Moving and interesting conversation between Maria and Lang. It might help ease some of her frustration if she was allowed access to report on those stories that could be reported. I am not sure if this could happen. She could be be an unofficial- officially approved thorn in the governments side.
 
Moving and interesting conversation between Maria and Lang. It might help ease some of her frustration if she was allowed access to report on those stories that could be reported. I am not sure if this could happen. She could be be an unofficial- officially approved thorn in the governments side.
I agree,
It comes out as too naive. Or maybe she is naive. But They would have to (be ready to) give her (or Grossman) something as well as doing the right thing.
Making deals is standard journalism, but giving up a story is unethical for a journalist.
Or maybe several small things
 
I agree,
It comes out as too naive. Or maybe she is naive. But They would have to (be ready to) give her (or Grossman) something as well as doing the right thing.
Making deals is standard journalism, but giving up a story is unethical for a journalist.
Or maybe several small things
I would maybe use 'unprofessional'. I can't see not publishing a story that may bring harm to innocent people as unethical. Unprofessional, yes, but not unethical.
(I'm not referring to the case in point, but about the idea in general.)
 
Something relevant to this is that it's easy to put a thoroughly American spin on journalistic integrity, governmental transparency, and free speech. But one reason it is so distinctly American is that we've had the luxury of largely being a principal fighting colonial wars on our turf and have had significantly weaker neighbors on our borders and two truly massive oceans protecting us.

This German Empire is very strong, but surrounded by conflicts and potential conflicts. The Soviet threat is obviously a scary one, and is an existential threat, as evidenced by the comment that they're not sure they can win it.

Being promised the big lead and the most leash when it can be published or does get out is worth waiting for in this situation.
 
Part 15, Chapter 157
Chapter One Hundred Fifty-Seven


3rd February, 1938

Berlin

A dark cloud was hovering over the bullpen as Maria sat fuming at her desk. She had been intercepted by Grossmann after she had walked out of the club the night before and had a short, sharp discussion that was anything but civil. Grossmann had called her an idealist which was just shy of calling her naive. Grossmann had also warned her the old censorship laws were still in place having never been directly repealed or adjudicated. This was not the story that the BT wanted risk making a run at the Courts over so if she got herself arrested then she’d be on her own.

Then Grossmann had told her the absolutely worst part. Emil Holz had been in the room listening in on the whole conversation and she’d not noticed him. It had been Emil not Grossmann who Lang had been doing the favor for. They’d realized that she would never back off unless she was given a proper explanation.

There was the promise that when the time was right they would have the exclusive on the story but that was cold comfort considering the likely scenario in which that would happen. Holtz, Grossmann, Lang, the Editor of features at the BT were all making her life difficult and all of them had one thing in common, all men. Ernest Hemingway had once joked that Maria spent her vacations on the Isle of Lesbos after she had rebuffed his advances. Sort of ironic considering that he would later be partially responsible for making sure no one in the world thought that was true. She had not been amused by that stupid joke but there were times when it would make her life considerably easier.


Putlos, Germany

How do you roll over a Panzer III? That was the question that Kurt was left with as he and Olli set the chains and cables. The panzer had also filled with water during the brief thaw the day before that had turned to ice wrecking the interior. The consequence of the high water table hereabouts. There would be Hell to pay for the crew when they towed it back to base. They had spent most of the winter in a Bergepanzer III before finally being reassigned to a new Bergepanzer V, the recovery vehicle having arrived from Henshel ahead of the Panzerkampfwagen V prototype that was due to arrive at any time.

Kurt had tried to obliquely talk to the Hauptmann about letting them into the Panzer V project. The Hauptmann had shut that all down by saying that if Kurt really wanted to volunteer for something the LPz always needed warm bodies. He’d bolted from that. The Luftpanzer project was generally regarded as suicide to anyone that knew anything about it. The Heer wanted a light scout panzer and the Luftwaffe wanted armor they could, in theory, dump out of an airplane. It had been constructed with largely off the shelf parts. The turret and engine from a SPz-II mated to the smallest possible hull.

There was also the minor detail of there being a Para General out there who possibly had a score to settle with Kurt and Olli. If they joined the LPz project they would end up indirectly under that Generals thumb.

Compared to that the Bergepanzer V wasn’t that bad and the recovery efforts had given them quite an education in what not to do with Panzers of any type. As Kurt walked back towards the Bergepanzer he watched as the cables on the A-frame went taunt. Olli didn’t mind this sort of work, it was very similar to what he had been doing with tractors on his family’s farm just on a different scale. The new Bergepanzer had dwarfed the vehicle it had replaced, it weighed in at a staggering 40 tons and had required a special rail car to move. The wench and A-frame had replaced the tripod. An axillary power unit, a full tool kit including air compressors and impact wrenches were also included. Where everything on the BPz-III had felt improvised this had felt like the exact opposite.

Kurt climbed up the glacis, it was set at an oddly tilted angle. At the very front of the bow one could see where the top and bottom plates had been welded together. Fingers of steel sticking into a pie is how Olli had had characterized it. Kurt dropped down through the commander’s hatch, he made a point of being inside before they did one of these lifts. The first time they had done this with this particular vehicle Axel had torqued it. The 900 horsepower from the opposed diesel engine was not what he was used to and it had proven far more responsive, sports car vs school bus as it were. Kurt and Olli had been standing on the other side of the Panzer so hadn’t been in the path of the cable that snapped, it did cut down a good-sized tree that was in its path.

Kurt watched as the Panzer III was pulled back upright. He could see that the 13mm and its mount were a total loss having been crushed. That probably meant that the optics in the cupola would have to be messed up as well. This was growing more expensive by the second. There was no talking as they folded the A-frame back flat to the roof the Bergepanzer and rigged the Panzer to be towed. All three of them were tired of Winter, of having the worst job in this outfit and of each other.

As they headed back towards base Kurt dozed in his seat. The overlapped road wheels and torsion-bar suspension of the Bergepanzer V might be a pain in the ass from a maintenance perspective but it did make for a smooth ride. There had been a lot of speculation about what the Panzer V would look like and what had happened to the Panzer IV?
 
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I hope that Maria is given some juicy stories to help ease her frustration. Things have set her back and irked her temper. Emil may get a lashing if he runs into her any time soon.

I am enjoying the stories of Kurt and Olli. We learn through their eyes some of the changes happening to Panzers and how the screw ups of others will be helpful if/when they are back in a tank. This may help prevent them from making them in the future and earn them brownie points with their future commanders.
 
I would maybe use 'unprofessional'. I can't see not publishing a story that may bring harm to innocent people as unethical. Unprofessional, yes, but not unethical.
(I'm not referring to the case in point, but about the idea in general.)
That was written with some ironi. Special journalist ethics.
Also, Think how poorly it fits the description of Grossman.
 
Part 15, Chapter 158
Chapter One Hundred Fifty-Eight


20th April, 1938

Rechlin-Lärz Airfield

Oberfähnrich Lenz Schultz was seated in the cockpit of the airplane he had volunteered to fly. After he’d returned from Spain things around his old squadron had gotten strange. The Hauptmann had cracked down on many of the bad habits that they had acquired while in the field. Then word had come down that the Stuka along with the Heinkel He-112 were being relegated to advanced trainer status as soon as more advanced production aircraft arrived. This had caused a stir, every pilot in the Squadron had wanted in on getting a crack at those new airplanes.

The new fighter that Heinkel had been working on had hit a snag, they had the fastest production aircraft in the world but it’s evaporative cooling system had proved troublesome resulting in long delays in the project. Junkers had been forced to junk the planned Stuka replacement that was rumored have a hydraulically operated turret among other things. Instead they had opted for an aerodynamically refined and considerably lightened aircraft.

It had been the airplane that Lenz was sitting in that had changed everything. Focke-Wulf had stolen a march on the competition by producing a simpler design that was nonetheless a world beater. This had killed or resulted in vast changes to existing projects, most notably the replacement for the Stuka. The 14-cylinder engine that Bramo had cooked up had been monopolized by the latest and most advanced incarnation of the DO-19. This had resulted in the FW-190 being built around the 18-cylinder BMW 802, the double bank version of the BMW 132 engine.

When Lenz had found out that he was being transferred to a fighter wing he looked at it with mixed emotions. He’d come into his own piloting the Stukas and whenever he’d met units of the Heer in rear areas they’d been overjoyed to tell him all about the times that the ground attack aircraft had had their backs. Flying fighter planes didn’t have that connection or instant gratification. He also missed the presence of having the gunner in the back seat. Apparently, his record of being cool under pressure had been noticed because he’d been transferred to JG-1.

The airplane was among the first production from Focke-Wulf, FW-190A1, the nose and tail of this one had already been painted chrome yellow marking it as Jasta 10. While Lenz was used to having the big Jumo V-12 in front of him the 18 cylinder BMW 802 was a very different experience. He flipped the switch for the magnetos starting the engine. The airplane was engulfed by a cloud of blue smoke as the remaining oil in the cylinders burnt off, this was blown away by the large prop as it spun up to speed. His father had told him stories about having to hand prop airplanes in the Great War. He was glad that was no longer the standard practice, good way to lose a hand.

Lenz taxied out to the runway and stopped at the threshold. One other change from Spain, there he could have just swung onto the runway and taken off. Here he had to wait for permission from the tower. Eventually the tower got around to acknowledging his presence, it wasn’t that long only a moment but it was enough time to annoy Lenz. He swung the plane onto the runway and applied full power. That was one of the key differences between the FW and the Stuka. Where the Stuka clawed its way into the air under its own weight and that of the bombload the FW leaped into the air driven by 1900 horsepower pulling a fraction of the weight. He smiled under the oxygen mask as the landscape fell away.


Berlin

Maria was bored out of her mind. She had been working the metro desk for the last couple of months but it was still better than having her stories junked in Features. She was seated at her typewriter trying to clear her head when she started writing about her experiences in Spain to get back into the rhythm.

A few hours later she was staring at a stack of thirty pages. If the Editor discovered that she had done this on company time he would be furious with her but she had something here. It was clear that she still hadn’t completely gotten Spain out of her system. If she couldn’t write about the tempest that was on the horizon, then there should be nothing to stop her from writing about the one that just passed by. From her perspective, the destruction in Spain was merely a prelude to what to come. If anyone ever read this than they could easily read between the lines if they had even the slightest amount of intelligence. If anything, those who were still chest pounding over Spain would see the documentation of their campaign as something of a triumph rather than a stark warning.

Before the day was over she had written twenty more pages.


Wunsdorf-Zossen

Emil was seated across from General Strauss, the Heer General disliked him as an insubordinate jumped up noncom who had for decades failed to take a hint as to the proper order of things. Now the Division that General Strauss commanded had been assigned to the Fallschirmjäger under the command of Wolfram von Richthofen. General Student had never been found and it was only a question as to timing as to when his death was to be made official.

The other thing that was about to be officially announced was the demobilization of 1st Fallschirmjäger Division. It was going to be parceled out to create the cores of several new Divisions. Emil had been told that he should be honored, that this was because of his success. Still he was watching as men who he had trained and commanded, some of them since before Poland were being scattered. He didn’t like what he was seeing and here in this airless room they were determining who would go where.
 
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Hmm... Interesting. I see stress being built in Emil and Maria. Due to the words of Murphy, they will probably hit the same bar for a drink. The next thing... well, CHAOS!!!

On the other hand, it is a very nice development. I wonder if Emil can group his men fairly closed (say Divisions in the same or closed regions). Or, if he has enough luck (like in Verdun), make a few new Paratrooper Divisions (because, let's face it, he's badass enough to lead a few Para Divisions, even if he only leads one on paper)
 
Digging around about Student I found Major Mors, who, afaik was the brains behind Operation Oak. Skozenys brawn (and inflated repuation) nonwithstanding. Will he show up as Richthofens (and Emils) slightly overworked ops planner ("Remember to bring strong coffee and a cask for Harald." "Another?" "It's maneuver time and someone has to balance the bravery with brains.") or get a command of his own?
 
I will hope that Maria's story and/or book will be a success and give her extra money and recognition. It might help make up a little for getting her other story squashed.

Emil having to deal with a new commander and riding several skilled and experienced men. Will get a division of his own or stay as a deputy/staff officer?
 
"If she couldn’t write about the tempest that was on the horizon, then there should be nothing to stop her from writing about the one that just passed by. From her perspective, the destruction in Spain was merely a prelude to what to come. If anyone ever read this than they could easily read between the lines if they had even the slightest amount of intelligence."

If this book gets published, I think the Abwehr will use it as an means to get the message out to the public that a storm is coming..
 
"If she couldn’t write about the tempest that was on the horizon, then there should be nothing to stop her from writing about the one that just passed by. From her perspective, the destruction in Spain was merely a prelude to what to come. If anyone ever read this than they could easily read between the lines if they had even the slightest amount of intelligence."

If this book gets published, I think the Abwehr will use it as an means to get the message out to the public that a storm is coming..

There could be some post editorial collusion if Abwer wishes to add some between the lines.
 
Maria's figured out a good solution that protects the country.

Also, FW-190s more than a year early spell bad news for the foes of the Empire. I'd love to see if Germany buys B-17s or builds a Mosquito analogue (Germany and Eastern Europe have the world's best piano and furniture builders and there's tons of forests in Central Europe).
 
Maria's figured out a good solution that protects the country.

Also, FW-190s more than a year early spell bad news for the foes of the Empire. I'd love to see if Germany buys B-17s or builds a Mosquito analogue (Germany and Eastern Europe have the world's best piano and furniture builders and there's tons of forests in Central Europe).
Why settle for a Mosquito when they could build something like the Spruce Goose?
76e02595c12b454d5423162a189d24f6.jpg

A little megalomania is good for the soul.
imgres
 
I like the aeroplane updates and its not at all unlikely to be a number of years ahead with uninterrupted development.
Being a declared fan in the He100 I have to say it might still go into production. Its a much better High altitude, long-range, loiter time and eventually High speed candidate than FW190 (although the FW190 is a very sound first choice with their anticipated enemy in mind). It didn't take heinkel long to install the retractable radiators when ordered to do it. The FW190 being chosen could have the same effect.
 
Why settle for a Mosquito when they could build something like the Spruce Goose?
76e02595c12b454d5423162a189d24f6.jpg

A little megalomania is good for the soul.
imgres

Except that the Mossie is both one of the most elegant and most versatile bombers ever made, while the Goose was a fool's errand.

The other thing is that the Mossie exploits an indigenous industry and doesn't use vital War metals.
 
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How are a few of these coming along?
1. Radar, specifically airborne intercept.
2. Naval raiders like manned torpedoes, midget subs and frogmen.
3. Naval aviation.
4. Helicopters.
5. Rocket artillery.
 
Except that the Mossie is both one of the most elegant and most versatile bombers ever made, while the Goose was a fool's errand.

The other thing is that the Mossie exploits an indigenous industry and doesn't use vital War metals.
But the Mosquito is much smaller. How can you show your (military) potence if you build something that isn't impractically large? I mean, USSR already had this:
17b191a728c129b072324e0595c257cd.jpg

(even if it only flew twice).

A little more seriously, the Germans built the Me 323, shown below, in '42 and it was an actual functional long range heavy transport plane.
20161003221029.jpg
 
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