What happened to Stoltz? I have been reading this for a while and it doesn't say what did happen to him. Did I miss something?
 
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What happened to Stoltz? I have been reading this for a while and it doesn't say what did happen to him. Did I miss something?
He's probably keeps going even madder in incarceration. He was kept in a cell next to Cesar Sauvegeot. Well, unless they shot him eventually. Treason and such. In fact, I think that would have been the lawful sentence in the time period, as opposed to life in solitary confinement as a 'secret' detainee, which is, presumably, more akin to a revenge move than an actual sentence by a German Military Tribunal.
 
He's probably keeps going even madder in incarceration. He was kept in a cell next to Cesar Sauvegeot. Well, unless they shot him eventually. Treason and such. In fact, I think that would have been the lawful sentence in the time period, as opposed to life in solitary confinement as a 'secret' detainee, which is, presumably, more akin to a revenge move than an actual sentence by a German Military Tribunal.

Well, there was probably too many volunteers to be on the firing squad, and they didn't want to play favorites...
 
The Launch would have been of 'Long Lance' torpedoes capable of being launched 40km from their target. OK, so it's a complete shot in the dark as the torpedoes are unguided. But if you launch dozens of them at a fleet sailing in formation who are unaware of the danger or the fact that an attack was under way has the ability to cause great damage and loss.
 
Bet it's IJN Type 93 Long-Lance torpedoes At 30km they're outside of "effective" firing range but within maximum range. With a "handful" of cruisers with usually two quad launchers each, it's a tossup as to the amount of damage they might cause.
At 30km (hell even if they are in effective range) the chances to hit even a fleet with more than 2-3 torpedoes is pretty small, considering that submarines generally fired from much closer range and still didn't always hit the target, even if it didn't maneuver.
 
In OTL the Japanese torpedo cruisers of the Kuma class carried up to ten quad torpedo tubes each! so that means forty long lances from each cruiser.
So imagine if you will all five vessels of this class firing a full salvo from all their tubes. That is two hundred torpedoes closing on the German fleet at over thirty knots.
Unless the German fleet are very savvy even if they turn away in time some hits are possible and even one long lance has the potential to do serous damge and possibly cripple even the largest Battle ships present.
 
What happened to Stoltz? I have been reading this for a while and it doesn't say what did happen to him. Did I miss something?
He was last mentioned when Sauvageot escaped to blow up the Reichstag, he was incarcerated in the cell next to him. Johan Schultz said something to the effect of "How is he still alive? The Heer will be pissed if they find out."
 
If they're listening to Radio traffic or can track radar signals, pointing at the densest part isn't a bad strategy.

Pointing at where the densest part will be when the torpedos arrive. The IJN transmitted something and then turned away. It's not really too much of a stretch to conclude that something bad is on its way and change either course or speed or both just as a precaution.

Edit: just looked as the speed of the Long Lance. Launched at 30 km, speed 96 km/hr = 30 minutes until arrival. Not enough time to get the fleet out of the danger area. Dammit.
 
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Part 29, Chapter 333
Chapter Three Hundred Thirty-Three


11th August 1943

South China Sea

It was later estimated that there were over two hundred of the Type 93 torpedoes and Intelligence had no idea that such a system existed. Divers would later salvage a dud and it would confirm Jacobs theory that it was a shot in the dark, the Japanese had launched at the outer limits of the effective range using darkness and weather to cover their retreat. It was exactly what he might have done. Overall it made for a very expensive night for the Pacific Fleet.

The Fleet had begun evasive maneuvers when one of the destroyers had her bow blown off and confusion reigned. None of the battleships were hit but the destroyers and cruisers were hard hit. The hardest hit was the SMS Pelikan, through bad luck she took two in the side, the carrier conversion had proven to be just as much a death trap as Jacob had feared. Only a couple dozen men made it off her before she capsized and sank. It would fuel his renewed effort to have the SMS Albatros and SMS Fischadler withdrawn to the Baltic for use as training ships. Most painful for Jacob was the loss of the SMS von Hipper, the heavy cruiser was his former command.

Jacob watched as the report of the nights losses was compiled. He would later remark that it was one of the worst moments of his long career. The only good thing about that day was that word reached the Fleet that the British had finally gotten their problems sorted with their ships and were joining the Fleet.


Luhansk, Ukraine

“I have to say you’ve really stepped in it this time, Rittmeister” Field Marshal von Wolvogle said as he leaned on the fender of Kurt’s Panther while Kurt sat atop the front glacis, “The Heer is looking for heroes as an answer to what that pilot did last month and the Navy with their genius Admiral.”

“That’s a stupid reason to do anything, Sir” Kurt said.

“How long have you been in the Heer?” Wolvogle said, “You know damn well that if we waited around for someone to make smart decisions nothing would get done. Was taking on four KV-14s by your lonesome a smart call?”

“When you phrase it that way it sounds like suicide” Kurt said.

Wolvogle just shrugged “I’d call it a proper cavalry action but that’s apples and oranges” He said, “You made sure that your crew was rewarded for that?”

“That was the first thing I did” Kurt replied.

“Good” Wolvogle said “You might not know this but I’ve had dealings with your biggest rival. That man can hardly turn his back on his own crew, you need to avoid that if you can.”

“Real piece of work?” Kurt asked.

“Self-aggrandizing asshole” Wolvogle said, Kurt wisely didn’t mention that Wolvogle’s legion of detractors said exactly the same thing about him, “He’s also up for decoration but I want you in Berlin to get it first.”

“And while I’m doing that what will my Company be doing?”

“I’ll have them guarding my headquarters” Wolvogle said, “They’ll have fun and I’d say they’ve earned it.”

“With all due respect, Sir” Kurt said, “That could be more dangerous for them than contact with the enemy.”

Wolvogle just smiled, he knew how to show the enlisted men a good time. Kurt suspected that on the day that death finally came for the old General, Wolvogle would have that same grin on his face.


Reichlin-Lars Airfield

In the end, the Luftwaffe found a simple way to keep Joachim from upsetting the applecart as far as the disinformation campaign was concerned. They made sure that he was too busy to speak to speak to anyone. As the pilot with the most experience in jet aircraft he was assigned to help JG-1 make the transition. That also meant that he was back to being Lenz Schultz’s wingman. Lenz had been transferred back from the Pacific/South-East Asian Theater and his successful efforts whipping Jasta 60 into shape were being rewarded by being posted Executive Officer of JG-1.

The truth was that Joachim didn’t mind in the least. Things were always a lot more fun when Lenz was around. Mock dogfights against the British or just taking a night out on the town.


Luhansk, Ukraine

After Wolvogle left Kurt Knispel with his Panzers he walked back to his staff car. He had a few problems to deal with. The vicious game of musical chairs was starting up in the Staff ranks. As the planned Winter offensive in the North moved closer to its start date he found himself having to delegate responsibility in the South. Heinz Guderian was his choice to command the newly named Army Group South, that meant that Erwin Rommel would now be commanding the 2nd Army Corps. Wolvogle had made his recommendations but frequently things took a strange turn in Wunsdorf. Wolvogle himself would have to go north to ride herd on Walter Model. The General’s abrasive personality might have held him in good stead during the siege of Leningrad but for the offensive that might not work as well. Particularly with the British and French involved.

Then there was what to do about Stalingrad. It was obvious to Wolvogle that Stalin himself would commit a large portion of the Russian Army to defending that city, his ego would demand no less. Wolvogle could care less about that city. Wolvogle had to think of a way that he could use that to his advantage before he headed north. If that substantial portion of the Russian Army could be tied down in the south…
 
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