Southern Victory - What would the citizens be called?

What would citizens of USA and CSA be known as following a Southern Victory

  • Citizens of both USA and CSA would be known as Americans

    Votes: 25 30.9%
  • Only citizens of USA would be known as Americans

    Votes: 18 22.2%
  • Only citizens of CSA would be known as Americans

    Votes: 2 2.5%
  • Citizens of USA would be known as Yankees

    Votes: 28 34.6%
  • Citizens of CSA would be known as Confederates

    Votes: 56 69.1%
  • Citizens of USA would be known as something else (what?)

    Votes: 6 7.4%
  • Citizens of CSA would be known as something else (what?)

    Votes: 12 14.8%

  • Total voters
    81
What if the Confederate States successfully broke off during the American Civil War? Would the citizens of the rump Union still be known as 'Americans'? Would the citizens of the CSA be known as 'Americans'? Is it likely that citizens of both USA and CSA would be known as Americans? Or would alternate terms become more prominent? Perhaps Confederates for southerners and Yankees for northerners? Would there exist new exonym and endonyms for the names of northerners and southerners? How would the wider world refer to the inhabitants of rump USA and CSA?
 
For the CSA, anything but "Southrons" :p
Unless you're referring to Tolkein's Haradrim, there's just something about "Southron" that I find... etymologically distressing :p
 
Like I said, probably Federals and Confederates or Americans and Confederates.
Americans would be a tough term because in the 20th century, northerners often identified themselves as Irish-American, German-American, Polish-American, etc. Southerners have a greater tendency to omit European national linkage and just use the word "American."
 
What would non-native English speakers such as French, Mexicans, Poles, Turks, Italians, Swedes, Finns, Japanese, Indians, Brazilians, Arabs, Koreans, Chinese, Hungarians etc call them?
I can answer only regarding Italian: "Confederati" for the Southerners would likely become the norm. IOTL we refer to Nothern forces as "unionisti", but that is likely to fade away, and "Federati" has a strange ring to it (and it recalls the foederati of Romand times). If the Union keeps the name "United States of America" I would say that "Statunitensi" would become the norm (the term is OTL).
 
Southerners will probably be known as Confederates or, and far more likely, by their state demonym (so Georgian, Virginian, Texan, etc). Northerners... either United Statesian or Yankee. Depending on when the CSA wins its independence, you might see American citizens be called Columbians (with OTL Colombia retaining the name New Granada).
 

dcharleos

Donor
Southerners will probably be known as Confederates or, and far more likely, by their state demonym (so Georgian, Virginian, Texan, etc). Northerners... either United Statesian or Yankee. Depending on when the CSA wins its independence, you might see American citizens be called Columbians (with OTL Colombia retaining the name New Granada).

United Statesian?

Lol. Nah. No one calls Mexicans "Estadounidenses" because they come from Los Estados Unidos de Mexico.
 
United Statesian?

Lol. Nah. No one calls Mexicans "Estadounidenses" because they come from Los Estados Unidos de Mexico.
Well, "Estadounidense" is used in Brasil to refer to someone from the US, and the Italian "Statunitense" I mentioned in some posts earlier is a thing. So in a TL where the Confederates won, it makes sense at least for third-country citizens to use this term as opposed to Confederate.
 
Well, "Estadounidense" is used in Brasil to refer to someone from the US, and the Italian "Statunitense" I mentioned in some posts earlier is a thing. So in a TL where the Confederates won, it makes sense at least for third-country citizens to use this term as opposed to Confederate.
i knew my high school Spanish teacher was on the right track! :D (i'm also of the opinion that, if any distinction needs to be made between "American" as in "of the United States" and "American" as in "of the Americas/American supercontinent", then "United Statean" is the best one to immediately avoid any confusion--it's much broader than "Yankee")
 
i knew my high school Spanish teacher was on the right track! :D (i'm also of the opinion that, if any distinction needs to be made between "American" as in "of the United States" and "American" as in "of the Americas/American supercontinent", then "United Statean" is the best one to immediately avoid any confusion--it's much broader than "Yankee")
I do agree with you. As a side note, if you surf a little the internet and look into Brazilian pages, you do find a lot of "United Statean posts". I guess there might be a similar trend in other Latin American countries...
 

dcharleos

Donor
Well, "Estadounidense" is used in Brasil to refer to someone from the US, and the Italian "Statunitense" I mentioned in some posts earlier is a thing. So in a TL where the Confederates won, it makes sense at least for third-country citizens to use this term as opposed to Confederate.

Isn't that a pretty modern phenomenon?
 
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