Part 37, Chapter 451
Chapter Four Hundred Fifty-One


24th February 1945

Jena

Emil had driven down from Berlin that afternoon with Maria and Zella to visit his parents. It was a chance to see them before they left for the Far East and Emil didn’t know when they would be back again. Heinz Guderian had suffered what was being called a minor heart attack, Peter had said that there was no such thing, and it was enough to get him sidelined ahead of the Manchurian Campaign. His replacement Günther von Kluge had requested Emil as Inspector General of Infantry. Emil’s understanding was that he would be reporting directly to Augustus Lang and be keeping an eye on things for the Government. It wasn’t lost on Emil that he would occupying the same position that Manfred von Wolvogle had before he’d been appointed Commander in Chief of the Russian Theater During the Soviet War. Maria had decided that she would come to Vladivostok and wasn’t going to argue about it. She hadn’t liked it when Emil had left her behind in Australia and that wasn’t going to happen this time.

There was another reason why Emil had come as well. According to Peter, their father, Hugo Holz was resisting the idea of retirement. Peter had said that he'd known for some time that a lifetime of hard work had taken its toll on their father. He'd had a bad back for a long time but it was the arthritis in his hands that was effectively ending his career after nearly fifty years. The University and Government were trying to ease him out, he was having none of it.

It was not like Emil could blame his father. Aside from a brief stint in the Heer, he’d been working as a Book Binder since he’d started as an apprentice shortly after his fifteenth birthday. He’d eventually become a respected Master in his trade and the books he’d worked on were frequently works of art. His identity was totally wrapped up in his profession.

“It’s just the cold getting to my hands” Hugo said, “It will get better as things warm up this Spring.”

“That’s not how it works, Pops” Emil said, “I talked to Peter and he said that it’s a degenerative condition.”

“What does he know?”

“Peter happens to be a surgeon with two decades of experience” Emil replied, “I wouldn’t argue with him on matters like these.”

Pops just stared at Emil in hopes that he’d eventually just leave the basement workshop. He could actually see that there had been a visible decline in his father’s output from years prior and that there were a number of incomplete projects gathering dust. Something that would have once been unthinkable.

“Mom said that dinner is going to be ready soon” Emil said.

“Yeah, I’ll be up” Pops said, it was clear that he wasn’t going to listen to Emil either.


Formosa

Eun-Yeong Moon was an odd figure and not what Tilo would have expected a resistance leader to look like. She was a little old lady whose only real interest seemed to be her flower garden. When Tilo had been briefed about her he’d been told that she had fled Korea one step ahead of the secret police and had been hiding on Formosa for the last few years. When the island had been liberated she had emerged of her own accord. Tilo had a hard time reconciling that with the fact that all she seemed to want from him was someone to quite literally shovel manure.

Currently Tilo was wearing the same tattered clothes that he’d worn in Vietnam. It had been an unpleasant surprise the first day that he’d met Moon and learned what she expected from him. Fortunately for him, it was winter on the northern part of the island as he worked to turn over one of the flowerbeds. He wasn’t afraid of doing a bit of work, just not under a tropical sun. Presently, Moon came out and was watching him work.

“You are a very different man than your father” Moon said, “He would have gotten someone else to that.”

“How would you know that?” Tilo asked.

“From when he and his men were in China twenty years ago” Moon said.

Tilo paused from his work. When could have his father have possibly been in China?

“You must be mistaken” Tilo replied.

“Your father is Johann Schultz, yes” Moon said, “I remember him from Tsingtao, he had this boy with him, a Thorwald if I recall, everyone said he was a true killer. He also had a pair of bruisers with him, I don’t remember their names. And they were working with that crazed Frenchman, César something or the other.”

“César Sauvageot?” Tilo asked, thoroughly bewildered.

“I think that’s what the Frenchman’s name was” Moon said, “So, yes, that was your father?”

“I guess so” Tilo answered uncertainly.

“Good then” Moon said before turning and going back towards the house.

Tilo’s mind was full of turmoil. He’d had his suspicions about what his father had been doing during his long career but he had never heard anything that direct before. Heinz Thorwald was the legendary founder of Special Warfare School in Judenbach, which was where the SKA and MA had come from. And César Sauvageot was the monster under the bed. What could his father have possibly been doing in China with those people?


Berlin

Doctor Albert Brandt was an odd figure, in his youth he’d traveled extensively to the Far East and the Americas. It was said that some of the things that he’d learned in China and India were the source of many of the theories that he was still exploring. There were also rumors that he had frequently used himself as a test subject in his own Pharmacological research in a recreational manner.

Peter had no idea how Brandt had learned of it but he’d known that Peter had reviewed some of the studies that he’d conducted in recent years in the treatment of what was formally known as Combat Stress but was apparently headed towards the more general name Persistent Traumatic Stress. He’d been seeking Peter out in what Peter figured was an attempt to put a veneer of respectability on his studies. Conversely, Peter had been avoiding him for the very same reason.

Peter saw him shuffling towards the table where he was eating a late dinner, grey hair disheveled and wearing an oft patched tweed suit under a stained white lab coat. “Do you mind if I sit here, Doctor Holz?” Brandt asked. Peter glanced around the room, the Faculty Cafeteria was mostly empty this time of night but with it being mostly used by Doctors and other hospital staff it needed to be open all hours.

“Do whatever you like” Peter said with a neutral voice.

“Thank you” Brandt said sitting down, “I understand that you recently reviewed some of my papers. What did you think?”

“I think that your methods are sloppy and your research is nearly impossible to replicate” Peter said.

“That’s because people are messy and every person I deal with is a unique individual” Brandt said.

“Perhaps” Peter said, noncommittedly, “But there is a reason why the scientific method exists.”

“I can understand that” Brandt replied, “But why were you reviewing my papers in the first place?”

“Because when current methods don’t appear to be effective then perhaps it’s time to look further afield” Peter said, “Sometimes even way out into the weeds.”

“I don’t know if I should thank you or feel insulted” Brandt said.

“Do whatever you like” Peter said in the same neutral voice he had used before.
 
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Did it have any positive affects because I just from an uninformed position about managing PSTD would think it just increase there problems with an addiction.
 
Did it have any positive affects because I just from an uninformed position about managing PSTD would think it just increase there problems with an addiction.

Laudanum (And any opioid for that matter) is incredibly addictive, so as a treatment I can't see it being useful whatsoever. Marijuana I don't know if that would help or not.
 
Chapter Four Hundred Fifty

22nd February 1945

North PacificWhat the Fleet needed was a turbine jet aircraft of their own but that was still apparently some time off. They were still trying to figure out if it was possible to operate such aircraft from Carriers. And if it was then how they would go about doing that.

Somebody's gonna think of angled landing-on decks.
I think it might be lysergic.
Berlin

“Katherine knows she has a problem” Peter said, “In some ways that creates a problem for us. I fear that she might agree to take part in some of the more unorthodox experiments that are being proposed.”

“She’s a brave girl” Tangeman replied, “It’s in her nature to take things on directly.”

“There are those in this very institution who would take advantage of her because of that” Peter said, “Doctor Brandt for instance.”

“His results are promising.”

“Yes, but his tools of choice tend to be lysergic acid and methylenedioxy” Peter said, “Is that really to sort of thing that that should ever be considered regarding someone with SKA training?”

Yes. Doctor Brandt might be TTL's Timothy Leary. By the way, methylenedioxy "is an entactogen, psychedelic, and stimulant of the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical classes. It is the N-hydroxy homologue of MDMA ("Ecstasy"), and the N-methyl homologue of MDOH"

“Fraulein Plank’s arrhythmia is back” Tangeman said.

“You think she’s been starving herself again?” Peter asked, “That’s what caused it the last time isn’t it?”

“Yes” Tangeman replied, “And you can’t exactly take her word about anything, we will need to check her teeth for acid erosion.”

That put Peter’s own teeth on edge, bulimia nervosa. Since he’d come to this University he had been introduced to the reality that these students tended to have intractable problems the likes of which he’d only ever encountered in the worst wards of military hospitals. How was that even possible?

I keep mentioning Propranolol Its on-label usage is for heart problems and a major off-label use is for anxiety. I've read that it can lessen the impact of remembered traumatic events.

Edit: changed metoprolol to propanolol
 
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I keep mentioning metoprolol. Its on-label usage is for heart problems and a major off-label use is for anxiety. I've read that it can lessen the impact of remembered traumatic events.

Propranolol at least is being investigated for use in acute treatment of PTSD (and is often used for anxiety, especially with physical symptoms), so metoprolol should work the same way, preventing strong physical reactions to traumatic memories.
 
Propranolol at least is being investigated for use in acute treatment of PTSD (and is often used for anxiety, especially with physical symptoms), so metoprolol should work the same way, preventing strong physical reactions to traumatic memories.

Ooh, Propanolol was the one I was thinking of.
 
Laudanum (And any opioid for that matter) is incredibly addictive, so as a treatment I can't see it being useful whatsoever. Marijuana I don't know if that would help or not.

I think there has been a few studies for the use of Marijuana in USA towards helping with flashbacks I think.
 
Part 37, Chapter 452
Chapter Four Hundred Fifty-Two


26th March 1945

Berlin

Peter should have realized that Kat would try to work around him, especially considering just how desperate she was. What she hadn’t known was that he was the one to approve the participants latest study and he’d recognized her case history even though her name wasn’t used.

“I know that this woman has been your patient for years, Doctor Holz” Doctor Tangeman said, “Are you sure that that you’re being completely objective?”

“But I’d asked her to ask my opinion before she agreed to anything” Peter said.

“She’s not” Tangeman replied, “At least not yet.”

“And is she aware how dangerous this is? One of the possibilities that we’ve had to consider that subjects could potentially have a psychotic break.”

“It seems to me that she’s perfectly willing to take risks and there is a real possibility that she’s headed towards a breakdown at some point baring intervention anyway” Tangeman said, “If you care that much then toss her file and call it good. But there is one thing you might not have considered.”

“What’s that?” Peter asked.

“If she’s as smart as you say she is then she saw the identification number of the department that is conducting the study” Tangeman pointed out, “She would have known that it would be either of us who would be reviewing her application to join this study.”

Doctor Tangeman might have a point, what if by trying to protect Kat he was actually selling her short. He had spent weeks studying Brandt’s research and had found some intriguing possibilities if they were used to complement existing methods but it was a matter of proving efficacy. Because they were attempting to build on the research already conducted by Brandt things had come together a lot faster than Peter had expected. When Peter had put out notices that he was looking to conduct a study involving PTS he had expected that he would encounter the sort of things that he had in the past. Namely an unwillingness to admit that the problem even existed and that was doubly true with the sort individuals he normally worked with, former military who had to have their entire lives fall apart completely before they reached that point. Instead he had dozens of applications, most of whom could provide documentation that they actually might be helped by the study.

Tangeman had her own theories as to why that had happened. Most of the veterans who were already at the University were the ones who had been through the worst that the Eastern Front could dish out. Most of them were already perfectly aware of their status as walking wounded. What would their involvement in the study damage that wasn’t already flaming wreckage? Besides that, it might be interesting.


North Pacific

Tilo had been unexpectedly woken up and shoved on to an airplane. In turn he’d then had the bone rattling experience of having that same airplane land on an Aircraft Carrier followed by getting shoved roughly onto a helicopter. Of all the Aircraft Carriers he could have landed on it had to be the Voss where the crew remembered his outfit and what they had done on the night before the Battle of Saipan had begun. They hadn’t beat the crap out of him but they done everything shy of that. Then the helicopter had landed on what had turned out to be the Fleet’s Flagship, the SMS Preussen and he had yet another jarring experience. Having to explain what he’d been doing for the last several weeks to Admiral von Schmidt, who Reier once described as only slightly below God as far as the likes of him was concerned.

“I’m perfectly aware of that, Sir” Tilo said, “But that was how she introduced herself to me.”

The very first question out of the Admiral’s mouth had been about how in Tilo’s report he’d mentioned Eun-Yeong Moon and how the name was the wrong way around.

“She also said she’d seen my father in Tsingtao twenty years ago” Tilo said. That hadn’t been in the written report.

“That doesn’t surprise me” Admiral von Schmidt said, “Your father passed through there a few times a couple of decades ago and it was a hotbed of various revolutionary movements at the time.”

“She told me as much” Tilo said.

“Anything else?”

“Frau Moon said that my father left China in the company of César Sauvageot, Sir” Tilo said, “I didn’t include that in the report.”

“For obvious reasons” Admiral von Schmidt said, “Would it surprise you to learn that I ordered him to do it.”

“What, why?” Tilo asked.

“Because Sauvageot had been exiled to China at my direction and I’d come to feel sorry for him” Admiral von Schmidt replied, “Not even I could foresee the tragic consequences of what I had considered an act of mercy.”

Tilo just stared at Admiral von Schmidt who was sitting there with an enigmatic look on his face.

“I also enjoyed proving that I was smarter than everyone else” The Admiral said, “A rather harsh rebuke of a certain philosopher who I know you once wrote a paper on.”

“How do you know about that, Sir?” Tilo asked. He didn’t care to think about the person who he’d once been. That was several years and thousands of kilometers away. He’d learned a lot about how the world really worked since then.

“Your father told me about it five years ago” Admiral von Schmidt said.

“I don’t think that way anymore” Tilo replied, “And I’ve been left with more questions than answers about my father.”

“I figured as much when the Koreans couldn’t find fault with you when they were deciding if you were someone they could work with.” The Admiral said, “And as for your father, if you ever get back home you should ask him. What he’ll be able to tell you is an extraordinary story or two.”
 
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And Tilo may JUST be getting the bloody clue that landing on weirder shit and getting out wiser and somehow smelling to roses runs in the family.
 
Chapter Four Hundred Fifty

22nd February 1945

North Pacific

The Pacific Fleet Headquarters had recently been moved from Freemantle to Taipei but they were still using the same operator to send highly encrypted messages to the ships at sea. Jacob had known him since he’d been the radio operator of a different ship while Jacob had been aboard the SMS Moltke. That was thirty years earlier and he still managed to misspell the same words even though they were used fairly often. It was an amusing joke for Jacob but few would even notice when it happened.

Today’s messages were regarding the current operation and the continuing coordination with the Luftwaffe. A week earlier the bombing of the Japanese islands had commenced by heavy bombers based out of airfields near Vladivostok.

Evidently the Luftwaffe was able to avoid the Jet Stream that bedeviled the XXI Bomber Command's B-29s IOTL, and which led to the firebombing of Japan's cities.

Does Germany have any air-droppable mines for Japanese ports on the Sea of Japan?
 
Japan is getting most of its protein from the fishing fleet in the Sea of Japan and disrupting that with dropping mines will probably be the best way of reducing food supplies to the Home Islands.

Also with Vladivostok in Germany's hand and full control of the Trans Siberian Railroad, could Germany transport submarines in sections and reassemble them in Vladivostok?
 
Japan is getting most of its protein from the fishing fleet in the Sea of Japan and disrupting that with dropping mines will probably be the best way of reducing food supplies to the Home Islands.

Also with Vladivostok in Germany's hand and full control of the Trans Siberian Railroad, could Germany transport submarines in sections and reassemble them in Vladivostok?
Sea lanes are open ITTL. They Can sail through either Suez or Panama ITTL.
 
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