The Battle at Dawn: The first battle between the United States and Japan December 7-10, 1941

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Just finished reading this...

...Impressed. But also narked. The most famous air raid was probably 617 Squadron's raid on the Ruhr Dams. Mind you, I'm British. Dolittle's raid did not achieve very much. Halvorsen could have done...

Otherwise - the raid on Hiroshima and the one Nagasaki ended WW2, so that probably is best choice. Ask any non-AH.com and you'll get those crucial nuke attacks. They also probably saved my father from dying on the beaches of Kyushu.
 
Just finished reading this...

...Impressed. But also narked. The most famous air raid was probably 617 Squadron's raid on the Ruhr Dams. Mind you, I'm British. Dolittle's raid did not achieve very much. Halvorsen could have done...

Otherwise - the raid on Hiroshima and the one Nagasaki ended WW2, so that probably is best choice. Ask any non-AH.com and you'll get those crucial nuke attacks. They also probably saved my father from dying on the beaches of Kyushu.
The Dolittle raid might not have done that much damage, but it did boost American morale. Also, it showed the Japanese that the home islands weren't that safe from attack.
 
The Dolittle raid might not have done that much damage, but it did boost American morale. Also, it showed the Japanese that the home islands weren't that safe from attack.

Plus it led to the plan to take Midway, which smashed Kido Butai and was the beginning of the end for the IJN...
 
The mark of a really good timeline...

...is one which is so well written and well researched that I can still enjoy it even when I might disagree with a point of departure or a particular butterfly.

And I've enjoyed *all* of your Pacific War timelines, @galveston bay , and this is really the only one where I couldn't really find the POD plausible - and yet, what a fun read it was, exploring some striking possibilities of such an (in)famous day. You did your homework.

(My sense of the literature is that Richardson really wasn't more aggressive than Kimmel, was equally unable to take seriously the possibility of Japanese air attack, and equally blind spotted on riding herd on the Army to provide adequate security for the base; had he remained as CINCPAC, I think - as does Prange - that Pearl Harbor happens roughly as it did in OTL. And yet, his relief by FDR was certainly unjust; even if his objection to basing at Pearl was based mostly on logistics, had he been heeded, Yamamoto would have been forced to find a very different way to kick off the Pacific War, and a lot of American servicemen's lives might have been spared. But this timeline does help illustrate what more aggressive and imaginative leadership at Oahu *could* have accomplished, regardless of whether Richardson was the man to supply it or not.)
 
The mark of a really good timeline...

...is one which is so well written and well researched that I can still enjoy it even when I might disagree with a point of departure or a particular butterfly.

And I've enjoyed *all* of your Pacific War timelines, @galveston bay , and this is really the only one where I couldn't really find the POD plausible - and yet, what a fun read it was, exploring some striking possibilities of such an (in)famous day. You did your homework.

(My sense of the literature is that Richardson really wasn't more aggressive than Kimmel, was equally unable to take seriously the possibility of Japanese air attack, and equally blind spotted on riding herd on the Army to provide adequate security for the base; had he remained as CINCPAC, I think - as does Prange - that Pearl Harbor happens roughly as it did in OTL. And yet, his relief by FDR was certainly unjust; even if his objection to basing at Pearl was based mostly on logistics, had he been heeded, Yamamoto would have been forced to find a very different way to kick off the Pacific War, and a lot of American servicemen's lives might have been spared. But this timeline does help illustrate what more aggressive and imaginative leadership at Oahu *could* have accomplished, regardless of whether Richardson was the man to supply it or not.)

Thank you

I am hoping I got around some of those objections to Richardson with the Fleet Problem XXII chapter
 
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