The Bush-Lieberman Administration

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Jackson Lennock, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. Jackson Lennock Well-Known Member

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    Dec 18, 2017
    What if the 2000 election had gone to the House of Representatives and the outcome was the House declaring Bush President but the Senate picks Lieberman as VP?
     
  2. Colonel Zoidberg Well-Known Member

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    Aug 20, 2008
    Cheney ends up in the Cabinet, 9/11 and Iraq go ahead as normal, Bush picks a new running mate in 2004 who probably isn’t Cheney and wins. No idea who.
     
  3. darklordoftech Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2016
    - Do Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz still get nominated?

    - I wonder what the reaction to Janet Jackson is.
     
  4. Theoretical_TJ Well-Known Member

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    You don't see the strong Vice Presidency anomaly that was the Bush Administration, compared to historical norms. Biden and Pence have countered that trend pretty strongly.
     
  5. Jackson Lennock Well-Known Member

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    Dec 18, 2017
    DHS Secretary Tom Ridge?


    Odds are Cheney gets Defense Secretary. It was kind of odd that Rumsfeld got Defense Secretary OTL, so maybe he doesn't get anything TTL. Otherwise, Cheney gets State, Powell gets zip or some other appointment (UN Ambassador?)

    What are the odds we end up with a disproportionately influential Secretary of Defense Cheney or Secretary of State Cheney?
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
  6. Theoretical_TJ Well-Known Member

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    Dec 21, 2014
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    That would not have been an outlier event given the structure of US governmental power. In this case, it's not the person so much as it is the office. Cheney was the most distinctive Vice President in US history, being the 2nd or 3rd most powerful man in the Administration. That was unprecedented, and back when I was studying political science in the mid-'00s, it was a really open question about whether future Vice Presidents would build on Cheney's institutional inroads and overt influence to make it into the second most powerful office in the Executive in the long-term. At least as far as Obama and Trump go, that's not been the case.