The flag looks really nice, the only concern I'd have is that the outlined star may be hard to make out at a distance/low resolution.
Everything else looks pretty good too, I can't really think of anything to change there.
 

Bogdanoff

Banned
@Višeslav , @Bennett , @mikroraptor

Whatever, I made it anyway:

View attachment 501959

Some observations on the map:

I’m not sure if Luxembourg and Wettin Elsass-Lothringen will be a part of this Germany yet, so I didn’t include them. I don’t think we agreed on Luxembourg being a part of it or not, but IIRC, Wettin E-L will be after the next war.

I remade Galicia with the original border and not that monster I created.

Germany possesses, through Prussia, a notable exclave in Neuchatel.

I tried to make the Republican Provinces as realistically as I could. However, I’m hoping for suggestions regarding them. Smaller, larger, more, less? I can easily edit the map and I’m not that attached to them.

I’ve got a list of names and capitals for the Republican Provinces, but I don’t think that will be necessary until we define with more precision which will be the provinces. I have several proposals for them.

By the way, Thüringen’s provinces are just me lumping together some of the micro-states in the area and separating them by the largest cities in current Germany (I distrust me in this so please correct me if I’m wrong).

I tried to eliminate as many enclaves and exclaves as I could since I think the republican government would try to simplify things and to get rid of as much of the legacy of the HRE as possible while at the same time deriving some legitimacy from it. There are some enclaves remining though. Mainly those of the Kingdoms that didn’t grant entire states to the republicans (aka, everyone but Prussia).

I can easily edit those enclaves out with or without compensation by the same amount of area to the original owners.

I also have several proposals if we want to break down the Prussian Provinces/States (I don’t recall what they were called exactly, sorry) both into smaller ones inside the Kingdom as the population grows and outside it as the Kingdom is finally abolished and the Republican system takes over (with a ceremonial monarch of course).

I got two suggestions about connectivity between some areas:

1.- The first one is to grant the Bavarian Palatinate to the republican government.

2.- The second one is a much smaller one and consists on making a small corridor to connect the republican provinces of Mecklenburg to the republican provinces of Anhalt.

Prussia rearranged the borders of the Provinces of Brandenburg and Schlesien to add slightly more territory to them in detriment of the Province of Saxony and Anhalt, which was then turned to the republican government.

Posen/Poznan Province is part of the republican government but also more autonomous. I left it that way so we could later change its fate more easily, for example, if it wanted to abandon the union and be part of a future Polish State.
Polish Galicia should be divided into at least 2 governates, more likely 3-also the one including Lvov should not be part of ITTL's congress Poland as it was one of the core historical Russian lands: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingdom_of_Galicia–Volhynia
 
A recent post in the soviet victory thread reminded me of something I've been meaning to do. I wanted to flesh out the dialect of English spoken in Plate/Plata. I assume it would have a degree of Spanish influence. Like in Falklands English, I think the use of Camp (from Campo) for the countryside makes sense, and I feel the word Che (maybe spelled Chay) would also find its way into Platine English (it was already fairly common in the region in the early 1800s albeit not how it is used today, by the end of the century it was used in books) either used as an interjection like so or right, like it is in Argentina today (so like, "I was at the pubb, right?" becomes "I was at'te pub, chay?") or being used in a way closer to the literal meaning, like it is in the Falklands and was used in Argentina earlier OTL where it means something like mate or bro or dude, so "How'sit chay?", "He's a right proper chay" or "I was out with me chays" or whatever. I personally prefer the second one.

I feel they would take Rioplatine Spanish words for horse colors.

There would likely be some semi-derogatory term for Hispanophones and Anglophones, what might it be or derive from?

Any other Spanish terms that you think might find their way into this dialect? Other words or changes? English speakers in the southern hemisphere often use G'day (Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the Falklands), not sure if that would be a big thing OTL. I expect a major immigrant group could significantly impact the language as well so I might need to wait with this.

If I'm looking too far ahead with this, please tell me. Honestly this might be a complete waste of time. Also, @Fox-Fire @Entrerriano (you're the south America experts, right?) any ideas about what is going on in the southern cone in the mid 1800s or are you busy with other things? I expect those conflicting claims on Patagonia and the chaco region might cause some trouble.
 
I wanted to flesh out the dialect of English spoken in Plate/Plata. I assume it would have a degree of Spanish influence. Like in Falklands English, I think the use of Camp (from Campo) for the countryside makes sense, and I feel the word Che (maybe spelled Chay) would also find its way into Platine English (it was already fairly common in the region in the early 1800s albeit not how it is used today, by the end of the century it was used in books) either used as an interjection like so or right, like it is in Argentina today (so like, "I was at the pubb, right?" becomes "I was at'te pub, chay?") or being used in a way closer to the literal meaning, like it is in the Falklands and was used in Argentina earlier OTL where it means something like mate or bro or dude, so "How'sit chay?", "He's a right proper chay" or "I was out with me chays" or whatever. I personally prefer the second one.

I feel they would take Rioplatine Spanish words for horse colors.

There would likely be some semi-derogatory term for Hispanophones and Anglophones, what might it be or derive from?
Maybe base it off of this creole language? Most of its aspects are derived from either English or Spanish (73% English and 17% Spanish), and as such it probably would work well as an anchor for this Platenese Creole. Gringo would probably still be used as an insult for Anglophones (it goes as far back as the 1780s), though what Anglos would call Hispanophones isn't something I can think of just yet.
 
A recent post in the soviet victory thread reminded me of something I've been meaning to do. I wanted to flesh out the dialect of English spoken in Plate/Plata. I assume it would have a degree of Spanish influence. Like in Falklands English, I think the use of Camp (from Campo) for the countryside makes sense, and I feel the word Che (maybe spelled Chay) would also find its way into Platine English (it was already fairly common in the region in the early 1800s albeit not how it is used today, by the end of the century it was used in books) either used as an interjection like so or right, like it is in Argentina today (so like, "I was at the pubb, right?" becomes "I was at'te pub, chay?") or being used in a way closer to the literal meaning, like it is in the Falklands and was used in Argentina earlier OTL where it means something like mate or bro or dude, so "How'sit chay?", "He's a right proper chay" or "I was out with me chays" or whatever. I personally prefer the second one.

I feel they would take Rioplatine Spanish words for horse colors.

There would likely be some semi-derogatory term for Hispanophones and Anglophones, what might it be or derive from?

Any other Spanish terms that you think might find their way into this dialect? Other words or changes? English speakers in the southern hemisphere often use G'day (Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the Falklands), not sure if that would be a big thing OTL. I expect a major immigrant group could significantly impact the language as well so I might need to wait with this.

If I'm looking too far ahead with this, please tell me. Honestly this might be a complete waste of time. Also, @Fox-Fire @Entrerriano (you're the south America experts, right?) any ideas about what is going on in the southern cone in the mid 1800s or are you busy with other things? I expect those conflicting claims on Patagonia and the chaco region might cause some trouble.
Ok so, here in Argentina, "che" is used as a synonym of "hey". It's basically a way of calling someone's attention. I have absolutely no idea of Falklanders using Rioplatense Spanish loanwords honestly. Anyway, I don't know much about old Ripolatense Spanish, since a lot of common words are actually of Italian origin here.

Regarding what's going on in the mid 1800s, haven't thought about it yet, mostly because I was originally waiting to see what happens in Europe.
 
Ok so, here in Argentina, "che" is used as a synonym of "hey". It's basically a way of calling someone's attention. I have absolutely no idea of Falklanders using Rioplatense Spanish loanwords honestly. Anyway, I don't know much about old Ripolatense Spanish, since a lot of common words are actually of Italian origin here.

Regarding what's going on in the mid 1800s, haven't thought about it yet, mostly because I was originally waiting to see what happens in Europe.
Ah ok, thanks for the explanation. My knowledge of the word Che is just from English language sources so an Argentine explaining it is good. Waiting to see what happens in Europe seems smart. I probably won't get my Germany stuff done soon though, sorry.

Maybe base it off of this creole language? Most of its aspects are derived from either English or Spanish (73% English and 17% Spanish), and as such it probably would work well as an anchor for this Platenese Creole. Gringo would probably still be used as an insult for Anglophones (it goes as far back as the 1780s), though what Anglos would call Hispanophones isn't something I can think of just yet.
This seems interesting. I doubt that much grammar will be borrowed though, so I expect it to be more like English with Spanish loanwords rather than a true creole language but I'll look at the San Andrés–Providencia Creole's vocabulary and there might be one or two grammatical changes (depends on the Anglo poulation) so this could help. Gringo makes sense.

Sorry if this reads like incoherent rambling, I'm in a hurry.
 
Unrelated to America, but how does this map look as a version of the ‘divided France’ thing?
To be honest, the map itself was an unrealistic proposal in any capacity. Napoleon brought French nationalism to ahead and that wouldn't go away. Directly occupying huge swaths of France would solve nothing in terms of peace.
 
So I've begun work on the German Unification bits. I'm doing it in the form of a Platian history textbook. (WHS4 is a course code, World History Secondary 4, so a 12th grade/Senior Year of high school history course). The background stuff on the first page doesn't give much information that needs editing, I'm more interested in what you think of the style. It heavily borrows from this graphic from a Thousand Week Reich, though I will be making 2 different page layouts to go along with this image-heavy one (one with mostly text and one with only text).



What I need feedback on is the format, the images, and similar things.
For the next 2 pages, I intend to do one text-heavy one focusing on the balance of power in pre revolutionary Germany, and another Image-Heavy one showing the different plans for German Unification (so Größedeutschland vs Kleindeutschland), and then I'll finally get to the actual war.

Doe that plan sound ok?

[edit: I'm also getting rid of the internal borders on the small map, this image is still a WIP]
 
I've suddenly become very interested in the Plate colony. When I finish working on German Unification, I might do some stuff there (I'm not sure if that fits into my previous plan, but hey, who cares).

One thing I realized is that the term "Dominion" for semi-independent states in the British Empire wouldn't exist ITTL. It was invented by Canadians in the context of Canada having "Dominion form Sea to Sea and from the River to the Ends of the Earth". A bible verse that roughly summed up Canada's territorial ambitions to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the St. Lawrence to the North Pole inspired the term. Without that situation, we would end up with a different term. Likely Commonwealth, as in "The Commonwealth of Australia", which evolved separately but was used in more or less the same way. Free State is also a possibility.

I am assuming the Britain would still have something resembling dominions, as they do have many large, white Anglophone majority colonies all around the world that they would have trouble governing dirrectly and trust to govern themselves.

What do you think about all of this?
 
I've suddenly become very interested in the Plate colony. When I finish working on German Unification, I might do some stuff there (I'm not sure if that fits into my previous plan, but hey, who cares).

One thing I realized is that the term "Dominion" for semi-independent states in the British Empire wouldn't exist ITTL. It was invented by Canadians in the context of Canada having "Dominion form Sea to Sea and from the River to the Ends of the Earth". A bible verse that roughly summed up Canada's territorial ambitions to expand from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the St. Lawrence to the North Pole inspired the term. Without that situation, we would end up with a different term. Likely Commonwealth, as in "The Commonwealth of Australia", which evolved separately but was used in more or less the same way. Free State is also a possibility.

I am assuming the Britain would still have something resembling dominions, as they do have many large, white Anglophone majority colonies all around the world that they would have trouble governing dirrectly and trust to govern themselves.

What do you think about all of this?
Oh fuck I need to continue my Argentina loremaking.
Also I hadn't thought about the origin of Dominion, but it makes sense.
 
Oh fuck I need to continue my Argentina loremaking.
There's no pressure. Do it when you want to and are able to.

When you do get around to it, I'd imagine that there would be a few wars between the British River Plate Colony and the neighboring Hispanic states (maybe collectively known as the Platine Wars) and fighting between the Argentine republics and Chile, as, if I remember correctly, they have all kinds of overlapping claims. At this point I'd imagine Britain would relinquish some of its Patagonian claims in exchange for an alliance with Chile.

Of course, most of this is just me trying to remember and summarize previous discussions, I'll leave most of it up to you as the expert on the Southern Cone.

I'd go with either Commonwealth or Union, as in the Union of South Africa
I agree that Commonwealth is better/more plausible and fitting than Free State.

Union is a valid idea, though I think it applies better to South Africa due to its federal nature (a union between the 2 Boer republics and the British colonies), whereas a commonwealth (a community working for the common good) is more generally applicable, but, depending on how its history goes, Union might fit well with Plata.
 
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