Ambitious young lawyers that want to make their name as criminal defence lawyers afraid of no case.

Exactly. This is the highest-profile case ever and, as such, it'll attract lawyers like a turd attracts flies. "I was part of Stalin's defense team. If I can defend him think about how well I can defend you."
 
Exactly. This is the highest-profile case ever and, as such, it'll attract lawyers like a turd attracts flies. "I was part of Stalin's defense team. If I can defend him think about how well I can defend you."

Presuming Stalin WANTS a lawyer. Given who he was, I wouldn't be surprised if insists on being his own defence, and going off on long tirades.
 
Germany and the Allies are going to want everything to be above board, by the book, transparent, and not looking like one of Stalin's show trials.
Some of the main goals of the trials that are coming is to discredit communism as a viable political philosophy, separate the Russian people from the actions of the Soviet government, and show that following orders is not an excuse to commit atrocities.

I could see at the trial of Stalin when it comes to the part about the Tumbler Ridge Massacre, a surprise witness is called to the stand to give a first hand account of the event: Jehane Thomas-Romanova the only surviving witness and granddaughter of Czar Nicholas II.
 
Germany and the Allies are going to want everything to be above board, by the book, transparent, and not looking like one of Stalin's show trials.
Some of the main goals of the trials that are coming is to discredit communism as a viable political philosophy, separate the Russian people from the actions of the Soviet government, and show that following orders is not an excuse to commit atrocities.

I could see at the trial of Stalin when it comes to the part about the Tumbler Ridge Massacre, a surprise witness is called to the stand to give a first hand account of the event: Jehane Thomas-Romanova the only surviving witness and granddaughter of Czar Nicholas II.

INAL but the problem with Tumbler Ridge, actually with a lot of the charges, are that the links between Stalin and the actual perps are missing (Stalin -> Beria (who's dead) -> NKVD hit team (who are all dead). "Everybody knows" isn't good enough in a court of law. It'd almost be better to wait until the war's over and the Allies can get their hands on the archives.
 
More likely than not, Stalin and company are going to be tried after the war by an international tribunal either in Moscow or St. Petersburg and the prosecutors are going to have full access to the archives.
There will be mid level NKVD officials who are going to want to save their own neck by testifying about orders that ties Stalin to the various charges by confirming the memos and documents that has been found.
 
More likely than not, Stalin and company are going to be tried after the war by an international tribunal either in Moscow or St. Petersburg and the prosecutors are going to have full access to the archives.
There will be mid level NKVD officials who are going to want to save their own neck by testifying about orders that ties Stalin to the various charges by confirming the memos and documents that has been found.

"But we were only following orders..."
Let's see how that stands up this time around?
 
More likely than not, Stalin and company are going to be tried after the war by an international tribunal either in Moscow or St. Petersburg and the prosecutors are going to have full access to the archives.
There will be mid level NKVD officials who are going to want to save their own neck by testifying about orders that ties Stalin to the various charges by confirming the memos and documents that has been found.
That if Molotov also doesn't sings an entire opera like the best soprano of all the dirt of Stalin, Beria and others in the Kremlin in exchange for a lifetime sentence.
 
INAL but the problem with Tumbler Ridge, actually with a lot of the charges, are that the links between Stalin and the actual perps are missing (Stalin -> Beria (who's dead) -> NKVD hit team (who are all dead). "Everybody knows" isn't good enough in a court of law. It'd almost be better to wait until the war's over and the Allies can get their hands on the archives.
The way you tie Stalin to the massacre is by having the NKVD official from the Accounting Department who is in charge of disbursements in North America testify that he got a memo and written orders with Beria's signature on them that OPERATION LOOSE ENDS has been approved by the "Highest Authority" and that money from various NKVD bank accounts are to be sent to the bank account of a NKVD front company in Seattle for some "exterminators".
Then you would show the various bank records of the money being transferred to the bank account to the front company, from there you can show records that the front company paid money to the hit team for "expenses in exterminating vermin".
The prosecutors will have the documents in question, and the official will confirm that those are the original documents.

I read that the NKVD and later the KGB kept a tight rein on money and expenses that their field agents could use and had to get approval from Moscow to spend anything extra.
 
The way you tie Stalin to the massacre is by having the NKVD official from the Accounting Department who is in charge of disbursements in North America testify that he got a memo and written orders with Beria's signature on them that OPERATION LOOSE ENDS has been approved by the "Highest Authority" and that money from various NKVD bank accounts are to be sent to the bank account of a NKVD front company in Seattle for some "exterminators".
Then you would show the various bank records of the money being transferred to the bank account to the front company, from there you can show records that the front company paid money to the hit team for "expenses in exterminating vermin".
The prosecutors will have the documents in question, and the official will confirm that those are the original documents.

I read that the NKVD and later the KGB kept a tight rein on money and expenses that their field agents could use and had to get approval from Moscow to spend anything extra.

That would do it. Accompanied by statements by the RCMP who found "the body of a young woman later identified as the last member of the Romanov family." That the body was still barely alive would be glossed over.

On a lighter note: how many of the parachutes used in that last operation got returned for refurbishment and repacking as opposed to picked up by the areas's inhabitants, cut up for scarves and other keep-warm uses (or camo if there's still a lot of snow on the ground) by the Paras themselves or pilfered by the logistics troops shipping them back?

I think there'd be parachute bridal dress patterns circulating by samizdat.
 
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Part 33, Chapter 398
Three Hundred Ninety-Eight


18th July 1944

Stupino, Moscow Oblast, Russia

Kat was there when the helicopters came in. She saw as they unloaded Stalin and Molotov and she just didn’t feel anything. Stalin was the monster who ordered the deaths of Gianna’s family and made it so that she couldn’t even use her real name if she wanted a halfway normal life. The actions that Stalin had ordered and war he had started had irrevocably altered the course of Kat’s own life. Now he just looked like a scared old man and she couldn’t bring herself to care one way or the other. She just felt hollow.

Matthias had told Kat about how the mission had gone. He had bluffed an NKVD Colonel into getting them a lorry to use, something that she was sure going to become legendary with time. The whole Regiment was celebrating the success of the mission but Kat wasn’t interested in joining them. It was the greatest coup that they could have possibly pulled and Kat realized that she was thankful that all eyes were going to be on others for once. Instead she was in the radio room listening to what was going on. Between the havoc wrought by the various traps left by the SKA, the renewed bombing of Moscow by the Luftwaffe, Stalin and his deputy being missing and the continued press on all fronts, the whole situation was chaotic. It reminded her of a pan of hot grease, a sputtering, hissing mess complete with smoke and flames. But that was now someone else’s problem. It hadn’t sunk in for anyone else yet but their war was over and they were ending it on a high note.


Ramenskoye, Moscow Oblast, Russia

The orders were simple enough, the 5th Army had peeled off from the main advance and were driving north to the east of Moscow in an effort to encircle the city. It was a warm Summer evening but one would think that it was overcast with the amount of smoke that was in the air and ash was falling like snow. It wasn’t visible but Kurt had been told that vast columns of smoke were rising from Moscow as the Luftwaffe pulverized the place. Starting earlier that day, the Luftwaffe had thrown everything they had against the city starting the fires. There was also talk that the 42cm siege guns that had been used against Sevastopol and Stalingrad were being moved into place south of the city.

Even from the cupola of his Panzer Kurt could tell that this thing was over. But they still had the problem of the occasional crew who had a heavy that they had rounded up enough fuel to make a run at them or an anti-tank gun. He knew in his bones that if the situation had been the other way around then he would have done the exact same thing, fighting on until the bitter end. Still though. Who wanted to die for a war that was basically over?

Berlin

“There is a Pastor Sjostedt here for you, Chancellor” Lang’s secretary said over the intercom.

“Send him in please” Lang said. He had not seen Piers Sjostedt in some time, of course with the concerns of the war Lang frequently hadn’t seen anything outside of his office in quite some time. It wasn’t helped the fact that Sjostedt seldom left Flensburg which was odd for a man who had come to have an international reach.

Lang’s understanding that while Sjostedt was morally opposed to war in general he had spent the current one arranging aid for soldiers in the field. He had also arranged for that to come from around the world in a loose non-denominational organization of churches and benevolent societies. Ironically it was said that the actions of Sjostedt had the effect of having an extra Army Corps in the field. With his past as a revolutionary leader and soldier, Sjostedt was one of the few people that everyone felt that they could trust without reservation. It was useful in what Lang was going ask him to do.

Alexander Kerensky, Irakli Tsereteli and Viktor Chernov had turned up in Berlin. As had Anton Denikin and Grigory Semyonov in the company of Vladimir Kirillovich. Any second now those two groups of men would realize that they were all in the same city at the same time. Then Lang would have a serious problem on his hands. There was blood in the water and the sharks were circling. Earlier that day he had been notified that a team from the SKA had captured Joseph Stalin and his deputy Vyacheslav Molotov in a daring raid led by a Hauptman Emrich Lichtenfeld. When word got out about that then the feeding frenzy would really begin.

Lang needed Sjostedt to act as a moderator in what was really an unwinnable situation in hopes that it would buy them enough time to get something in place before Russia tore itself apart. Even here in Germany the unity that had existed while the war raged in Silesia and Poland was evaporating before his eyes. With the political parties of the far left and right discredited by events that had occurred during the war the minor party candidates were fleeing in to the major parties effectively driving them further apart ideologically. The Social Democrats and National Liberals had always had some overlap which enabled government to function. Now Lang had no idea what was going to happen. The Government was all too likely to end up jammed up in minor squabbles after the next election and it couldn’t happen at a worse time.
 
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Lang's government is certain to be returned with a majority. They won the war, and not only that, have captured and tried, (or about to try), Beria, Molotov and Stalin.

The real question though, is do they want to win?
Winning means returning Germany's economy to a peace time footing, and working out what to do with the sudden rush of women into the work place. Too many people, too few jobs.
Winning means reintegrating the members of the armed forces back into civilian life.
Winning means paying the bills and settling the debts they've run up, and finding the funds to do so.
Winning means sorting out the mess that is Russia, and later Japan, with the bill that comes with it.

Winning the war is the easy bit, winning the peace takes a better mind than mine.
 
If the US still has an ambassador and embassy in Moscow, this may be the time for the remaining leadership of the Soviet Union to start making overtures for peace talks.

I noticed that unlike OTL WWII there has been no demands for "Unconditional Surrender" ITTL.
 
If the US still has an ambassador and embassy in Moscow, this may be the time for the remaining leadership of the Soviet Union to start making overtures for peace talks.

I noticed that unlike OTL WWII there has been no demands for "Unconditional Surrender" ITTL.

What's the likelyhood of the upper levels of the Soviet leadership degenerating into a power struggle?
 
Incredibly high

Perhaps the better question is, after years of purges, is there going to be anyone with the ambition to step into those shoes? Seize power AND keep a civil war from breaking out? With Molotov and Beria out of the way, I can't think of another person who might try.
 
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