That Wacky Redhead

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Brainbin, Nov 18, 2011.

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  1. Threadmarks: 1973-74: Brave New World

    Brainbin Kingpin of the Cultural Cartel

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    Brave New World (1973-74)

    Who loves ya, baby?

    NYPD Lt. Theodore "Teddy" Kojack (Telly Savalas), Kojack

    Desilu, at the beginning of the 1973-74 season, had four series on the air: Mannix, Night Gallery, The Way of the Warrior, and Re-Genesis. A fifth series, Rock Around the Clock, would premiere in mid-season, as a reaction to the smash success of American Graffiti. However, Re-Genesis was failing to attract audiences, who found the fish-out-of-water aspects of the series unappealing, and the setting in general lacking in the sense of wonderment and adventure that had so defined Star Trek. It didn
    t help matters that showrunner Gene Roddenberry had largely left the show to its own devices while working on another pitch he had previously been promised, which eventually evolved into a pilot movie called The Questor Tapes. The premise featured an advanced android, the last of a long line built by an ancient alien race, whose mission was to protect mankind, though without their knowledge; while, at the same time, desiring to learn more about humanity. It was the final culmination of a story idea that Roddenberry had been developing for several years. [1] Gene L. Coon had co-written the Questor pilot, which would air on January 23, 1974, on NBC; he had also written the series bible. Though he was dying of terminal lung cancer at the time the pilot movie was shot, it was decided that he would be credited as the co-creator of the show. Roddenberry was displeased that 50% of the creator royalties would thus be siphoned off to the Coon estate, but many of those at Desilu found it entirely appropriate. [2]

    One last idea had caught the attention of Desilu: Jim Henson, creator of the Muppets, and a consulting puppeteer on Star Trek (whose moving performance of the sehlat character, I-Chaya, had imbued the classic episode “Yesteryear” with such pathos and vulnerability), having exhausted all of his other options, finally approached “The House That Paladin Built”. He had good reason to be hesitant, for he had devised a variety series that would star his Muppet creations, and Desilu had never before produced a such a program. Indeed, Lucille Ball was a firm believer in comedy as a deliberate and thoroughly rehearsed process; it remained one of the few major disappointments of her producing career when her friend Carol Burnett had declined to star in a sitcom vehicle for Desilu, instead opting to star in her own variety series, which had been running since 1967.

    Herb F. Solow had explained all of this when Henson had tentatively approached him in 1972, in the midst of the studio’s plans for expansion, with the idea. Given the wealth of other potential projects, his proposal was politely declined, and he was forced to go elsewhere. Meanwhile, Desilu continued to boom, thanks in large part to the continuous cash receipts from Star Trek, complemented nicely by the new wave of syndication revenues from the recently-cancelled (and
    “stripped”) Mission: Impossible. This opened the door for yet more pilots the following year. One slot had been promised to Roddenberry, as part of the Re-Genesis deal, and another space was suddenly filled when Rock Around the Clock got the green-light, but there would still be room for one more. Solow, who liked Henson and believed that his idea had a great deal of potential, agreed to develop a pilot. Lucille Ball, for her part, was highly reluctant to approve The Muppet Show, but was finally convinced when Henson explained that the “variety show”, far from being spontaneous and live-on-the-air, would be meticulously written and rehearsed, filmed in the traditional three-camera format, and would even interlink the variety material with sitcom-style, behind-the-scenes segments. This convinced Ball to go ahead with the pilot movie, which would air on January 30, 1974, on ABC; [3] a full season order was beyond even Ball’s considerable powers, as that was the way so many television series were sold in the 1970s.

    It was to her pleasant surprise, then, that both pilot movies were very well-received, by critics and audiences alike, and were picked up for full-season orders. By the end of the season, Desilu would have six series in production: Mannix, Night Gallery, The Way of the Warrior, Rock Around the Clock, The Questor Tapes, and The Muppet Show – the most since the studio’s heyday in the early 1960s. (Re-Genesis had been cancelled due to low ratings, continuing a worrying trend of all non-anthology, non-import science-fiction series since Star Trek failing to last for more than one season). Assuming that they were able to maintain their present level of success, this diversity of programming, along with the resources at the studio’s disposal (in particular their spacious backlot), and the wide array of alternative income sources (such as merchandising and post-production services), Desilu was poised to emerge as one of the most powerful studios in Hollywood, even in the face of the strongest recession in decades. Paramount, on the other hand, was increasingly forced to contract as Desilu expanded, given their shared studio space, under the terms of the original 1967 contract between the two companies. It was not the first time that Gulf+Western chief executive Charles Bluhdorn bitterly regretted that he had been unable to convince Ball to sell her studio.

    Paramount also was facing a major public-relations problem. The birth rate, previously in a steep decline, had recovered somewhat from its late-1960s doldrums; though certainly not restored to Baby Boom levels, the appreciable increase of the early 1970s would later be described by demographers and sociologists as the “mini-boom” or the “boomlet”. But Paramount was a studio that seemed resolutely committed to portraying the lives of singletons, or childless couples. [4] None of the many single characters on Mary Tyler Moore were in so much as long-term relationships, and indeed one of the show’s few married regulars, Lou Grant, had separated from his wife. The prohibition imposed on Bob Newhart by the eponymous star against children held firm, even though, in that case, the writers were more than willing to populate the show with progeny. But Barefoot in the Park remained the most visible example of what social critics described as the “anti-family” policies at Paramount. Finally caving to public pressure – or, more likely, network pressure, as Barefoot was the studio’s lowest-rated sitcom – the lead couple became pregnant in the 1972-73 season, delivering their baby, a son named Grant, after Paramount Television head Grant Tinker, in the season finale (“Grant was always the biggest baby”, his wife Mary Tyler Moore joked on the choice of name). The subsequent season then made raising a child the central focus of the series. Ratings did not appreciably improve, however, and it would be the last in the five-season run of Barefoot. Room 222, the other inaugural Paramount Television series, would also last five seasons, leaving the studio with only four shows in production at the end of the 1973-74 season: Mary Tyler Moore, Bob Newhart, The Odd Couple, and the newly-developed Mary Tyler Moore spinoff Rhoda, which (to stave off further complaints) featured its lead character entering into a steady relationship with a divorced father in the pilot, with plans for them to marry before the end of the first season.

    Desilu and Paramount were far from the only studios in Hollywood, of course. Norman Lear’s studio, Tandem, naturally addressed social concerns the most directly, and bluntly. Those Were The Days, which had always sought to reflect the lives of those people it claimed to represent, also featured a pregnancy storyline. Gloria was discovered to be pregnant in late 1973, during her husband’s final year of graduate school. The child was delivered on March 16, 1974, the exact same day as her husband’s graduation ceremony, to the expected hijinks. Adding the baby character – also a son, named Michael, after the original “Richard” analogue from Til Death Us Do Part – was described by some commentators as “penance” for the hugely controversial and infamous abortion storyline in Maude. [5] Norman Lear vehemently denied these insinuations, but there was an ulterior motive to the addition of baby Michael. Once the Oil Crisis had hit, the original raison d’être of Those Were the Days – to promote the positive change brought about by modern society – found itself quickly becoming obsolete. Times were tough, and Carroll O’Connor knew that, in order to keep Those Were the Days fresh and relevant, it would have to pull back on the preaching and emphasize stronger characterization. At least in the short-term, it worked, as Those Were the Days repeated for the third consecutive season as the top-rated show on television. Sanford and Son also maintained its position at #2; Maude, on the other hand, fell out of the Top Ten. [6]

    Universal Television, one of the more successful small-screen subsidiaries of a movie studio, launched an intriguing new action-adventure program named Kojack, which starred veteran Greek-American character actor Telly Savalas, best known for his completely bald head. Once again, the series started life as a pilot movie, adapted from the notorious real-life
    “Career Girls” murders of 1963. The resulting series would frequently dramatize institutionalized discrimination, and the delicate balancing act between the rights of the suspect and the duties of the police to effectively investigate crimes. Despite these stirring ethical questions, the show functioned largely as a star vehicle for the suave and charismatic Savalas. The actor had once portrayed James Bonds arch-nemesis, Ernst Stavro Blofeld; but his character here certainly had the same effortless appeal of 007, with his famous catchphrase: Who loves ya, baby? The program became an instant hit, and the top-rated new show of the season, finishing at #5 overall. [7]

    As always, the studios and their measures of success differed quite sharply from those of the networks. NBC was doing moderately well, though still down somewhat from their highs in the late 1960s and early 1970s; and increasingly reliant on their reputation as the network of
    Negroes, Blacks, and Coloreds, which fueled great ambivalence among executives. Sanford remained their biggest hit, with Flip Wilson also finishing in the Top 10 (the Peacock network having four representatives total within those ranks). The Bill Cosby Show also remained in the Top 30, one of nine such shows on the network. CBS had the other six Top 10 shows, including the #1 show on the air, and four of the Top Five. Altogether, the network had eleven shows in the Top 30. [8] The remaining ten shows in the Top 30 naturally aired on ABC, though for the second season in a row, they were once again shut out of the Top 10 (their top-rated show – also Desilus top-rated show – was the mid-season replacement, Rock Around the Clock, at #12; they also aired the studios only other Top 30 hit, The Way of the Warrior, at #27). [9] But desperate times often called for desperate measures; and willingness to take risks had always distinguished the Alphabet Network, with The Muppet Show being only the most recent example.

    At that season’s Emmy Awards, Mary Tyler Moore edged out Those Were the Days to win Outstanding Comedy Series. It would be the second series win for the show. The eponymous lead actress also won for Outstanding Lead Actress, though all other acting awards within the Comedy category went to the cast of Those Were the Days: Carroll O’Connor for Lead Actor, Richard Dreyfuss for Supporting Actor, and Penny Marshall for Supporting Actress. [10] On the Drama side of the ledger, Kojack, the breakout hit of the season, and Telly Savalas, its star, won the Emmys for Series and Lead Actor respectively. [11] The Carol Burnett Show repeated for Outstanding Variety Series.

    ---

    [1] IOTL, an earlier iteration of what eventually became Questor was known as
    “Assignment: Earth”, which Roddenberry independently attempted to sell, but had no luck. He would then rework the pilot script into a backdoor pilot, which marked the finale of the second season of Star Trek. None of this happens ITTL, because Star Trek did well enough that Roddenberry didnt see the need to sell “Assignment: Earth” (as Star Trek was considered a sure bet for cancellation before all those fan letters started coming in).

    [2] Why? Because Roddenberry had quite deviously arranged to write lyrics to the Theme from Star Trek, whose melody was written by Alexander Courage, over vehement objection from the latter (after all, said lyrics – leaving aside any objections as to their quality – were never used, to the point that Courage alone is usually credited for the composition of the song). Coon, though co-writing the pilot IOTL, was credited only for the teleplay; his several additional months of life permit him a more active role in the show
    s development ITTL, to the point that a case for his co-creator status can be made (and is made, by his friends Solow and Justman, Desilus attorneys, and the WGA).

    [3] The first of two pilot specials for what would eventually become The Muppet Show aired on this date IOTL. It was called
    “The Muppets Valentine Show”, and featured Mia Farrow. Note that ABC is in far more dire straits ITTL, and is thus willing to take a chance on a full-season commitment (with prodding from the higher-ups at Desilu, that is).

    [4] This is a trend that carries over from MTM shows IOTL, and here is amplified by applying it to at least one native Paramount production (Barefoot). The “childfree” policy on MTM was presumably due to the like-minded decision by Grant Tinker and Mary Tyler Moore to have no children of their own (both had children from previous marriages). They could have decided differently ITTL, given the atmosphere of the early 1970s, but assuming that they hold to their OTL decision allows for a more intriguing juxtaposition.

    [5] Yes, the abortion storyline happened more-or-less on schedule IOTL. And as to specifics with regards to landmark rulings related to that subject ITTL… I’ll let you know about those right after I fill you in on the membership of the Humphrey Cabinet. (And if you still feel the need to discuss the subject, may I kindly direct you to the Chat forum?)

    [6] IOTL, Sanford was at #3, behind The Waltons (ITTL, Spencer’s Mountain, which here finishes at #3), and Maude was #6 (one of the shows it finished behind was M*A*S*H, at #4). Maude fares more poorly here because it is a show about wealthy suburbanites, compared to the other two Tandem shows, which have working-class protagonists.

    [7] Kojack finished at #7 IOTL, still enough to be the highest-rated new show of the season (the one remaining Top Five show ITTL is Hawaii Five-O at #4).

    [8] In the 1973-74 season IOTL, CBS had a whopping seventeen shows in the Top 30, and nine in the Top 10 alone, including the top-rated All in the Family (and now you see why Fred Silverman was so revered); ABC followed with nine in the Top 30, though they were (once again) shut out of the Top 10 (the mid-season replacement The Six Million Dollar Man was their highest-rated show at #11); and NBC carried a mere four shows in the Top 30, though they did manage one show in the Top 10, preventing CBS from pulling off a clean sweep: Sanford and Son at #3 (and now you see why NBC was in such dire straits in the 1970s). Among the shows on the air IOTL that were not ITTL: Here
    s Lucy (never aired), Gunsmoke (cancelled in 1971), and M*A*S*H (never aired). Note that all three of these shows were in the Top 30 and aired on CBS.

    [9] Happy Days finished at #16 in its inaugural season IOTL; Kung Fu, as ITTL, was at #27. Night Gallery was cancelled in 1973 (after a prolonged power struggle between Serling and producers, which does not happen here), Genesis II never aired as a regular series, and Mannix failed to reach the Top 30 (as ITTL).

    [10] IOTL, M*A*S*H won for Outstanding Comedy Series and for Lead Actor (Alan Alda). Rob Reiner did win Supporting Actor, whereas Cloris Leachman won for Supporting Actress. The pregnancy storyline gives both O’Connor and Marshall far more Emmy bait relative to OTL storylines, which allows them both (and Marshall in particular) to edge out the competition – Jack Klugman and Leachman, respectively (Leachman quite transparently won because of the episode in which she discovers that her husband is cheating on her with Sue Ann Nivens – I couldn’t avoid giving her the Oscar, but at least I’ve taken one of her many undeserved Emmys away).

    [11] Savalas also won IOTL, but the Series Emmy went to Upstairs, Downstairs.

    ---

    Despite considerable changes in the outside world, day-to-day life in Hollywood remains much the same; the people of the industry are rather cloistered on those pedestals of theirs. That said, production companies are as accountable to the fickle whims of the public as any other business, even if they are not so willing to record their assets, liabilities, revenues, or expenses in anything remotely resembling an honest or transparent manner. If this update was intended to get any particular theme across, that would be the one. Of course, economic downturns usually take some time to sink in to the popular consciousness, so we will continue to see major changes in the next broadcast season.

    One of several demographic changes I
    ’ve posited for this timeline is the “mini-boom” of the early 1970s. Births usually tend to rise with the conclusion of foreign entanglements, and with a good economy, both of which are in evidence here. Also, a large cohort of people are coming of age, and more of them relative to OTL are choosing to settle down and start a family. Obviously, the mitigating factors of OTL (widespread birth control, environmentalism, womens liberation, etc.) are in evidence, and act as ballast to prevent the birthrate from returning to Baby Boom levels. My rough estimate would be an average of 20 births per 1,000 throughout the early 1970s. This is why the Koenigs (among many other OTL couples) decided lets have one more, which is a fairly common expression in the era. Several of my readers could quite possibly have a younger sibling ITTL.

    Also, a clerical note: from this point forward, the names of all television series will be listed in italics, rather than quotation marks (excluding featured shows like Star Trek). This adds consistency, and is easier to type (even IMDb, which formerly used quotation marks for television series, appears to have abandoned them). Thank you all for your patience, and for your tireless discussion even in the absence of new material. The next update, our return to a beloved British franchise, should be ready in the next few days.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2012
  2. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    A nice solid update. I find it very likely that Re-Genesis would be a one-season wonder (not even Desilu was likely to nurse that through to three seasons). I am glad, however, to see the Questor Tapes which I found fascinating as a movie when I was young - I hope the series does well enough at least to make it to three seasons and thus more success in syndication.

    It's nice for many to see Kojak show up, though I think an actual Kojak series was more perturbable than most (not necessarily that Savales wouldn't have had a vehicle, maybe even a cop one), but I think it is still in the realm of possibility that it comes about.

    I'm actually a bit surprised that the Muppet Show went to Desilu. Not disappointed, mind, just surprised.

    I am also a bit surprised to see Mannix hanging in there - but then again, I am really not familiar with the OTL series, so can't comment as much.

    I think you need to get NBC some diversification of hits.
     
  3. John Fredrick Parker Donor

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    Splendid update! Nice to see demographic changes in an ATL...
     
  4. vultan Defying Gravity

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    Brilliant update!

    Particularly like the stuff on Jim Henson. Aside from The Muppets Show, I'd like to return to the question of his work on Star Trek with the creature design. I must wonder, in our timeline Henson is primarily remembered for the Muppets and Sesame Street, even though his work with more realistic animatronics is still felt even to this day by way of the Creature Shop. I wonder, if he could form a creature shop analogue earlier than OTL, and start doing even more extensive work in TV and the movies, could he have a popular legacy that more accurately reflects the full body of his work?

    (Of course, this would all rely on there being enough sci-fi and fantasy movies during the remainder of his natural life for him to work on. It'd be fairly easy to butterfly away his relatively early death, though you've already said the timeline would end before 1990 anyway, so that would be almost irrelevant. The text of the timeline has already made it clear that the late 1970's won't be friendly for at least televised genre material, although that wouldn't rule out movies.

    Aside from this timeline's version of Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica, and maybe a Kubrickian LOTR franchise, which Henson could work on, maybe an earlier version of Farscape? A serious sci-fi and/or fantasy show that features a large number of the cast either portrayed by actors in heavy prosthetics or extremely life-like puppets, produced by Jim Henson to really show how far his work could go? He could try it out if buoyed by the success of The Muppet Show. Then again, if it's produced in the near future of the timeline, it would more than likely end up as a pilot that's not picked up for a full series order.

    Wow. I just realized that this text in parentheses was a lot longer than I'd originally intended.) :eek:

    Anyway, about the mini-boom in birth rates. I assume that, in addition to it not being as numerically significant as the Baby Boom, it's also a lot shorter, sandwiched between the tumultuous 1960's and the crappy economy of the mid-to-late 1970's.

    Again, it's really interesting how Brainbin's been able to trace the deep political and social impact of a more successful Star Trek. For want of a nail indeed! (Let's just hope he doesn't go all Fear, Loathing, and Gumbo on the Campaign Trail '72 or For All Time on us and make us regret it!):eek:

    Keep up the fantastic work, Brainbin!:)
     
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  5. Orville_third Banned

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    As always, a fascinating and detailed story! I wish I was as versed on the ins and outs of TV as you are.
     
  6. NCW8 Being Analogue in a Digital World

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    Interesting post - I wonder what Lew Grade and ATV will do without the Muppet Show. Being made in the US, the show is obviously going to have a different list of Guest stars (for example I'd guess that Bruce Forsyth wouldn't appear).

    Speaking of Dr Who and the Mini-Boom - IOTL Connie Booth and John Cleese had a daughter in Feb 1971. Presumably, Connie's appearance on Dr Who will have changed that.

    I also wonder what happened to Katy Manning's career ITTL. Presumably she remained a theatre actress. There obviously won't be that infamous photo-shoot with a Dalek ITTL !

    Cheers,
    Nigel.
     
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  7. e of pi Layers on Top of Layers

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    So essentially this Mini-boom is of similar proportions to the Echo Boom that produced the Millenials (though obviously the character of the generation will be very different, they both seem to be of similar size)? Hmm. A larger generation in the early to mid 70s (smaller but at least comparable to the Boomers) would seem to dilute some of the cutlural effects that the dominance of the Boomers has had IOTL, which could be interesting. For instance (and I know this is way beyond the scope of the TL, but it's what occurs to me) there'd be less issue with the Boomers all turning 65 near the same time and starting to collect Social Security if there's a ~15-20 year young cohort of at least comparable size that's still at its prime working years. Obviously about 40 years away from the present moment of the TL, and about 25-30 years beyond the end you've set for the coverage, but it occurs to me. It's an interesting (perhaps even intriguing) demographic effect.
     
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  8. Falkenburg CMII & Bar Monthly Donor

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    Intriguing as ever, Brainbin. :cool:

    Kojak and The Muppets make it to air. Who loves ya BB? We do! :D

    Hopefully Grade still takes a hand with The Muppets, even if only as overseas distributor.
    Otherwise there could be negative consequences for the Henson Movies (Muppet Movie/Dark Crystal).
    Mind you, if TMS is successful I'm sure someone would want a piece of the action.

    Off to work now with This (or This) in my head. :)
    Slainte!

    Falkenburg
     
  9. NCW8 Being Analogue in a Digital World

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    Yes it would be good to see him get credit for something a bit more serious. Maybe if Desilu produces Terry Nation's Dalek pilot, he could get to work on that.

    Mind you, the image that pops into my head is something like this:

    It's time to launch the Rockets.
    It's time to evacuate.
    It's time to flee the Daleks,
    Before they Exterminate!


    Cheers,
    Nigel
     
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  10. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    Let me join the chorus of praise.:) Nice work, as usual. (I think I'd be surprised if it wasn't.;))

    I never noticed the "childless" shows trend, tho (at the time) I did like the fact Mary & Rhoda weren't the seeming cliche "married with kids". Nor was Maude the cliche wife. (I especially liked her.:))
     
  11. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

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    Nigel - sang this to my kids - they liked it.

    Note, I'm pretty sure we're one of the few households in the US to have toy sonic screwdrivers and remote control daleks.:D
     
  12. PW MAX Member

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    Another awesome update, as per usual. I'm really looking forward to the 1980s and 90s, myself. Curious to see what the future holds for Star Trek, and curious to see what'll become of shows like SeaQuest DSV and Babylon 5 as well.

    :)
     
  13. Orville_third Banned

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  14. vultan Defying Gravity

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    SeaQuest and Babylon 5 are both almost certainly butterflied away, I'm afraid. Doesn't mean the cast and crew won't have other work, though.

    (By the 1980's, all eyes are on J. Michael Straczynski...)
     
  15. Orville_third Banned

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    Does he still write "The Complete Book of Scriptwriting"? (I have a copy- and it's excellent!)
     
  16. phx1138 Bocagiste troll

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    :cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:

    I haven't seen anything so bad since...IDK when.:confused:
     
  17. Barbarossa Rotbart Well-Known Member

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    I believe that JMS will still create Babylon 5. But it is also possible that he is not forced to change certain plot elements of the series.
     
  18. stevep Member

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    Barbarossa Rotbart

    That would be great. Very much my favourite SF series of the 90's largely because it had a pretty consistent plot, rather than a number of separate episodes vaguely in the same universe which is the plague of most SF TV series.

    Agree with what others have said about an excellent update. I have forgotten about the lolly-pop addict, a real blast from the past. Also good to see the Muppets surviving.:D

    Steve
     
  19. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

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    That Whacky Redhead

    Finally caught up on this timeline. Great job. Love the 5 season Star Trek and Doctor Who on commercial Televison in primetime. I think that Tom Baker Doctor would be even more popular than Jon Pertwee.

    A few Questions:
    Does George Pal suceed in bringing his War of the World TV series to the air in this timeline?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E1zOXarLk4
    Does Pal release his sequel to the Time Machine, that he planned with Ray Harryhausen? (I read the book that came out in the late 1970's and would have love to have seen a movie of it)
    Did Pal remaind as the Producer for Logan Run the movie?
    How does this change the TV show?

    What other British Sci fi Show make primetime?
    Doomwatch might with it ecological plots. I could see it as a midseason replacement. In the OTL Detective shows like Department S and Strange Reports and My Partner the Ghost aired as midseason replacement, so it not unlikly that Doomwatch would air in the US.
    Another possibility would be Survivors. The 1970 post apocalyptic series created by Terry Nation.
    Blake Seven is another possibility. I would hope that it would have better sets and Special effects and maybe shot on film instead of Video. If the BBC had more sells to the US with Science Fiction shows, than it would be more likley to spend more on new shows. ( I worte a Timeline in which Terry Nation , Chris Boucher, and the producer David Maloney are brought to the US to work on the Buck Roger Show in the Late 70's. It would be much darker and feature the best elements of Blake Seven, which was never made.)

    I could also see the series Out of the Unknown being sucessfully syndicated to US to compete with Twilight Zone and Outer limit. It would be heavly edited to fit a one hour slot, but since many of the remaining episodes are very slow, it might help many of the episodes. (The show was one of those that had most of the episodes distroy in the 1970's)

    The BBC considered severals Sci fi series in the 1970's that were never made in the OTL.
    First is the Doctor Who Spin-offs. The Unit series was consider in the early 1970's (It was consider as both a spin-off and a replacement for Doctor Who) Most likley it would have been produced by Douglas Camfield.
    Another Doctor Who spin-off considered was a Jago and Dr Lightfoot series based on characters who appear in the episode The Talons of Weng-Chiang. It would have taken place in Victorian London. (Big Finish is currently doing Audio adaptions with these characters)

    Terry Nation did a pilot for a sci fi series called the Incredible Robert Baldick, about a another Victorian Detective played by Robert Hardy that invesigating a Ghost, discovered advance tech was behind the ghost
    http://www.survivors-mad-dog.org.uk/MD_Baldick_Story.html
    I think it would have been in interesting series.

    The BBC also considered remaking the Quartermass Series from the 1950's in color. They went so far as doing some Special effect test for the show in the OTL.

    And the BBC also consider doing adaptions of Verne and Wells novels . These episodes might have aired in the US as part of Public Broadcasting Masterpiece theater. (Just don't mess with I Claudius) The nearest they came to making any was a 6 part adaption of Wells' The Invisible Man written by Our old friend Terry Nation in the 1980's.

    ITV television in Britain aired a show in the early 1970's called the Rivals of Sherlock Holmes which feature adaption of victorians detectives stories.
    It would have been interesting to see some of the Detectives as full series. The most interesting one IMHO would have been William Hope Hodgson's Carnacki, starting Donald Pleasence. I would have love to see that as a full series.
    The one episode that they did with Carnacki is currently here
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JvunsCiyEg

    I am looking forward to futher parts of this timeline.
    Patrick
     
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  20. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Rockne O'Bannion not only created SeaQuest but also Alien Nation and Farscape. It is highly likely that we will see quality SF movies and TV from him, though they may only have a passing resemblance to the OTL shows. However I suspect the exploits of Ballard will still increase interest in undersea stuff and it is within the realm of possibility that O'Bannion still creates an underwater SF series.

    With regard to my beloved B5, J. Michael is still likely ITTL to get into TV at which point he is likely to think about how to keep costs on an SF series down which is likely to lead him to the space station idea for a series. He also by nature seems to like long story/plot archs so that is likely to be seen as well. He probably will come up something akin to B5.

    These two shows have people who seem tempermentallyinclinedto craft good SF show and so we will probably see their work ITTL with some parallels in plots and settings and archtypes though the names looks and cast as well as timing will be far different.
     
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