THE BEATEN PATH: One Bicentennial and Counting

I wonder if Chafee and Brook will defect to the Liberals by the end of their term
Maybe, or maybe not. Time will tell.

Only thing I will point out is that John Chafee is a brand new Senator at the moment, having just been elected in 1976 - take that as you will towards his willingness to defect.
 
ACT ONE: Part 5
The Grin Has Won - The Carter Years
HubertHoratioHornblower - January 22nd, 2019

Jimmy Carter was riding high. Through challenge after challenge, from the ABC movement spearheaded by Jerry Brown to the tumultuous nature of the primaries, he had done it: he was the nominee, the man to take back the White House. Now, though, he needed to make the biggest choice of his political career: who would be his right-hand man, the Vice President. Personally, he wanted to pick Scoop Jackson, whose fellow middle-of-the-road beliefs and foreign policy chops appealed to the internationally-inexperienced Governor. But Tim Kraft had other ideas. Tim Kraft always had other ideas.

“Jimmy, I’m going to be honest: Jackson is going to alienate a lot of people. Hell, even half of the staff doesn’t like him, and that’s just based on personality! It feels like you’re doubling down, not uniting the party.”

Carter’s protests took several hours to quell, but eventually Kraft and those who agreed with him won out over the candidate’s stubbornness. As such, they went to the next pick on the list. At the next morning’s press conference, Governor Carter made his announcement.

“For the Vice-Presidency, I intend to nominate Senator Birch Bayh.”

SuperWaffle1998 and 3 others like this.
SuperWaffle1998 - January 22nd, 2019

JIMMY! I’m a sucker for well-meaning peanut farmers :p. Also wonder how it’s going to be to see a Carter-free cabinet and Daddy Bayh without his hands on the Constitution…
Dolphus - January 23rd, 2019

Would the Liberals have any staying power under a Carter administration? I mean, they were mostly driven by anger towards Ronald Reagan, no? Personally, I imagine the Liberal Caucus being the place where Mathias + Javits sit in the corner and think about what they’ve done. Either way, I like the idea and can’t want to see more, HHH (and the username is top tier).

“We wished to bring change to the party we loved from within. However, our objections went entirely unnoticed, as if the President and his allies did not wish to acknowledge our displeasure. We objected to Robert Bork’s nomination, and it fell on deaf ears. We voted against Kemp-Roth, and none seemed to care that we would. It is clear that our position in the Republican Party is no longer tenable. As such, all eight present today will be changing our party registration to the Liberal Party. Senators Mathias and Javits have done good work for this country. They see the dangers posed by the ideology espoused by the White House. They see our economic stagnation. They see the discrimination thinly veiled by the excuse of states’ rights. They see the encroachment of private faith onto our government’s fundamental policies as the threat to freedom of religion it is. This, among other reasons, is why we join them.”

House Opposition Leader Jim Jeffords (L-VT-AL) announcing his switch to the Liberal Party, March 12th, 1978.


Above: House Opposition Leader Jim Jeffords (L-VT-AL)


REAGAN REBUKED: SEVEN CONGRESSMEN AND ONE SENATOR JOIN LIBERAL PARTY

...the list of defectors consists of Jim Jeffords (VT-AL), Millicent Fenwick (NJ-5), Pete McCloskey (CA-12), Stewart McKinney (CT-4), Frank Horton (NY-34), Silvio Conte (MA-1), and Joel Pritchard (WA-1) in the House, as well as Lowell Weicker (CT) in the Senate. Senator Mathias is expected to hold a press conference with his party’s newest members later this week...

THE WASHINGTON POST, March 13th, 1978


Reporter: Senator Mathias, do you feel that the recent defections to your party are supportive of the ideas espoused by you in 1976, or simply a rejection of President Reagan’s dominance in the Republican Party.
Charles Mathias: Look, there’s a whole host of actions that could’ve been taken if this was against the President. At the end of the day, they chose to join the Liberal Party. They decided that the proposals of myself and Senator Javits were the best option. They joined us, not “not Reagan.”
R: Will you be running candidates in the midterm elections?
CM: A bit late to ask that, isn’t it? [REPORTERS LAUGH] We already are.

Charles Mathias at a press conference, March 14th, 1978


Dan Rather: So, after the Jeffords Eight joined the Liberals, what was the next step forwards?
Lawrence Hogan: Well, we needed to plan for the midterms. We had candidates running, primarily in the northeast and west coast.
DR: Why not anywhere else?
LH: The two-party system is very resilient. Third parties only tend to break through regionally - the Populists only did well in the plains states, George Wallace in the deep south, and so on. We knew that we were no exception, and we didn’t waste our resources in areas where we couldn’t build an effective organization. Our goal was to gain more members of Congress, then to start building a national machine.
DR: But that didn’t end up happening.
LH: Well, yes, but we couldn’t predict what would happen in Baltimore. 1980 definitely threw a wrench in our long-term plans.
DR: So, in the meantime you focused on building up in the northeast and west coast. How did you tend to campaign there?
LH: We weren’t strict enforcers of the party line in every aspect. Did we care that the candidates stood for us on key issues? Yes, of course. Did we give them a little wiggle room, especially on economic issues? Absolutely. Even when we were a two-man show, those two men held very different opinions economically.
DR: What would be an example of one of these key issues?
LH: Electoral reform. If you didn’t support the Bayh Amendment, you were out.
DR: Why electoral reform?
LH: Because that was the key to the survival of our party.

60 Minutes Interview with Fmr. Mathias Campaign Manager Lawrence Hogan, 1987


NORTH, SOUTH CAROLINA VOTE TO RATIFY ERA

...This makes North Carolina and South Carolina the 35th and 36th states, respectively, to ratify the Amendment…

THE NEW YORK TIMES, March 27th, 1978


RED AFGHANISTAN: KHAN OVERTHROWN, TARAKI PROCLAIMS COMMUNIST GOVERNMENT

THE NEW YORK TIMES, April 30th, 1978


CALIFORNIA APPROVES PROPOSITION 13 BY 53-47 MARGIN

...the measure was expected to pass by a far wider margin, polling as high as 60% in favor at its peak...

THE WASHINGTON POST, June 7th, 1978


BLACK FRIDAY: ROYAL SOLDIERS OPEN FIRE ON PROTESTERS IN TEHRAN

LE MONDE, September 8th, 1978


Above: A photo taken on Black Friday, one of the most infamous moments of the buildup to the Iranian Revolution.


I had to interrupt. “Mr. President, the Shah is not going to survive this. He tried to tamp down on the dissenters, but all he did was give them an adrenaline boost. It’s not about how he falls, but rather, who topples him.”
President Reagan sat quietly for a moment, with Bill Clark standing at his shoulder, leveling a gaze at me that I could only described as calm annoyance. Then. the President spoke. “What are the odds we can push the Shah into giving in to some of the less radical demands for democratization?”
Before I could respond, Bill did so for me. “Trying to push the Shah won’t work, sir. He thinks he is Iran, and no amount of pressure will change that. We need to hold firm here, and reiterate our support for the Pahlavi dynasty. Who takes power if he isn’t there? The Islamists? The communists?” At that word the President sat up a bit straighter. “We saw what Brezhnev did in Afghanistan, no doubt he’d do it again in Iran.” Bill shot me another look, this one with a clear message in it. Your move, it said.
“With all due respect, sir, there’s almost no chance that the communists could gain any foothold here. They’re all filing into a vague opposition spearheaded by the Ayatollahs, and when the Shah goes down, the Ayatollahs will take power. When has a theocracy ever been anything close to what the communists want? The Shah can be reasoned with. We can make him give in somewhat, loosen his despotic grip on Iran, and our allies will still be standing.” For what felt like an eternity, the President sat, hands folded. Finally, he spoke.
“Any chance of Brezhnev’s evil empire growing is too much to risk. Secretary, you’re going to go to Tehran to tell the Shah that the United States of America has his back, no matter what.”

A STATESMAN’S LIFE, George Bush’s autobiography written in 2003


All Papal conclaves are done behind closed doors, and as such we can not definitively say what happened in the 1978 papal conclave. However, we can make a handful of partially-informed guesses:

Entering the conclave, Venetian Patriarch Albino Luciani was supposedly the preferred candidate. However, upon his supposed victory, he apparently turned down the post for unknown reasons. Considering his death via heart attack mere weeks later, his health may have been his motive to decline. After this, the conclave was left scrambling for a new papabile. Eventually, their decision, while quite unorthodox, was largely based on the fact that he was both a staunch advocate for Luciani, assuring some of Luciani’s prior supporters, and the powerful nature of the selection of a non-Italian Pope living in an authoritarian nation. By their decree, Aloisio Lorscheider of Brazil was selected as the next Pope. Then, as the white smoke went up, Lorscheider performed his first action as Martin VI and walked out onto the balcony.

THE LIBERATION OF ALL: The Life of Pope Martin VI, written in 2008


Above: Pope Martin VI (birth name: Aloisio Lorscheider) in 1978, just prior to his selection as Pope.


PRIME MINISTER THATCHER: TORIES PICK UP THIRTEEN-SEAT MAJORITY IN WESTMINSTER

Conservative: 321
Labour: 308
Liberal: 6
Other: 15

THE GUARDIAN, September 16th, 1978


“I spoke to Mrs. Thatcher last night to congratulate her on her victory, and I look forward to working with her government more closely. Our nations have always had a special relationship, and strengthening these bonds is something that both myself and Mrs. Thatcher agree on.”

President Reagan’s comments on the British election, September 16th, 1978


OKLAHOMA VOTES TO RATIFY ERA

...with the State House’s 60-41 vote, this makes Oklahoma the 37th state to ratify the Amendment. The amendment is scheduled to come to a vote in Missouri later this month, where a fierce battle is expected...

THE OKLAHOMAN, September 27th, 1978


Reporter: How does the President feel about the fact that the Equal Rights Amendment may become the 27th Amendment later this week?
Lyn Nofziger: The President has reiterated his personal opposition to the amendment’s ratification, in agreement with Governor Bond. However, he will respect the decision the states, specifically Missouri this week, make. Next question.

White House Press Secretary Lyn Nofziger at a press conference, October 14th, 1978


Anchor: Missouri’s potential to be the 38th and final state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment has caused a storm in Jefferson City as people come out on both sides to have their voices heard. Let’s go to Diane, who’s currently outside the state Capitol. Diane?
[CHANTING PROTESTERS IN THE BACKGROUND]
Correspondent: Jack, I’m here outside of the state Capitol in Jefferson City, where the vote on the Equal Rights Amendment is expected to occur in two days. Already a horde of people are lined up outside both in support of and in opposition to the Amendment’s ratification in what is expected to be a very close vote. As you can no doubt hear, it’s been very lively-
[CHEER FROM PRO-ERA SIDE FOLLOWED BY SILENCE]
J: Diane, what’s going on down there?
D: Jack, it appears that… it appears that Senator Jerry Litton is walking up to the pro-ERA crowd. Both sides seem to be waiting to see why he’s here, or what he’s going to do. Senator Litton is walking up to the woman leading the supporters. Oop, she’s handing him her microphone. Let’s see what’s-
Jerry Litton: Why’d you stop? I’m not John Lennon or anything [LAUGHTER]. If you think I’m going to give some grand speech here, you’re wrong. The only reason I’m here is to join you in expressing my support for this amendment’s ratification, same as the fine people in this crowd. It’s long past time for this country to treat all of its people equally, no matter their gender. That being said, I’d like to hand this microphone back to Paula here. She’s doing an excellent job organizing this, and you all truly prove that the power of the American people united can do anything.
[LITTON HANDS MICROPHONE BACK]
Paula: Gosh… thank you, Senator. I-wow, thank you.
[CHEERS OF LITTON, LITTON, LITTON BEGIN IN PRO-ERA CROWD]
P: Now… Ratify! Ratify! Ratify!
[CHANTS BEGIN]
D: Jack, it seems that Senator Litton is sticking around to join the protest. The demonstrators opposed to the Amendment do not seem to know what to do, now that the most well-liked man in Missouri is in the crowd opposing them. Now back to you in the studio, Jack…

From a KSDK News story about the ERA ratification battle in Missouri, October 14th, 1978

POTUSOfMyHeart.jpg

Above: Sen. Jerry Litton (D-MO) speaks to a group of demonstrators in favor of the ERA.


ERA FALLS SHORT IN SENATE, 18-15

THE KANSAS CITY STAR, October 17th, 1978


After the Equal Rights Amendment was rejected by the Missouri state legislature, my father was absolutely crushed. He had fought hard on that one. I remember no less than a dozen state senators stopping by at our ranch and having a drink with my father while he needled them on the Amendment. But it always felt like something more than that. Eventually, years later, I decided to ask him why it bothered him so much for those few weeks. He simply told me this:

“Well, Linda… I felt like I had let a whole lot of people down. Sure, I can say I felt like I let down millions of women in this country by losing that fight. But really, it was more than that. I felt like I let Birch down. It was one of his four, and I knew this one was particularly dear to him. Most importantly, though, I felt like I had let you down. I never wanted you to grow up in a country where there was nothing concrete proving that you were equal to every boy you sat next to in class. Sure, laws existed to stop that, but what good are those laws if people like Phyllis Schlafly or Ronald Reagan can mobilize the troops and repeal them or gut them into meaninglessness? I had a real chance to do good, to help so many people, but most of all, I had a chance to use my position and influence to make a better country for you. Then, when the vote came in, I felt like I blew it.”

DIALOGUES WITH MY FATHER, written by Linda Litton, published in 2011


I can say right now that ‘78 would’ve been a hell of a lot different if the ERA was ratified in October. Left-wing voters would’ve been complacent, Reagan’s supporters would’ve been incensed… perfect. Instead, those damned Missouri senators and that damned Kit Bond had such a short-term view of the issue. They won the battle, but they only pissed Dems and Libs off for November. Politics, at the end of the day, isn’t about winning each battle - it’s like chess, and clearly Kit Bond never learned how to sacrifice a piece to win the game.

Comments made by Lee Atwater to Michael Wolff in 1982, later published by Wolff in "Three Days in the Lion's Den" in 2015 following Atwater's death
 
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All Papal conclaves are done behind closed doors, and as such we can not definitively say what happened in the 1978 papal conclave. However, we can make a handful of partially-informed guesses:

Entering the conclave, Venetian Patriarch Albino Luciani was supposedly the preferred candidate. However, upon his supposed victory, he apparently turned down the post for unknown reasons. Considering his death via heart attack mere weeks later, his health may have been his motive to decline. After this, the conclave was left scrambling for a new papabile. Eventually, their decision, while quite unorthodox, was largely based on the fact that he was both a staunch advocate for Luciani, assuring some of Luciani’s prior supporters, and the powerful nature of the selection of a non-Italian Pope living in an authoritarian nation. By their decree, Aloisio Lorscheider of Brazil was selected as the next Pope. Then, as the white smoke went up, Lorscheider performed his first action as Martin II and walked out onto the balcony.

THE LIBERATION OF ALL: The Life of Pope Martin II, written in 2008


Above: Pope Martin II (birth name: Aloisio Lorscheider) in 1978, just prior to his selection as Pope.
The new post sounds great, but the Catholic Church had five Popes who took the name of Martin (the last, Martin V, just after the Council of Costance that ended the Western Schism). So Lorscheider would be Martin VI, not II.
 
The new post sounds great, but the Catholic Church had five Popes who took the name of Martin (the last, Martin V, just after the Council of Costance that ended the Western Schism). So Lorscheider would be Martin VI, not II.
Gah! That was a typo, accidentally put II where I meant to put VI. Stupid Roman numerals. Fixed.
 
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I not too worried about era there a lot of other state where it could be ratified
Like the progressive bastions of... checks notes Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.

Nah but in all seriousness, Missouri’s decision did deal a massive blow to the ratification of an amendment that needs to do it by March. Not saying it won’t happen, but feasible options are limited.
 
Like the progressive bastions of... checks notes Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama.

Nah but in all seriousness, Missouri’s decision did deal a massive blow to the ratification of an amendment that needs to do it by March. Not saying it won’t happen, but feasible options are limited.
yes but there are still many other states where it could get passed but it never was propsed because the movment fizzeled out looking at you Illinois, so just need it to keep going for a little while and get to those states.
 
I hate to say this, but I agree with Lee Atwater--are they ice-skating in Hell?

Talk about stirring a hornets' nest...
 
yes but there are still many other states where it could get passed but it never was propsed because the movment fizzeled out looking at you Illinois, so just need it to keep going for a little while and get to those states.
Not going to comment on what states are eyeing that March deadline.
 
Not going to comment on what states are eyeing that March deadline.
wouldn't want to spoil future plot lines :p
speaking of the march deadline but I belive there is a debate going in the present about whether the deadline matters at all and whether if virginia nominates it does that mean the ERA is ratifted? Not gonna go in more detail because I don't know enough information about the legal debate to make a well informed opinion, also do not wish to evoke the wrath of the ever-watchful bear
 
wouldn't want to spoil future plot lines :p
speaking of the march deadline but I belive there is a debate going in the present about whether the deadline matters at all and whether if virginia nominates it does that mean the ERA is ratifted? Not gonna go in more detail because I don't know enough information about the legal debate to make a well informed opinion, also do not wish to evoke the wrath of the ever-watchful bear
Let him who hath understanding reckon the sign of the Bear.

Anyways, let’s just say that their goal is to avoid the legal dubiousness of the deadline by finishing it by March. There could be a court challenge for anything afterwards, which is obviously not ideal, seeing as Warren Burger sure isn’t an Earl Warren.
 
ACT ONE: Part 6
LIBERALS GAIN 8 HOUSE SEATS, DEMOCRATS 1 AT REPUBLICANS’ EXPENSE

THE AP, November 8th, 1978


DORNAN UNSEATED, PECK TO TAKE SEAT

After a close election, it appears that “B-1 Bob” Dornan has been defeated by just over a thousand votes by Carey Peck, the 29-year-old son of renowned actor Gregory Peck. Dornan has been known as a leading conservative firebrand in the House, as well as a close ally to President Reagan on military matters…

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, November 8th, 1978

Carey_Peck_1980.jpg

Above: Representative-Elect Carey Peck (D-CA-27)


BILL NELSON ELECTED IN 9TH DISTRICT

...Nelson is a moderate Democrat who has styled himself after Governor Askew…

THE TAMPA BAY TIMES, November 8th, 1978


GINGRICH LOSES THIRD BID FOR CONGRESS

...Mr. Gingrich has stated that he plans to return to teaching at West Georgia College, as, in his words, “third time apparently wasn’t the charm.” Gingrich was defeated by Virginia Shapard by nearly fifteen hundred votes yesterday...

THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, November 8th, 1978

article-2089497-0F8781F100000578-906_306x423.jpg

Above: Professor Gingrich concedes.


By far one of the best examples of the first far-right surge and reactions to it in the 1970s comes from Illinois, circa 1978. One of the most prominent moderate-to-liberal Republican Congressmen, John Anderson, was challenged by a televangelist named Don Lyon. Lyon was a hardline conservative and religious fundamentalist, fully evocative of President Reagan. Meanwhile, Anderson, despite his conservative past, was what many would consider an upper-class intellectual’s candidate due to his moderate economics and liberal social values. However, President Reagan unofficially supported Lyon, partially due to Anderson’s frosty relationship with his disciples. As such, Reagan dispatched the footsoldiers of the Moral Majority in the Illinois suburbs, including active campaigning by Reverend Jerry Falwell, Phyllis Schlafly, and other reactionary leaders. This paid off, with Lyon defeating Anderson within the primary by a narrow margin. However, Anderson wasn’t ready to take this defeat lying down. He promptly announced a bid for the Liberal Party nomination, and was practically handed the nomination by the party the next day. Due to Anderson’s crossover appeal with Democrats and Independents, as well as Lyon’s extreme beliefs (at one point calling for a constitutional amendment to ban abortion), he went on to narrowly claim the seat, now as a Liberal. Despite the underlying conservative tones in American society due to the tumultuous 1960s, by and large the people were uncomfortable with what Reaganism truly meant.

A PEOPLE’S HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 2nd edition written by Howard Zinn in 2009


“The best place to be in Maryland is on Mac Mathias’ coattails.”

Representative-Elect Lanny Davis (L-MD-6) when asked for comment about his victory, November 7th, 1978


OPINION: THE REPUBLICANS NEED TO GUARD THEIR LEFT

...New Jersey’s 9th District proves why the Republican party is a real danger as it continues to tack rightward. Despite the district’s Republican tendencies, Democrat Nick Mastorelli is going to be sworn in as its representative in January. This is not because Mastorelli was an excellent campaigner, but rather, the fact that a Liberal was on the ballot. His 234-vote margin, a bare plurality, is almost solely because of several thousand votes for a Liberal candidate in the District. Without this added impact on the Republicans, even assuming a generous amount of Liberal supporters vote Democratic, Mastorelli would have lost…

THE WASHINGTON POST, November 12th, 1978


LIBERAL GREEN TO REPRESENT EAST SIDE

...Notably, Congressman-Elect William Green competed in the primary with John V. Lindsay, narrowly defeating the former Mayor. However, Lindsay has remained undeterred by this loss, hinting at a potential bid for the Liberal Presidential nomination...

THE NEW YORK TIMES, November 8th, 1978

20100701152133_00001.jpg

Above: Fmr. Mayor John Lindsay (L-NY) at a press conference


LIBERAL SCHNEIDER BECOMES FIRST WOMAN TO REPRESENT RHODE ISLAND IN CONGRESS

THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL, November 8th, 1978


TOM DASCHLE ELECTED IN FIRST DISTRICT

THE RAPID CITY JOURNAL, November 8th, 1978


“Look, '78 is why Carroll and Strom are bothering with me. I worked on both of their campaigns, and I’m responsible for Carroll even winning and Strom’s landslide. Both of them know that, and I know both of them know that. The only reason you have a campaign to follow is that I’m calling in a couple a’ favors that Strom Thurmond, South Carolina’s fourth branch of government, and his party buddies owe me.”


Comments made by Lee Atwater to Michael Wolff in 1982, later published by Wolff in "Three Days in the Lion's Den" in 2015 following Atwater's death


David Letterman: So, in your book you talk a lot about being in the right place at the right time being key to politics. How does this relate to your career in Washington?
George W. Bush: David, as much as we talk about the smart people who win elections, as my numbers guys would tell you, it’s a crapshoot. I mean, I wanted to run for Congress in 1978. Yeah, I had talked it over with Laura, I was good to go.
DL: Well, then why didn’t you?
GB: My father wanted to talk to me about it. He had some concerns, mostly about the fact that both of our names were George. See, this was when he was Reagan’s Secretary of State. It was way too easy to make me look like a White House stooge, kinda like a chimp in Ronald Reagan’s lap.
[BOTH LAUGH]
GB: Also, things were looking real bad for Republicans that year. Really, it just wasn’t meant to be. So, after another talk with Laura, we agreed to wait a bit. Turns out that was probably a good idea. Can’t imagine I’d have gone anywhere on Capitol Hill if I didn’t.
DL: Speaking of going places in Washington, I just have to ask, seeing as the most recent theoretical Republican primary poll had you as the frontrunner at 57%, and since you’ve been notoriously slippery on this subject: definitively, are you or are you not running for President?
GB: You’re not going to get me that easy!
[BUSH WINKS, LETTERMAN LAUGHS]

Senate Majority Leader George W. Bush on The Tonight Show with David Letterman, February 23rd, 2011

03latenight1-articleLarge.png

Above: Senate Majority Leader George W. Bush (R-TX) on The Tonight Show


PAUL DEFEATS GAMMAGE IN REMATCH

...part of Ron Paul’s victory has been attributed to his popularity with local mothers. When asked for comment, Gammage stated that “we had some real difficulty making inroads with women, even through the ERA controversies. I mean, Dr. Paul’s delivered half of the babies in Brazoria County.” Representative-Elect Paul has not yet responded for comment...

THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE, November 8th, 1978


It would be wrong to touch on Dick Cheney’s early career in the House without discussing his allies. His oldest and most well-known is, of course, Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin. Upon William Steiger’s appointment as Secretary of Transportation, then-Wisconsin State Assembly Assistant Minority Leader Tommy Thompson immediately declared a run for the seat. In a bitterly contested Republican primary, Thompson narrowly prevailed and was subsequently elected to represent the heavily-Republican district. Due to Cheney’s highly secretive nature, we do not know the exact nature of their partnership, but we do know that, according to Thompson, Cheney reached out to him to organize his bloc of so-called “Pragmatic Conservatives” in 1978, a few months after Thompson entered the House. When asked for comment, Thompson said the following:

“Dick gave me a call sometime around February 1978, saying that we were in real danger of marginalization thanks to Reagan. Basically, he said he was going to try and stick a more quote-on-quote acceptable face on conservatism, and he wanted me at the forefront of it as a fellow freshman.”


THE POLITICS OF POWER: the Rise and Fall and Rise of Dick Cheney, published in 2017


Dan Rather: 1978 is generally considered to be the high electoral watermark for the Liberals, with gains in Congress and on the statewide level. Do you agree?
Lawrence Hogan: Somewhat. While Baltimore truly decimated the party, we still maintained a loyal core of supporters, and our incumbents didn’t ever really go anywhere.
DR: Yes, but polls show a sharp decline in Liberal Party registration after the 1980 Convention in Baltimore, then a gradual drop after that every year. Really, other than the few incumbents, Liberal candidates were not gaining votes-
LH: Nationally. Look at the polls in the key states for us.
DR: You mean states like Vermont? The largest city in Vermont has repeatedly elected a self-avowed socialist as its mayor, I truly doubt that this is evocative of the national mood towards the Liberals.
LH: Are you comparing us to socialists?
DR: No, but relative independence and willingness to buck the two major parties can’t be ignored.
LH: Either way, we still held nearly every Congressional seat we gained in 1978.
DR: But there were no major gains either. In fact, Liberal vote margins have only suffered as incumbents either retire or lose re-election, as it seems like people vote for Liberals because they’re popular incumbents-
LH: A third party in America even holding seats is a major accomplishment, Dan. When’s the last time you saw anyone who wasn’t a Democrat or Republican in Washington? I’m starting to wonder if this just another slam piece against there being a viable option that isn’t one or the other. You know better than to present this much bias against us.


60 Minutes Interview with Fmr. Mathias Campaign Manager Lawrence Hogan, 1987


HOUSE ELECTIONS: D CONTROL
  • Democrats: 290 (+1)
    • Speaker: Tip O’Neill (MA-8)
    • Majority Leader: Richard Bolling (MO-5)
    • Majority Whip: John Brademas (IN-3)
  • Republicans: 130 (-9)
    • Minority Leader: John Jacob Rhodes (AZ-2)
    • Minority Whip: Robert Michel (IL-18)
  • Liberals: 15 (+8)
    • Opposition Leader: Jim Jeffords (VT-AL)
    • Opposition Whip: Millicent Fenwick (NJ-5)

Author’s Note: If you have any questions about individual House races, feel free to ask. Yes, I did all 435 of them. No, I’m not sure if that qualifies as masochism, but it probably should.
 
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