the characters in the film.

Toy Story had its premiere at the Centre Theatre in New York City on February 7, 1940. Much anticipation had grown around the film after the success of Finding Nemo. Some wondered if the studio could pull it off twice. To Much fanfare, Toy Story was released in theatres on February 23, 1940. Despite its initial success and high praise for the characters, the film was initially a Box office bomb. The Second World War was tearing through Europe, cutting off a major market for the film. The film would go on to be considered a cult classic, with many favouring Toy Story over Finding Nemo, yet the box office numbers disappointed the studio. It was not until a 1945 reissue that the film finally made a profit. Despite the lack of profit, the film earned the studio its first Academy Award. The Advent of World War II, however, could not be ignored; even as Walt’s gaze turned towards established stories, the Rescuers loomed on the horizon and soon the Second World War began to fully take effect on the studio.
 
Chapter Two: Toy Story (1940)
(The Film's Title Song)

After the success of Finding Nemo. It was inevitable that another animated film would be made. The question was not if, but when, and what story would they tell after the success of finding Nemo? In September 1937, during the production of Finding Nemo, Walt was hit by the idea for the next picture. Well, playing with his daughter, he began to wonder what would happen if the toys were alive, and so the very early iteration of Toy Story was born. Disney soon arrived at the studio full of life, according to Ub Iwerks, and soon commissioned storyboard artists to write a story outline for a toy story. Toy Story was not planned to be the next film; however, it was originally planned to be The Rescuers, but a plot shift due to the Second World War saw Toy Story pushed to the front as the studio reworked The Rescuers.

Since Most of the team who worked on Finding Nemo was working on the sequels, Young and upcoming animator Milt Kahl was appointed to work on Toy Story alongside Ub Iwerks. The Film’s plot was set during the Great Depression, an idea that caused tension in the studio as some feared not enough time had passed for them to make the plot work, but eventually, the idea won out. The film followed a group of classic toys that live harmoniously on store shelves. Among them are Woody, a loyal cowboy doll (voiced by Cliff Edwards), and Buzz (voiced by Charles Judels), a fearless aviator action figure. When the store closes each night, these toys come to life and embark on incredible adventures together. Yet soon, new toys arrive and cause upheaval as a threat descends on the toy store. As the Great Depression casts a shadow over the town, the shop owner faces financial difficulties, and the toy store becomes a target for a heartless businessman who seeks to buy the shop and turn it into a factory. Determined to protect their home and the spirit of the toy store, the toys band together to outwit the businessman and his henchmen. They embark on a daring quest to find a long-lost treasure rumoured to be hidden somewhere in the town. The treasure could save the toy store and ensure their future together.

The script went through many changes before reaching its final version. At first, Woody was going to be revealed as a bad guy, but Disney quickly vetoed the idea. Despite this, Disney was so focused on The Rescuers that most of the film’s major choices instead fell to Ub Iwerks, who stood against the idea that Buzz should be dim-witted. The film was the first to have a dedicated song, written by Paul J. Smith and sung by Frank Sinatra, You've Got a Friend in Me, which would become a hit in its own right. During the production of the film, Disney’s character model department was formed by story artist Joe Grant and was to be responsible for building three-dimensional clay models of the characters in the film.

Toy Story had its premiere at the Centre Theatre in New York City on February 7, 1940. Much anticipation had grown around the film after the success of Finding Nemo. Some wondered if the studio could pull it off twice. To Much fanfare, Toy Story was released in theatres on February 23, 1940. Despite its initial success and high praise for the characters, the film was initially a Box office bomb. The Second World War was tearing through Europe, cutting off a major market for the film. The film would go on to be considered a cult classic, with many favouring Toy Story over Finding Nemo, yet the box office numbers disappointed the studio. It was not until a 1945 reissue that the film finally made a profit. Despite the lack of profit, the film earned the studio its first Academy Award. The Advent of World War II, however, could not be ignored; even as Walt’s gaze turned towards established stories, the Rescuers loomed on the horizon and soon the Second World War began to fully take effect on the studio.
Cool! Pixar's surely gonna be hurting now..........
 
Chapter Three: The Rescuers (1940)

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Chapter Three
The Rescuers (1940)
tumblr_lw7mu7EGj31qetpbso1_1280.jpg

(Early Concept Art)

World War II began in Europe on September 1, 1939. Though at first, this would have little effect on the studios of Hollywood, as the threat of Nazi Germany consumed the continent, a vital market for films was shut off. Yet Many Studios, Disney included, still pushed on with the filmmaking. The true impact of the Second World War would not be felt in America until December 7, 1941. Before then, however, some studios had begun to make war films; nobody had yet made an animated war film. The Idea of an animated film had been considered impossible just a few years prior, but Disney and his studio were ready to push the envelope again and try something new.

Yet the rescuers were not going to be Disney’s first animated war-based film; that honour was going to be bestowed upon the film they were going to release in 1941. Yet things quickly shifted. Disney began to enthral himself with the idea of a fairytale movie being made, and so that movie was shifted forward; the animated war movie was shelved for the time being. This would have an effect on the film, which saw a rapid change. At the start, the plot of the rescuers was to follow two mice who are members of the Rescue Aid Society, an international mouse organisation dedicated to helping abduction victims around the world. This was scrapped, and the film was soon reworked, which would see Toy Story release first instead. The worrying box office results of Toy Story lingered over the team working on the film.

The new Plot still focused on the Rescue Aid Society, which was tasked with rescuing a child from an unnamed island under German occupation. The writers chose to stay away from naming the island, and the word Nazi is only spoken once in the film. Judy Garland joined the voice cast for the first time, alongside Rick Mooney, who returned for his second role. Despite the team’s best efforts, the context behind the film and the fears of war lingering over it made the film much darker than the last two films before it. It was a fear many in the studio shared, but Walt insisted they push on.

Disney hoped the story they were telling plus the music by Deems Taylor as well as the polished animation would help the film at the box office. Others, like Ub Iwerks and Roy O. Disney, voiced their worry, but the film pushed on. The last two were soon proven right. The premiere of the film took place on November 13, 1940, once again in New York. At first, things seemed good, but the lack of overseas income and the reviews quickly soured the mood. The film was lambasted for being too dark for children but too boring for adults, and it was also attacked for being too long. The film was nothing short of a disaster for the studio. Recent evaluations of the film have also seen it labelled as racist, with Disney+ placing a content warning on the film. On a budget of over $2 million, the film earned barely enough to scrape by. Despite all this, the film was important for the studio. It taught them lessons they would take forward, and it taught Walt Disney to listen to his staff. The Future looked grim for the rescuers as the studio quickly moved on to their first fairytale, but with time, a sequel would come to pass.​
 
Glad to see you also doing a Disney TL. I like the idea of shuffling Pixar films into the Disney Canon, wonder what chaos will spawn out of this.
 

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
Glad to see you also doing a Disney TL. I like the idea of shuffling Pixar films into the Disney Canon, wonder what chaos will spawn out of this.
Lots of Chaos. Both live action and none
An OG Animated film doesn't appear till the 2000s
and two ride-based live-action films both pop up before the rides even existed.
 

George-Alexander

Gone Fishin'
I have considered it well working on the last few entries and have decided to say fuck it.
we have chaos already, we may as well add more. So some (but not all) tv movies will be joining the live-action side just to beef it up a bit.
That does very well mean we could end up with a 1950s high school musical when I add them but who knows?
 
I have considered it well working on the last few entries and have decided to say fuck it.
we have chaos already, we may as well add more. So some (but not all) tv movies will be joining the live-action side just to beef it up a bit.
That does very well mean we could end up with a 1950s high school musical when I add them but who knows?
Oh yeah! Things are going to really crazy now!
 
So we might see a 1950s High School Musical, Elemental in the 1980s and Beauty and The Great Mouse Detective as a TV series...
Amazing.
 
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