The Cold-Hearted Swot

Opening Post; and Edward VI
The Cold-Hearted Swot
or... What if Edward VI had lived twice as long
1200px-Tudor_rose.svg.png

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A Foreword
Hi, to some people this TL might already be known, and for them my only declaration is that I've finally decided to make a thread for this thing instead of holding it on the Infoboxes, Alternate Monarchs/Lineages and Maps threads, and that they'll notice that I have done some updating and revisioning of some aspects of the TL itself (which I am grateful to @Kellan Sullivan for, we may have started in a rather rocky situation but I'm truly floored and immensely grateful for your help in not only revising the genealogy of the earlier generations but in a major way reviving the TL for me).
And for those curious about the name, it comes from a line on the threat "List of Monarchs III" that I started with the same premise as this TL back in July 2020, with credit going to (I think) @Premier Taylerov for adding the name to it (which got lodged into my brain as a perfect one for this TL)

Finally, for those who have no idea what's this, "The Cold-Hearted Swot" is a TL that I sort-of-started in the middle of July, 2020, with a bundle of infoboxes without any writing on them, and that I posted about through the later half of that year.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Premise

Although a compelling argument can be most certainly made that the POD was a while before that, the specific premise of this TL is that Edward VI (the eponymous "Cold-Hearted Swot"), instead of dying at age 15 in 1553 from what was probably tuberculosis*, lived until the ripe old age of 31 as a sickly man, marrying Jane Grey and having children who continued, through a way or another, the Tudor Dynasty, resulting on a completely changed world by the timeline's present.
For those wondering, the date that is used as the "present" for this timeline is January 1st, 2031, (or a full decade later than the date used in the original)

*For the context of the TL, Edward VI contracted tuberculosis (often called "consumption" even in modern times ITTL) in 1553 after fighting a bout of both measles and smallpox the year before which weakened him to the point of being incapable of fighting the disease (other theories I have seen say he died of acute bronchopneumonia, which that led to lung abscess, septicemia and kidney failure, or that he was poisoned), with the idea here being that, through sheer dumb luck (and possibly a lack of poisoning in an attempt to hasten death), his immune system, instead of giving in, shouldered on for the good part of two decades.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
and now, The Cold Hearted Swot himself, Edward the Sixth
1640710808832.png

Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 16 July 1569) was King of England and Ireland[1] from 28 January 1547 until his death in 1569, being crowned on 20 February 1547 at the age of nine. Edward was the son of Henry VIII by his third wife, Jane Seymour, being his only surviving legitimate son, and England and Ireland's first monarch to be raised as a Protestant. He is held by most Brittanic Churches as one of the "Royal Saints of the Isles", being traditionally commemorated on 30 January.

Born to his father after decades of Henry VIII hungering for a male heir, although his mother only lived for a week following her son's christening, Edward VI was at birth and on his early years a remarkably healthy and strong child, although with a generally poor eyesight and surviving a bout of malaria at age four. Although remembered in modern times as sickly all his life, Edward only came to be so in 1553 when, after having contracted measles and smallpox the year before, he became ill with consumption and nearly died during a year-long war against the disease, and, although recovering, Edward VI was permanently affected by the illness, being often bedridden during the second half of his life.

A child when he ascended to the throne, a regency council was supposed to govern the realm from 1547 until Edward's majority in 1553, being first led by the king's maternal uncle, Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (1547-1549), and then by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick (later made Duke of Northumberland in 1551), but Edward VI's drawn-out fight with consumption through what was supposed to be the regency's last year meant that it was de facto extended until the beginnings of 1555.
Although the regency years are often remembered for their economic problems and social and religious unrest, which erupted into riot and rebellion in 1549, as well as by an expensive war with Scotland (which saw the loss of Boulogne-Sur-Mer for England and a total withdrawal from Scotland), and are characterized by scheming and power-grabbing by regents and councilmembers, modern historians now prefer to take a more moderate approach to those years, seeing them as instead being divided by the disastrous "Somerset Protectorate" while Northumberland's tenure is often seen as being, while not prosperous, a general return to normalcy and peace.

The Northumberland Regency was, though, in a way marred by not only Edward VI's near death but by two scandals involving the personal lives of both the Royal Family and Northumberland's. The first was when the king's middle sister, then simply "The Lady Elizabeth", gave birth in middle 1552 to a son – named Edward in his uncle's honor – and, when asked who had fathered her "bastard", revealed that the child was, in fact, born in wedlock, and that she had eloped[2] with Lord Robert Dudley, Northumberland's fifth son.
Although the scandal resulted on the couple's temporary banishment to Ireland, Northumberland himself survived it relatively unscathed (Edward recognized the duke's lack of involvement, and would soon-enough himself forgive his sister and brother-in-law for the entire affair), and after that the next one came only in 1554, when, still bedridden but relatively safe from death, Edward VI married his paternal first cousin once removed, Lady Jane Grey, heiress suo jure of the Dukedom of Suffolk.[3]
Now, if the marriage was simply that, a scandal would most certainly not have happened, and, instead, the scandal came from the fact that not only Edward VI himself was betrothed to a French princess[4], which would result on a minor "staring contested" between them and England, but Jane herself was also betrothed, in this case to Northumberland's second-youngest son, Guilford, who, as a companion and friend of the king, was actually one of the witnesses of the marriage, performed by Thomas Cranmer.
Many historians believe that Edward himself had long been in love with his cousin, with whom he had been in some level of friendship since childhood, and that those feelings had been equally requited by Jane, but that until his near-death experience the king had resigned himself to never act upon them due to their obligations as king and heiress, with his brush with death causing Edward to decide on following on his father's footsteps and marry the woman he desired to be with.
When compared to Henry VIII and his own marital life, though, Edward VI had a much happier and successful one, with him and Jane remaining together until his death and having six children, five of whom survived to adulthood. His only known extramarital affair, had with Lady Lettice Knollys[5] from late 1560 to early 1564, was in a major part sprouted from the fact that the birth of the future Henry IX in 1560 nearly killed the queen and caused Edward to refrain from bedding her for the following few years, with Lettice herself being only chosen as a mistress due to her being one of the queen's closest ladies-in-waiting, one of her friends, and almost uncomfortably outspoken of her fervent loyalty to her.

Although of a fascination over the military arts, in that area Edward VI focused inward, and invested in the development of England’s defenses instead of in entering foreign endeavors or satiating foreign ambitions, believing them to have too great of a chance of being either disastrous or pyrrhic to even try, and while his father founded the Royal Navy and his wife and children made it a true strength, he is credited with fortifying the shores of England from outside invasions.
Edward VI also has as part of his legacy the defenses of the Pale of Calais, who, ironically, he was not quiet about considering an economic burden so great that it often outshined any kind of economic advantage it granted England, with many believing that the main reason behind his investment in the pale’s defense was the fact that Edward VI hoped to make it less of a nuisance to protect by making it a greater nuisance to even attack. Although much of the Pale’s fortifications were destroyed by the Conquest in 1884, their ruins and the memories of the Last Siege of Calais serve as a permanent reminder of Edward VI’s work there.

In Ireland Edward VI’s reign is mainly remembered for the actions of his sister, Elizabeth, who, even before her “pardon” in September of 1553, decided to make herself into a diplomat and middle-man between her brother and the various de facto independent lords and princes of Ireland, using her unique sort of Tudor charisma to ingrain herself among the local aristocracy, establishing a foundation to the true entrance of the remaining uncontrolled parts of the island into the Kingdom of Ireland later in the 16th century. Although it was only many years after his death, Elizabeth became Edward’s de facto deputy in Dublin by the end of the 1550s, and would work with him also in expanding Protestantism through Ireland, which was still firmly of a Catholic majority.

And it is on the area of religion that Edward VI is most remembered for, as he not only was the first of England and Ireland’s monarchs to be raised a true Protestant, but it was he who reigned over the real turn of England to Protestantism. Under Henry VIII, the Church of England, while severed from Rome, had never renounced Catholic doctrine or ceremony, with it being under Edward VI that it transformed into a recognizably protestant body.
Interestingly, though, while many of those reforms were established early into Edward’s reign, in special during the Duke of Somerset’s protectorate, it was during the course of the following two decades that those reforms settled in with the population, gained new companions, or were changed in part due to the King’s own changing views on religion.
Edward VI himself was a rather unrelenting individual in relation to religion, and, while he did take some interestingly compensatory turns, in relation to desecrated or destroyed religious buildings and institution, Edward VI is still remembered for his dedication to stamping out Catholicism in England, which saw the Brother’s Revolt and Burning of East Anglia in the 1560s.
In Cornwall and Wales Edward also used of propaganda and indoctrination in his attempts to sway the local populations to Protestantism, although many also credit his wife with the idea, and as part of that endeavor he commissioned official translations of the Bible, and later the Book of Common Prayer, to Cornish and Welsh.
In Ireland, as mentioned before, Edward VI, is remembered for his work with his sister in spreading the reformation, often serving as the monetary backer for her efforts in doing so, taking from the royal coffers and estates to fund the translation, printing and spreading of the bible in Irish Gaelic.

Outside of his conjugal life and religion, Edward VI’s personal life and relationships is a matter that is often misrepresented and debated. Unlike what is often believed, Edward VI was a relatively gregarious individual most of the time, being known in special for being, even after 1553, a surprisingly charming and endearing individual, being marked by having an almost incredibly ease to make friends, even if he was known for having only a few with whom he was truly close.
Among his friendships, though, Edward VI’s most famous and remembered one is that which he had with Barnaby Fitzpatrick, 2nd Baron Upper Ossory. Childhood companions, the two shared a deep attachment for their entire lives, with Edward freely admitting as an adult that the bond he had with Barnaby was only comparable to the one he had with his wife.
Especially in Edward’s later years, Barnaby was one of the few people who made him actually seem pleased with or enjoy things, and as he became frailer and bedridden the two would often spend entire days and night in the king’s quarters playing cards, joking around, doing governmental work, or even simply spending time together.

Within his family, Edward was known for having a deep admiration for his father, whom he lost early in life, and an complicated relationship with his sisters, whom he grew-up close to and was openly caring but whom he often bashed heads and personalities with.
As a child it is often said that Edward VI had a species of rivalry with his sister Elizabeth, with whom he often felt the need to “match” in the matter of his own education and learning, and as adults the two often involved themselves in matches of wit and planning as a way to stack-up on eachother. During Edward VI’s early reign, the two are also remembered for having a period of a great estrangement between them, caused in great part by the events surrounding Lord Thomas Seymour, and it was only following her scandal and his convalescence that their relationship recovered.

With his sister Mary, Edward’s relationship was even more complex and tumultuous at times, as he grew up seeing her, in a way, as a surrogate mother, and while often times priggish in his opinions about her religion, going as far as (mainly during the early 1550s) threatening Mary with retaliatory actions on the matter, as he grew older Edward strangely came to resign himself to never truly acting, and with time not even really commenting, on his sister’s religious position, while Mary herself chose to over time not think about the gigantic elephant in the room between them.
To many the point that showed (or possibly motivated) that development was in 1555, when Lady Mary, then 39, became pregnant out of wedlock[6]. Although silent when he heard the news, the king answered them a few weeks later (some weeks of tense uncertainty among both his court and whatever parts of Europe had already heard of the situation) by personally riding to visiting his sister. No-one really knows what the two were thinking or what they spoke, but the meeting between them at Hunsdon House ended with Mary moving back to court, and a few months later Edward gave her a dukedom[7].
While Mary returned to living away from court later on, and would only periodically return to visit, the two siblings remained relatively close until her death in 1561.

Sickly from 1553 until the end of his life, Edward VI died at the age of 31 in July 16th, 1569, from what was probably him finally giving in to consumption after their many years together. Outlived by all but one of his children, Edward VI was succeeded by his only surviving son, the nine-years-old Henry IX.
Jane Grey would outlive her husband by 35 years, dying in the early years of the 17th century, and would serve as Queen Regent to their son and then sit on the Regency Council for their grandson, and live to see their daughter, and eldest child, become England (and Ireland)’s first Queen Regnant.



[1] the matter of the titles of the monarch of Ireland was a contentious one during Edward VI's adult reign (as well as at least parts of those of his children), as although officially “King of Ireland”, the nature of the title as a very recent one resulted on various vassals (both nominal or not) referring to the monarch as “Lord of Ireland” during their dealings and diplomacy with his deputies, although by the end of the 16th century the title “King/Queen of Ireland” had become the sole one being used
[2] Elizabeth (and, when ordered by her, Robert) never revealed the exact date of the elopement, and only said that it was after her 18th birthday and early enough that her son was conceived in holy matrimony
[3] Jane was the first woman in the Peerage of England to inherit a dukedom on her own right, the story of how that happened begging with Lady Frances Brandon, Jane's mother and the eldest daughter and surviving child of Princess Mary, younger sister of Henry VIII, and Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk (of the second creation), who, when her half-brothers, the 2nd and 3rd dukes, died in 1551 (only hours form each-other), became the seniormost descendant of the 1st duke even if his title became extinct.
Now, as Lady Frances was of royal descent and her husband, Lord Henry Grey, a high-ranking peer, having inherited the Marquessate of Dorset from his father in 1530 as its 3rd Marquess, and a member of Edward VI’s regency council, it was decided to make said husband the first Duke of Suffolk of a third creation through Frances’ personal right to the title, with Henry Grey being granted the title on October 11th, 1551, at the same ceremony where John Dudley was made the “1st Duke of Northumberland”.
Although the couple was relatively young (both Henry and Frances being in their mid-30s), they lacked any surviving sons and had seen a relatively long between the births of their three daughters, resulting on the decision for Henry’s letters patent to establish that, should he died without male heirs, the title would be inherited by his eldest daughter, Jane, although the title of “Marquess of Dorset” would not be included in her “theoretical” inheritance as it had no , having instead Henry’s younger brother, John, as its presumptive heir.
Interestingly, this single stipulation, creating a semi-salic succession to the dukedom, resulted on, in the following years and decades, the gradual normalization of new peerages being created already semi-salic, which culminated on a royal act retroactively making all hereditary titles semi-salic in inheritance
Although Jane’s parents weren’t old and continued trying to have children, she in the end inherited her father’s dukedom only a few months after becoming Queen, when her father died in an accident while hunting with the royal couple (causing Jane to forswear any kind of hunting and even most outdoors physical activities).
Frances, now a widow, remarried a few years later to her Master of the Horse, Adrian Stokes, and had with him some happy and rather fruitful 20 years together
[4] the future Queen consort Isabella of Spain
[5] by her first marriage the Countess of Essex, by birth Lady Lettice had the strange status of both being and not-being King Edward VI's cousin, as her mother, Catherine Carey, was the niece of Queen Anne Boleyn through her sister, Mary Boleyn, and as such Lettice was by blood the first cousin once removed of his sister Elizabeth. A relatively-considerable number of modern historians believe that Catherine Carey was actually a biological child of Henry VIII, as she was born around the time her mother was Henry's mistress, if those historians are correct, then Lettice was Edward’s biological half-niece
[6] At some point in late 1555 or early 1556, Lady Mary had some species of emotional breakdown, which she later told was due to a mix of an epiphany over her own life and anguish/jealousy over her own wishes for a family in light of the at the time recent birth of her brother’s eldest daughter, and ended-up getting, as some would say, “plastered” before bedding one of her servants
[7] the Dukedom of Buckingham is often considered probably the English peerage with the most unusual laws in regards to its inheritance, as, due to the boy’s birth out of wedlock, Edward VI established the dukedom’s remainder as being “to the heirs of the 1st Duke’s body by any means begotten”, meaning that, unlike any other English peerage, the dukedom is passable through both legitimate and illegitimate lines
 
For anyone interested in them, here are the posts that made-up this TL until now.
For certain reasons, most of them can be considered as "semi-cannonical" for the TL as it currently stands, by which I mean they are still correct on most broad strokes but some details and parts have been altered with the revisions

Edward VI to Thomas II (lineage)
Henry XII & I to Anne (lineage)
Henry XII & II & I to the present (lineage)
Empress Guinevere of America
The Northeastern Premier Lords of America
The Southern Premier Lords of America
The Central Premier Lords of America
Europe in 2020
Eastern North America in 2020
The Polish Lithuanian Cirisis and its main leaders
The Empire of Louisiane, its origins and history
 
For anyone interested in them, here are the posts that made-up this TL until now.
For certain reasons, most of them can be considered as "semi-cannonical" for the TL as it currently stands, by which I mean they are still correct on most broad strokes but some details and parts have been altered with the revisions

Edward VI to Thomas II (lineage)
Henry XII & I to Anne (lineage)
Henry XII & II & I to the present (lineage)
Empress Guinevere of America
The Northeastern Premier Lords of America
The Southern Premier Lords of America
The Central Premier Lords of America
Europe in 2020
Eastern North America in 2020
The Polish Lithuanian Cirisis and its main leaders
The Empire of Louisiane, its origins and history
I always loved those maps!! Happy to see a timeline for it finally!
 
And for those curious about the name, it comes from a line on the threat "List of Monarchs III" that I started with the same premise as this TL back in July 2020, with credit going to (I think) @Premier Taylerov for adding the name to it (which got lodged into my brain as a perfect one for this TL)...​
I look forward to seeing how this timeline checks out - and just in case you're interested the original 'cold-hearted swot' quote comes from the historian Michael Wood. :)
 
Here's my inaugural batch of questions:

1) Is the British Emperor also King of Minorca?
2) What are the periods in English/British history that are named after monarchs?
3) What happened to the Wittelsbachs of Bavaria?
4) Are there any members of the Brtitsh royal family that became centenarians?
5) When did Sweden become the United Kingdom of the Baltic?
6) Do the Netherlands have any sub-national monarchies?
7) Are there any male lines from the House of Valois that survive to the present day?
8) What's the oldest intact British royal dukedom?
 
Last edited:
The Lands of Europe, and some of those around Her, in January 1st, 2031 CE|AD
Also known as "7th Ramadan, 1452 AH", "6th of Tevet, AM 5791", or "January 1st, AM 7539", by the Islamic, Hebrew and Byzantine reckonings
and as "December 19th, 2030", by the Old Style of the Christian reckoning
1641575803955.png
 
Last edited:
A Cropped Map of the American continent, in January 1st, 2030 CE|AD
Also known as "December 19th, 2030", "January 1st, 401 SS", "13.0.18.5.5", "6th of Tevet, AM 5791", "January 1st, AM 7539", "January 1st, 833 AB/498 AF", "January 1st, 1031/December 19th, 1031", "December 25th, IE 192", or "December 30th, 2030, Bunkyū 38", by the Old Style Christian, Louisianan, Mayan, Hebrew, Byzantine, Incan, Nordic, Columbian, and Iapanese reckonings.
She is also called, with varying levels of frequency and sincerity, as "Hesperia", "the Americas", "Amerrisque", Ixachitlan, "Abyala", "Cemanahuac", "Cabotia", "Columbia", "Hanunea", "Turturia", "Vinlandia", "Yōkoku" and "the New World"

1641583570053.png
 
Last edited:
1) Is the British Emperor also King of Minorca?
Yes, he is. Interestingly, Minorca does have a family of de facto semi-hereditary viceroys, the House of Abravanel, who count among their ranks (both in the male line and through the female-line or marriage) about 70% of all the kingdom's governors and viceroys through the centuries
2) What are the periods in English/British history that are named after monarchs?
They are, in chronological order:
- the Edwardian Era, which is divided between 1547-1569 (Incarnate Edwardian Era) and 1569-1580 (Posthumous Edwardian Era, often called the "Regencies Period")
- the Elizabethan Age (1583-1630)
- the Enriquean Age (1690-1758)
- the Jacobite Gasp (1774)
- the Victorian Era (1774-1832)
- the Second Elizabethan Period (1889-1948)
- and the August(ine) Age (1957-2005)
3) What happened to the Wittelsbachs of Bavaria?
To make a long story short. They never gained the Upper Palatinate in the 17th century, even if they did still manage to be invested as Electors (the Sixty-Six Years War was quite the confusing time), and due to different dynastic developments the branch is still alive in modern times
4) Are there any members of the British royal family that became centenarians?
If we include illegitimate children, I could find one (looking at the earlier generations when being a centenarian was even harder), Harriet FitzPrince, by marriage Baroness Paleologue of Barbados, a half-sister of Henry IX & I who lived to the ripe old age of 117
5) When did Sweden become the United Kingdom of the Baltic?
Sweden officially became the UKotB during the late 19th century, although the developments that led to it started at the end of the 17th
6) Do the Netherlands have any sub-national monarchies?
That is an interesting question, to be sincere, as some would say that the Principality of Orange, although in personal union with the Stadtholder of the Netherlands, is a subnational monarchy. And the Dutch nobility's rights and authority makes that question a bit of a doozy.
Officially, though, the Netherlands actually lack any sub-national monarchy
7) Are there any male lines from the House of Valois that survive to the present day?
Well, it all depends on if you're asking it about legitimate lines or lines in general. If it is legitimate lines, then no; if it is illegitimate ones... then there's about three dozen known ones (most of them live in the Americas, and, interestingly, South Asia)

There is a modern House of Valois, though, but they're a branch of the House of Bourbon
8) What's the oldest intact British royal dukedom?
A part of me sorely wants to say "Dukedom of Pembroke", as it was created for Edward VI's sister, Elizabeth, and has remained on her male-line ever since. But another part of me considers that as being a bit of trying to work my way around a question, so that can't do.

The oldest intact (by which I imagine means "male-line only") royal (by which I mean only those started by dynastic descendants of British monarchs) dukedom is actually the Dukedom of Clarence, which has stood since... 1807.

The officially oldest royal dukedom, though, is the Dukedom of Richmond, which has existed since 1603 but died on the male line two generations in
 
Last edited:
What's going on in Tunis? it looks to be French seeing the name
In modern times it is independent, but in relation to colonial powers it was Spanish.

Basically, the matter with the Kingdom of Ifriquía is that, ITTL, Spain ended-up focusing a great deal of time and effort on North Africa and the Mediterranean and ended-up being quite successful at that. The result is that, by the 19th century, a good chunk of Northern Africa (plus some other bits and pieces) were held by Spain for a long while, who, due to a changed modus operanti and opinion on certain matters, had been quite successful in either converting the locals to Christianity or swamping them out with Spanish "Moors" (who remained on Spain to present times).

So, Ifriquía (a name taken from the region's past) is a place where conversion was the most common manner through which things happened, and so it is a Christian (which is quite "localized") "Berber" country that speaks a language that I can best describe as "Maltese if you replaced English and French with a boatload of Spanish influence" and is considered culturally a part of Europe.

The North-African country considered to be "the one French" (although the Iberian, in special Catalan and Andalusian, is still very much present) is Mauretania, who was established by the union of the kingdoms of Algeria (French) and Berbería (Spanish) in the 20th century
 
1) How is Augusta's husband related to the Grand Duke of Fulda?
2) Where there any breaks in the personal union between the Netherlands and Orange?
3) Are there any claimants to the British throne?
4) Is Rhagluniaeth ruled by the British Emperor, and if not who is the ancestor of it's monarchy?
5) Did the first King of (American) Transylvania marry twice?
6) Does the Grand Viceroyality of Piedmont have any constituent states that are not ruled by the House of Piedmont?
7) Is Andorra co-ruled by the Navarrese monarch?
8) Who is the current longest reigning monarch that is living?
 
Sorry for the long waiting time for the answer, until yesterday I was in a two-weeks baking vocational course who took over most of my free time (Yesterday was the start of week 2, but due to worries over Covid the college that provided it suspended all its physical classes until second notice, I'm probably going back in early or middle February), so during the weekend I ended-up focusing mainly on some in-progress works for the Albion TL (Monday it was just because I was exhausted after coming back from the course and didn't have the energy to even turn on the computer
1) How is Augusta's husband related to the Grand Duke of Fulda?
I can't say anything about that yet because this specific question made me remember I should finish making the revised boxes for the British monarchs (as I said, this early January has been made by some hectic few weeks). But in the OG!boxes he was the son of the third son of a Grand Duke of Fulda
2) Where there any breaks in the personal union between the Netherlands and Orange?
Orange the principality has generally maintained a semi-salic/salic view on its succession, so generally speaking every time there was a female Stadtholder of the Netherlands the two broke their personal union*. The funny thing is that every time that happens, a cousin marriage ends-up reuniting the two of them back together in a generation or two (generally speaking there has been a history of a female Stadtholder of the Netherlands having only daughters to succeed her and her successor marrying her cousin who is the heir to/prince of Orange)

*funny story here: I'm not a native English speaker (in fact, I'm even sure If I consider myself fluent since while I can read, write and hear English I'm not nearly as well-off in the area of speaking, since when I try my accent is so thick and my pronunciation so horrid my mother, who is a fluent English speaker, doesn't understand what I'm saying most of the time), so for a really long time I had the tendency to call any personal union a "union of crowns"
3) Are there any claimants to the British throne?
That is a question I am sincerely unable to answer at the moment, because I, like something of an idiot, completely forgot about that sort of thing (I'm erring on the side of "yes", though, I've had some interesting ideas about Reginald Pole)
4) Is Rhagluniaeth ruled by the British Emperor, and if not who is the ancestor of it's monarchy?
Rhagluniaeth is this world's version of the Kingdom of Miskitia if it had so much Irish and Welsh influence (due to the fact that although Anglo-Irish and British-Irish relationship never became as bad as OTL, ITTL factors (in special a major population boom) caused many English and British monarchs to make a large effort in resettling the population surplus in the Americas, with what became Rhagluniaeth (which is actually colloquially known as "Deaonia", which I may just decide to make the kingdom's official name due to "Rhagluniaeth", which is Welsh for "Providence" according to Google Tanslate, being a fricking mouthfull) being in special settled by Irish "Catholics" (it varies) from Leinster and Welshmen from Denbigh, Merioneth and Caernarfonshire

So, answering to your question about who rules the kingdom. It is officially a Pentarchy, with the British Emperor being the "Imperial Sovereign/High King" while there are four separate kings under them
- The King of Tiacuzpan (colloquially known as "King in the North"), whose "seat" is the city of Cuntioth (ITTL Sandy Bay), he's descended from King Henfyn (ITTL counterpart of Oldman, in OTL the first known "King of the Miskito", with Henfyn being the "Deaonian" translation of "Oldman")
- The King of Tirlothian (colloquially known as "King in the East"), whose "seat" is the city of Perlis (in the OTL Pearls Lagoon), he's descended from Lord Anthony MacCarthy, of the Adrigole Branch (being as such a descendant of Princess Elizabeth), who established the port town that became Perlis and gained a royal grant over most of what is Tirlothian's modern territory
- The King of Melsmeryn (colloquially known as "King in the South"), whose "seat" is the city of Eorcaer, he's descended from Sir Reginald Myrick-Wynn, by birth the third son of the 2nd Baron of Gwydir, a Welsh adventurer/nobleman (and supposedly a legitimate patrilineal descendant of Owain the Great), and Lady Gwendolyn FitzTudor, of the FitzTudors of Westmorland, who together became de facto government-approved warlords and established their own petty kingdom in the land's early settler era
- The King of Matagalpan (colloquially known as "King in the West"), whose "seat" is the city of Yharnam, he's descended from Inés Ramírez de Santillana y Huitzimengari, a Criollo nobleman who established a kingdom for himself during the collapse of the Spanish New World, and his wife, Maria Annalisa de Nádasdy y Asuaje, known as "La Carnicera"
5) Did the first King of (American) Transylvania marry twice?
I think so? What makes you ask?
6) Does the Grand Viceroyality of Piedmont have any constituent states that are not ruled by the House of Piedmont?
Although there are some feudal estates could be considered as de facto being such (due to either having a certain level of granted autonomy or being a part of constituent states that have de facto become nominal in their territorial integrity), Piedmont is officially only made by the domain of the Grand Prince and the secundogenitures of the House of Piedmont
7) Is Andorra co-ruled by the Navarrese monarch?
Andorra and Navarre, like all other members of the Bourbon Family Pact, are not under a personal union. Interestingly, it actually was the separation of Navarre, Andorra and Pallars from their personal union that propelled the development of the family pact into an actual regional alliance
8) Who is the current longest reigning monarch that is living?
I think this was the first time I didn't have to think when answering your question, as this time it was already carved in my mind:

The longest reigning monarch that is living, as of 2030, is Albert V of Prussia, who ascended to the Prutenic Waffenthron at the age of 17 in April 2nd, 1946, and has continued to sit on it for the past 84 years (he's also the oldest reigning monarch not under some sort of regency)
 
Last edited:
I think so? What makes you ask?
Because in the OG version Marcel I of Ohio (which I think is what Transylvania originally was) married one of the sisters of Emperor Gawain I of America, but in one of the lineages of the British monarchs had Leonor of Maine as Queen of Ohio.
Inés Ramírez de Santillana y Huitzimengari, a Criollo nobleman who established a kingdom for himself during the collapse of the Spanish New World, and also from
What were you going to say next?
 
Last edited:
Because in the OG version Marcel I of Ohio (which I think is what Transylvania originally was) married one of the sisters of Emperor Gawain I of America, but in one of the lineages of the British monarchs had Leonor of Maine as Queen of Ohio.
Ahn, yeah, now I get it. Now that you reminded me, I can now say with certainty that, yes, Marcel I married twice, with Gawain I's sister being his second wife
What were you going to say next?
I was originally going to say how he descended from one of the British monarchs through an illegitimate line, but then you asking what I was going to say gave me a more interesting idea (which by the time you read this should have been edited into the answer)
 
Top