Part The First
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The Death of Ferdinand: What If The Catholic Monarchs Didn't Come To Power?
Our
story begins, like so many others, on the field of battle in the year of our Lord 1476. This is the battle of Toro, part of the War of The Castilian Succession. Two armies, both alike in dignity and prestige, fight over what they knew to be the fate of all Spain. At their centers were two very powerful men- King Afonso V of Portugal, who fought for his wife and niece, Joanna, the daughter of the late King Henry IV of Castile; his opponent however, was Prince Ferdinand, heir to the Mediterranean power that was the Crown of Aragon. Prince Ferdinand marched to war for the claim of his wife and cousin, Isabella of Castile, sister to the former Castilian King.
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Joanna of Castile before her coronation and Isabella, pretender to the Castilian throne
While they knew that this battle would be important, these men did not know that one of them would die in the process. They had entertained the possibility, of course, but the Prince was young and bold in the way only that young men could truly be. The King, in contrast, was more cautious, but he had brought his son, John, dubbed by many as ‘The Perfect Prince,’ to the battle. Eventually, the two young princes found themselves in a duel. Chroniclers would describe it as a long, grueling battle where the men fought with the fury of crusaders besieging the Holy Land.

And perhaps it was all these things. But in all likelihood, it was a brief skirmish, where Ferdinand, though able to sever Prince John's hand, simply was not the great swordsman he could have been. In John’s blood driven anger, the heir to Aragon was slain, the blood of his head painting the earth red. As the center commander died, the army of the Aragonese combatants dissolved. Prince John, The Perfect no more, still stood triumphant.
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King Francis Phoebus of Navarre-Aragon
When the news of the battle of Toro reached the courts of Aragon, King John II is said to have wept for weeks upon weeks. His only son to reach maturity- slain in duel that should not have happened. He designated his great grandson, Francis Phoebus of Navarre as heir to Aragon. King John then sent a treaty to Lisboa, stating that with the death of Ferdinand, there was no reason for bloodshed, and that he would give Isabella, his candidate for the Castilian throne a choice between a convent and imprisonment, as well as monetary compensation.

King Afonso accepted, and raised his wife to the throne of Castile in 1477. The girl was only 17, whereas King Afonso was well into his forties by then, and already had an heir by his prior wife. However, the new Queen Joanna I would need an heir herself, for John could not inherit the Kingdom he had fought for his stepmother to gain. That the child would have a claim on Portugal was not lost on Prince John as he contemplated the position his father was in now. The Prince knew he was not popular with the nobles of the realm, for he was an honest soul who would strengthen the throne on his ascension given the chance.
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King Afonso V of Portugal, 1432-1481, compare to his wife shown above
King Afonso’s reign became tumultuous as he found himself staying longer and longer in Castile, helping his young wife, with John acting as Regent in Portugal. Most observers pointed out that while the King and Queen were close, the bond was almost wholly platonic, something many a noble and clergyman appreciated. Despite their bond being a platonic thing, in 1479, two years after Queen Joanna I came to power, the eighteen year old was pregnant. The Portuguese and Castilians for a month on end celebrated at the announcement of a new member of house Avis and the security of the throne.
Outside Iberia, King Louis XI of France found himself with an interesting situation. Castile was, generally speaking, one of France’s allies in the west, and the French King had even supported Joanna’s claim, but Portugal had been a friend of England since time immemorial. An Avis Castile would be an unknown- the nobles could influence the child as much as they liked, but eventually they would hold the foreign policy themselves. Were the child a boy, the King may be able to betrothe him to the younger Princess of France, Joan. If Joanna bore a girl, however, Louis found himself at a loss. And Louis XI did not like being at a loss for answers.​

Hello all, I'm KingOnTheEdge, and this is my attempt at a timeline. I tried to do one before, but I was stupid and ignored all logic in favor of 'cool war,' and abandoned it quickly. But this one is different because honestly the Age of Exploration is fascinating and one of my favorite periods in history, and I hope to make a vivid and interesting world for you to enjoy. Let me know your thoughts on this chapter please. As for the PoD? Well, that duel between John and Ferdinand didn't occur otl, and so I could honestly do what I wanted with it.
 

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Super interesting! I will say that Jeanne of France is unlikely to ultimately be married into Castile/Portugal, assuming that this is the same Jeanne of France as OTL.
 
Super interesting! I will say that Jeanne of France is unlikely to ultimately be married into Castile/Portugal, assuming that this is the same Jeanne of France as OTL.
True, given that she's a fair bit older than the baby would be, and became a saint, but Louis XI doesn't know all that stuff
 
Interesting but absolutely ASB who Juana of Aragon can inherit her father’s land when she is the LAST in a long list of female or female line claimants...
Aragon’s legitimate heiress right now is the six years old Isabella (daughter of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile) by right already Queen of Sicily as heiress of her father (and Sicily allowed female succession). Naples would be more interested in her wedding to the future Ferdinand II of Naples (grandson of the reigning King) and maybe to her widowed mother (still heiress of Castile after her niece and her descendant) as new wife for Ferdinand I.
If we go with excluding direct female succession in Aragon then John II’s legitimate heirs are from the line of his elder daughter Eleanor, heiress of Navarre: her eldest son Gaston (husband of Louis XI’s sister Madeleine) is already dead but his son Francis Phoebus (future King of Navarre) is still alive and would rule on both Kingdoms. If Francis still died as OTL then Navarre would go to his sister Catherine as OTL, but Aragon would go to his uncle John (Eleanor‘s third son as the second Pierre was a Cardinal), who was brother-in-law of the Duke of Orléans.
In any case Juana can not inherit anything ahead of her elder half-sister Eleanor of Navarre and Juan II has no interest in doing it as Eleanor was the only one of his children by his first wife to be always loyal to him

Or the crown of Aragon can go to the Duke of Segorbe, who is Juan’s nephew being son of his younger brother...

Again Aragon can go to three person:
1) Isabella of Aragon, Queen of Sicily, male line granddaughter of John II (followed by her father's half-sister Eleanor of Navarre, Princess of Viana)
2) Francis Phoebus of Navarre, son of the eldest son of Eleanor of Navarre, princess of Viana, elder surviving daughter by John II (followed by his father’s brother John of Foix, Viscoun of Narbonne)
3) Henry of Aragon, Duke of Segorbe, male line nephew of John II (last legitimate male of his house as Ferdinand I of Naples was an illegitimate son of Alfonso V of Aragon)

EDIT: also Jeanne of France, Louis XI’s youngest daughter has disabilities, was supposed to be sterile AND was already married to the Duke of Orleans since 1476 (and was engaged to him three years earlier)
 
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I'm still debating having John die and thus Joanna's baby would be the heir of portugal for a union, but I can promise Aragon-Naples will be a power player

It's a shame John would have to die for that, since he was one very good king in terms of legacy, cracking down on the nobility and pushing forward the explorations. But I guess that amputated hand is ripe for getting infected.

Then again, OTL John's children died, which would make Joanna's the heirs. And I guarantee you, should Joanna have a daughter she's getting married to a son of John. In fact, I'd say both Afonso and John and whoever is King of Portugal will try whatever they can to unite the crowns by inheritance.
 
Part The Second
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A questionably rendered painting of Prince Henry of Castile
Queen Joanna of Castile gave birth to a baby boy on November the third, 1480. A proud woman who would never quite get over her anger at having her paternity questioned as it was, Joanna named the boy Henry for his grandfather. The baby’s father, King Afonso V of Portugal wrote immediately to his son, Prince John, for the good news of a healthy deliverance. The King was ecstatic- his dynasty would reign in Castile for at least another generation, his niece (and wife, but given the vast age difference, he hardly thought of her in this fashion) was healthy, and his war with the Aragonese and their pretender was not a pyrrhic victory. Indeed, Prince John hosted a large party the following month in celebration, while this was perhaps unusual, Prince John was Regent for King Afonso, and did not feel it appropriate to travel to Toledo in disregard of his delegated responsibility.

However, not all was ideal. The Emirate of Granada in the south of Iberia had long been rendered vulnerable by the creeping advance of the Reconquista. During the succession war, Granada had launched several small incursions into the realm to her north. However, with the war of succession gone, the Emirate could no longer do this, and were once more expected to pay tribute to Castile. This would not stand to the recently reinstated Emir Abu'l-Hasan Ali ibn Sa'd, and he never sent any tribute toward Toledo- though he insured . In the two years between Joanna’s ascension and Henry’s birth, the young Queen had much more pressing matters, but by the third, she grew tired of this presumption. That he, an infidel far removed from the base of saracen power in the east who was hardly in command of his realm a fraction the size of mighty Castile, would refute her, angered the young Queen greatly. However, her husband, tempered by age as he was, advised against a war at the time.

Across Iberia, Prince John found himself in a difficult position. He was sure his nobles, especially the Duke of Braganza, Fernando II, were plotting his downfall, likely in favor of John’s new half-brother Henry. Some would plot the baby’s death. Some would entrap Braganza- something the Prince-Regent was seriously considering at this point. Prince-Regent John was also contemplating ‘awarding’ the Duke a captaincy and tasking him with an exploratory mission around Africa. However, there were things he could not do as Regent, though certain events would soon empower the young royal.
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Duke Fernando II of Braganza
Time passed as 1480 turned into 1481. King Afonso was, while not quite old at 49, was not as young as he once had been. The strain of conquests on his body were taking their toll. His stress was minor compared to the other issues even the mightiest Kings would endure, but it was undeniably a factor. The King made his way back to Lisboa, where his life and reign had begun. There he would rule in his own right for a few scant months, and died on July 30th, 1481. Portugal mourned Afonso o Africano for years to come.

Prince John was crowned King John II of Portugal in short order, and soon granted his wife and Queen-Consort, Elanor of Viseu Silves e Faro and Terras de Aldeia Galega e Aldeia Gavinha, as was custom for Portuguese queens to receive land. The King was an honest soul, but he was also one who made it clear that his word was law, especially after his father had strengthened the nobility. Thus, he hunted for any excuse to move against Duke Fernando II of Braganza or Diogo of Viseu. He had his chance when letters were intercepted on their way to Aragon, for Fernando was appealing to King Francis Phoebus of Navarre-Aragon. Fernando was promptly executed. John would later summon Diogo to court and stab him to death personally for suspected conspiracy.
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King John in his crown. King at last.
King John was much more exploratory than his father, who had halted the explorations sponsored by Henry the Navigator shortly after the Prince’s death. The King ordered the construction of a fort in west africa, Castile Elmina. The Portuguese were involved in the Guinea area since 1471, and as the trade grew in importance, King John wanted to protect it. There were some issues with the Portuguese wanting to use a stone sacred to the natives, but ultimately the building was constructed by 1482.

The consequences of King Afonso V’s death were not limited to Portugal. Queen Joanna was smarter than her father, Henry IV, but she was still young, and honestly being smarter than him simply wasn’t difficult. Her reign was not easy, however, as she had to repair the disastrous castilian economy that her father had ruined. On her late husband’s recommendation, she had drastically reduced the number of active mints from 150 to a relatively meager 15. This may sound excessive and likely to cause severe deflation, but Henry had expanded the count from 5 to 150. It was also discovered that Henry IV had sold off royal estates at far below proper value in a bid to raise money, reducing the income of the realm. This, Joanna did little about- her husband had convinced the girl to let the nobles be, befitting his laissez-faire management of nobility.
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The Emirate of Granada at the start of the Granada War
However, Joanna was still her own ruler, as well as proud. Afonso never convinced her to abandon war with Granada, but that missed tribute was not the right reason for a war of conquest. When a raid struck the town of Zahara and enslaved many Christians, Joanna was furious and marched to war. Despite the overwhelming difference in power, The Granada War would prove a long affair. Granada received significant monetary support from powers that did not wish to see Castilian power in the Mediterranean Sea rise. The Crown of Aragon provided a sum to pay for a mercenary contingent, while the Ottoman empire provided the Andalusians a supply of guns for little monetary compensation. Due to this support, and the seasonal nature of a medieval campaign, the Granada War would last twelve grueling years.

As the war dragged on into its tenth year, a proposition came to Toledo in 1492. A Genoan, Christopher Columbus, was offering to set sail for Castile. To where would he sail? According to the Italian, he would sail across the Atlantic to China. Quite frankly, Joanna found this proposition as laughable as John II reportedly had in Lisboa. The merchant was quick to pack up his things and head northward to France. There, Charles VIII heard him out.
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Christopher Columbus and his patron, King Charles VIII of France.
Charles was no fool, and felt Columbus was. But Charles was ambitious, and even the chance of direct trade with China was something he could not pass up- it would circumvent the Ottoman Sultanate, the italian city states, and even overland routes that passed through the hapsburg realms. It was agreed- Columbus would depart from Brittany on March 18th the following year, with four ships.

Hey guys. Hope you liked Chapter Two. I kind of feel I should explain some choices.

King John’s reign was basically as OTL so far, but he started about a month earlier and the monarch Fernando II tried to conspire with was actually Isabella I otl. The reason he got so much focus this chapter is two fold- Portugal’s dominance during this period, especially if you mess with Spain much, and since he reigned IRL I was able to do more with it.
Joanna’s reign… didn’t exist, and I can only use free sources for this, which leaves me a scant wikipedia page and the reference log. But given that she’s a teenager, son of what seems to be one of the biggest idiots to ever rule Castile, and she’s replacing one of the better monarchs of the empire, I think I was able to write something reasonable. The Granada War’s extension comes from the fact that without Aragon and Castile in personal union, the Realpolitik that kept Granada around as long as it survived in our timeline is still in play, even if Aragon isn’t likely marching to war so soon after losing her crown prince. The Ottomans sent some guns over basically thinking that Castile wouldn’t likely be able to do much.
And as for that other big thing that happened, I can promise this won’t turn into a France wank. Intentionally. Unless you guys want me to.

Cheers!
 

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Interesting but absolutely ASB who Juana of Aragon can inherit her father’s land when she is the LAST in a long list of female or female line claimants...
Aragon’s legitimate heiress right now is the six years old Isabella (daughter of Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile) by right already Queen of Sicily as heiress of her father (and Sicily allowed female succession). Naples would be more interested in her wedding to the future Ferdinand II of Naples (grandson of the reigning King) and maybe to her widowed mother (still heiress of Castile after her niece and her descendant) as new wife for Ferdinand I.
If we go with excluding direct female succession in Aragon then John II’s legitimate heirs are from the line of his elder daughter Eleanor, heiress of Navarre: her eldest son Gaston (husband of Louis XI’s sister Madeleine) is already dead but his son Francis Phoebus (future King of Navarre) is still alive and would rule on both Kingdoms. If Francis still died as OTL then Navarre would go to his sister Catherine as OTL, but Aragon would go to his uncle John (Eleanor‘s third son as the second Pierre was a Cardinal), who was brother-in-law of the Duke of Orléans.
In any case Juana can not inherit anything ahead of her elder half-sister Eleanor of Navarre and Juan II has no interest in doing it as Eleanor was the only one of his children by his first wife to be always loyal to him

Or the crown of Aragon can go to the Duke of Segorbe, who is Juan’s nephew being son of his younger brother...

Again Aragon can go to three person:
1) Isabella of Aragon, Queen of Sicily, male line granddaughter of John II (followed by her father's half-sister Eleanor of Navarre, Princess of Viana)
2) Francis Phoebus of Navarre, son of the eldest son of Eleanor of Navarre, princess of Viana, elder surviving daughter by John II (followed by his father’s brother John of Foix, Viscoun of Narbonne)
3) Henry of Aragon, Duke of Segorbe, male line nephew of John II (last legitimate male of his house as Ferdinand I of Naples was an illegitimate son of Alfonso V of Aragon)

EDIT: also Jeanne of France, Louis XI’s youngest daughter has disabilities, was supposed to be sterile AND was already married to the Duke of Orleans since 1476 (and was engaged to him three years earlier)
Crap, could've sworn i'd checked everything and their kids were born after. Thanks for the heads up
 
Is Joanna going to remain unmarried? She could definitely use a second marriage especially with just one child. Children can die and even though I imagine you plan to have the boy survive Joanna isn't aware of the plot armor. Could be a good way of re-establishing ties with Aragon. Or to help its rivals if you prefer
 
Part The Third
Columbus departed from Brittany in 1493, eager to prove the world wrong and reach Cathay. His ships were small for the time but amply supplied. His voyage would indeed change the world, but not in any way he anticipated. Nearly three months later, tired and doubting himself, the Geonan’s crew saw land. What would soon be known as the New World. The explorer made landfall and discovered a small settlement. This small settlement had unique dies and woods not seen in Europe- clearly, Columbus was right and he had reached China!
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An artistic rendition of Columbus's landing

The Genoan attempted to trade with them, but he found they understood nothing- not his broken Chinese, his Italian, or his French. The explorers were confused- where was the opulence? The palaces? These simple farmers were nothing like the descriptions from the merchants of the silk road. Perhaps this was the indies? But were they not also home to grand kingdoms? As Columbus explored, he saw a sparkling white stone on the ground. Upon further inspection, it was determined to be quartz- not diamond like the explorers had first hoped. But quartz was still valuable, and this could simply be the beginnings of a land rich in resources.

Columbus named the realm Caroline, for his patron, King Charles VIII of France, and soon began his return home, with the little quartz stones in storage. He soon found himself sailing further north than expected, due to the currents that dominated this side of the Atlantic. But still, he made a discovery here- this place was very similar to Europe, in terms of climate. This place, the Italian named New Brittany, as it reminded him of where he had departed from.

Eventually, Columbus managed to make it to France once more. Charles, for his part, was irate- he had sponsored a trip to China, not an expedition for quartz. Quartz could not fund an invasion of Italy, especially not as few chunks of it as Columbus had brought back. However, Charles would be lying if he said he was not curious about this realm across the sea, or could not see the value of monopolizing a region like this. He told Columbus he would think of how to settle the area, but that Columbus may continue his expeditions.

Christopher Columbus departed again the following year, this time with a few prisoners the mayor of Nantes had offered, as well as the means to construct a small fort and farm so as to better supply the expeditions away from France. It was named Fort Nantes and Columbus acted as governor. It was here that his brutality would be on full display.With the exception of the officers of his vessels, he worked the prisoners as though they were his slaves, and he took many natives for the same purpose in his mad hunt for valuable gems, though these men had attempted raids. This search would yield limited results and some pockets of quartz and even some bits of gold! Columbus, however, was not satisfied. He knew the orient was home to riches beyond compare, and that this was paltry compared to even a fraction of China’s wealth.

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The founding of Fort Nantes, with Columbus's ships in the background

In 1495, Charles VIII had to withdraw from Italy with no substantial gains and significant debt. He had previously regarded Columbus’s expeditions as interesting, but ultimately failures; however, these small lodes of resources could prove indicative, and so Charles sent a few poor families from Paris to Fort Nantes. In the year and a half since the settlement was founded, many of the men- mostly prisoners- had taken wives from the surrounding villages, emphasis on taken. The new families sent from France were also to bring more seed and livestock. While this did help provide food for the colony, enabling some growth, it also started the spread of disease that would decimate the natives of the New World. King Charles also sent Pierre Berger, an advisor to the mayor of Paris, to act as Governor over the colony- King Charles wanted to make sure that this venture was overseen by Frenchmen, not by a lucky Italian.

As Columbus’s settlement grew, the explorer started planning an expedition around this place. He knew of New Brittany up north already, which was similarly sparsely populated by tribes as Caroline was. This meant he had to go south if he wanted to find a proper way to go to China. It was decided that in 1497, two years from now, he would take his vessels as far south as he could. Fort Nantes was recovering nicely from 1494’s terrible winter, with many young children having made it to their first birthday- this gave Columbus some confidence in Fort Nantes.

When Columbus set off in late August 1497, he was careful. These were uncharted water, and if he made one wrong move, he would die a gruesome death of dehydration and scurvy. Or perhaps the natives would kill him. Regardless. He kept the coast insight as he sailed southward. Eventually, however, the land vanished. They were in the open sea in uncharted waters. Columbus’s men wanted to turn back, but Columbus refused. He ordered them to turn west- there was an island chain they could take refuge on if needed. Soon, they found a far, far larger landmass. Columbus ordered landfall. Perhaps this was China as he had calculated, and Caroline had been part of Japan?

The following weeks would disprove that theory quite quickly. Columbus was fascinated. Caroline was clearly north of Joseon and he had found Japan! Surely this was the case. But his expeditions would have to be limited. Columbus turned back and returned to Fort Nantes by December of 1497. If he wanted to explore what he believed to be Japan, he would need more supplies. He would need to wait until Fort Nantes had grown enough for people to be willing to start a new project.

Columbus, unable to explore further south due to the supply, and not able to return as Governor of Fort Nantes due to Berger, returned to France. He was no hero, but Charles VIII gave him a reasonable bounty now that he had come back to Paris. As time went on, Charles found himself more interested in the growth and expansion of Fort Nantes. He sent further resources to the colony. He wanted all the gold he could get into France- and he had debts to pay. Many questioned Charles’s rationale in spending money finding trace amounts of gold in order to pay those debts, but Charles had more riding on this settlement than gold or even money. Like Columbus, to Charles Fort Nantes was a second priority to the real goal- finding and trading with China without enriching the Ottomans, or in Charles’s case especially, the Italian City-States and the Hapsburgs, who dominated the Mediterranean sea and the overland routes respectively. But after his failures in Italy, Charles also wanted to leave a legacy- if he and his sponsored explorers were able to change the world by discovering a way to China, surely the chroncilors would forget about a failed incursion into a now irrelevant Italy, wouldn’t they?

Across the English Channel, King Henry VII was looking for a woman to marry his son, Arthur Tudor to. But he had an idea he was hopeful for. He sent a letter to King John of the Kalmar Union between Denmark, Norway, and Sweden; Henry was hoping to betrothe Arthur and the Danish princess Elizabeth. King John was quick to accept- previously he had been entertaining a marriage into the Electorate of Brandenburg, but while limiting the Hansa could be done through other means, the north sea opportunity this gave could be even greater and much harder to counteract. He approved the marriage with some glee.

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Elizabeth, Princess of the Kalmar Union

After the death of Afonso, Joanna I of Castile had eventually arranged a marriage to Francisco Fernández de la Cueva, 2nd Duke of Alburquerque, whose wife had passed the winter of 1483. Francisco is noted for having raised Prince Henry as though he was the boy’s own father, having helped cultivate an ambition and intelligence in the boy. As Henry had made it to 17 and Joanna was in her forties, it was becoming ever more likely he would inherit the crown of Castile, and had a strong claim to Portugal. Unfortunately, John’s son Afonso stood in the way, and while Henry was cunning, moving against his own cousin, a man he had grown up admiring, would be a new level he was unsure about crossing.

Francisco and Joanna had children of their own- Prince John of Castile, heir to Albuquerque, and Joanna, named for her mother. John was only 12, but he showed much the same intellect as his half-brother, but he was kinder, and while he had a political inclination, he was much more dedicated as a pious boy and servant of God than Henry- not that Henry was unpious, but he placed political moves far above God. Joanna was 14 years old, between the half-brothers, and most would say she was much more similar to Henry than she was John. She was ambitious, often urging Henry that when he took power, he should press his claim to Portugal. But she was still young, and had innocence about the way the world worked, often asking why nobles would go against their rightful King or Queen, or why God did things the way he did.

Charles VIII died in 1498, succeeded by his cousin, Louis XII. King Louis XII was frugal, and so that July, along with the yearly shipment of supplies to Fort Nantes, sent notice to Pierre Berger, still acting Governor, that this would be the last of such supply sent by the crown until greater returns were seen. Berger, understandably, was concerned. While the settlement had grown nicely in the last five years, it was still small. Desperate, he sent another expedition down south. This expedition would prove to be of great importance. However, it was first regarded as a failure, not returning until the coming January.

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King Louis XII of France

The reason for this was simple. A series of storms ravaged the expedition during August and September. These storms ensured that the expedition would be as cautious as possible during late September and most of October. They made brief rests in what they discovered was not Japan. During late October, they set sail once more, going southward. It was here that they discovered something amazing. Advanced civilizations with stone cities and gridded streets. Beyond that the cities they saw were simply beautiful. One explorer said it put Paris to shame. And when the explorers realized how much gold the natives wove into the cities, they were overjoyed. This could win them greater support from the King!

The exploration turned back toward Fort Nantes and told them of the kingdoms to their south. While the more aggressive members of the village- mostly the prisoners Columbus had brought- wanted conquest, Berger knew they would get destroyed and the loss of men would reduce agriculture to untenable amounts. Best to establish trade for this gold until King Louis XII was convinced of the colony’s value. But what to trade? Berger eventually settled on some guns, as the explorers indicated that the natives did not possess any firearms. And so it was settled, a trade expedition was sent out, hoping to get guns for gold in what the colonies tentatively called Cathay.

The expedition set out in November, after those horrendous storms subsided, and sought to trade. After a demonstration or two, the king of the settlements seemed to agree- the Frenchmen would give him guns and the necessary equipment to use them, and they could take some gold. Seemed, being the operative word, as this language was different than the ones the settlers had translated in Caroline. When the traders returned to Fort Nantes, they believed they had begun a prosperous trade relationship- at least until Louis XII almost certainly sent an army to conquer the area- but in reality, they had started something far more violent. The chiefdom, which they understood as Can Pech, started a campaign of conquest across the upper Maya Peninsula with the guns gained from the european merchant. Many of them had been rendered diseased when they had encountered the Europeans, but did not show it yet.

The Conquest of The New World had begun, not with the bang of a rifle, but with a cough of a diseased warrior.

Hey guys. This is the first chapter to be entirely butterflies, so what do you think? And yeah, I realized after all that stuff about Fort Nantes that I couldn’t cut that between Henry being born in 1480 and Charles hiring Columbus for 1493 and the 4 years in the settlement, that I’d skipped to him being 17. So uh, sorry if you were hoping to see him grow up. Hopefully I’ll be able to slow the timescale down some in the next chapter.
 
Nice! So, what's going on with the Habsburgs ITTL? Could we still see a double match with the Iberian peninsula?

Also, the poor French colonies will almost certainly be worse off under Louis XII. But this is interesting...could we potentially see large scale French settler colonialism in the Americas ITTL?
 
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Nice! So, what's going on with the Habsburgs ITTL? Could we still see a double match with the Iberian peninsula?
The Habsburgs are in for a rough ride, given that they no longer have any chance of ruling Spain, at least during this generation when the ottomans are scary as hell. But a Castilian/Portuguese union is still on the table, if that's what you're asking (and if not, i'm sorry- always a little frayed after i post updates simply because of the research and writing working best when i do them at once)
 
The Habsburgs are in for a rough ride, given that they no longer have any chance of ruling Spain, at least during this generation when the ottomans are scary as hell. But a Castilian/Portuguese union is still on the table, if that's what you're asking (and if not, i'm sorry- always a little frayed after i post updates simply because of the research and writing working best when i do them at once)
It's cool! I was mostly asking as to whether we'll see a Habsburg-Trastámara match ITTL. Infante Henry would be the right age to marry OTL Margaret of Austria. But maybe there's a Portuguese infanta available?
 
It's cool! I was mostly asking as to whether we'll see a Habsburg-Trastámara match ITTL. Infante Henry would be the right age to marry OTL Margaret of Austria. But maybe there's a Portuguese infanta available?
OH. Well, Aragon is certainly a possibility, given the Hapsburg-French rivalry and the Aragonese-French rivalry are both prominent. But I'm going to have to do some digging to figure out how that will work.

As for this question
Also, the poor French colonies will almost certainly be worse off under Louis XII. But this is interesting...could we potentially see large scale French settler colonialism in the Americas ITTL?
The gulf of mexico is almost certainly going to be part of the Baguette Empire, but given the population of the mexican valleys and the climate of the south and caribbean, idk if settler colonialism is the right term. More sso than otl's 'forts with trade' they did, but frenchmen won't be the majority too often. But I can promise that they'll use the mexican money far better than the spanish otl, meaning the french empire as a whole will be bigger.
 
Hey guys, sorry this isn't an update, butI was hoping you could help with something- finding Henry a wife? like @curlyhairedhippie said, Margaret of Austria is an option, but I'd like to have a few more choices before i commit, ya know?
 
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