SNAKEDANCE - Title

SNAKEDANCE

An Attempt at a Semi-Plausible Draka

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Chapter One
Chapter One

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Extract taken from ‘Drakia: A History, Vol. I: 1620 – 1816’ by Tove Jansson.
Jansson, T., 1955. Archona Publishing Ltd; Archona, Republic of Drakia.

In 1620 at the suggestion of an English sea captain, the English government formally annexed the Cape. A small settlement was established on the shore of False Bay auspiciously named Cape City. These colonists, under the leadership of Captain George Percival, named their new colony Drakia in honour of Sir Francis Drake who, it is claimed, was George Percival’s father.

From its earliest history, Drakia was built upon slavery. Landing alongside Percival’s party were some 120 slaves who were utilised in the construction of roads and farms for growing fruit and vegetables, draining swamps and clearing scrub. At the commencement of the civil wars, successive waves of cavaliers fleeing Cromwell’s odious rule settled in Drakia. It was here that the colony first acquired its reputation for dissidence. By 1648 the population of the colony was roughly 2,000, not including their African slaves which were probably twice as numerous.

English control of the area was tenuous, and in 1653, it was challenged by the arrival of Jan van Riebeeck of the Dutch East India Company. He led two hundred Company employees to occupy Table Bay and establish the colony of Riebeeck Town. Whilst initially intended as little more than an outpost of the Dutch Empire, Riebeeck oversaw expansion, constructing the first great agricultural estates in Drakia’s history.

Tensions over arable and pastureland increased over the next two decades as both settlements expanded. When war broke out between the British and the Dutch in 1672, the colonials seized their chance. Riebeeck Town was besieged in 1673 though an outbreak of dysentery forced the colonists to withdraw. In 1674, an English armada arrived at port in Cape City. 12,000 troops under the command of Sir Edward Spragge overran Table Bay.

At the Treaty of Westminster, which formally ended the war, the post-war settlement in the Cape allowed for the continued residence of Dutch settlers in the region and their formal integration into the society of Drakia. As part of this treaty, laws regarding the sanctity and preservation of slavery were written into all succeeding law codes of the Crown Colony of Drakia.

Percival was replaced as the Governor of Drakia in 1675, owing to his ill health, by the naturalist Nathaniel Bacon. An able administrator and popular among the colonists Bacon set forth an ambitious plan for the expansion of Drakia, ‘fifty leagues east into the valleys and under the mountains.’

Beginning in 1675, successive waves of refugees fleeing the French Wars of Religion, helped swell the population and fuel expansion to the north and east. Bacon’s generous policy of granting land to destitute refugees saw the extensive development of the Drakian interior. The principal cash crops of this era were grain and grapes, whilst cows and sheep were the primary meat exports. The huge herds of cattle raised by the settlers lead them into conflict with their African neighbours.

In the latter half of the 17th century sporadic fighting erupted between the settlers and local Khoi-Khoi Africans. The Drakians farming techniques depleted the soil quicker than the Khoi-Khoi’s nomadic lifestyle. The Africans resented the settlers’ fencing off land that had traditionally been open to grazing. Due to the Khoi-Khoi’s hit-and-run tactics each Drakian estate became an armed encampment and a culture of independent “free burgher” farmers developed.

Despite ferocious Khoi-Khoi resistance, with dozens of burgher farms sacked and burned, the Drakians were victorious by 1677. Driving a wedge between various tribes the Drakians were able to isolate and overwhelm remaining pockets of Khoi-Khoi forces. Treatment of captured enemies was exceedingly violent, with enslavement, mass rape, and generational punishment commonly meted out.

With the colony temporarily secured the burghers reigned supreme. This caste of independent armed farmers formed the upper crust of Drakian society. All of Drakia’s Archons, from Botha to Palme have been direct descendants of this group. Below them were the “free coloureds” – children of slaves and white masters who had been freed by their white parents. Whilst unable to hold public office, they could own property and slaves, and some grew to become very wealthy. By 1710, the English government relinquished direct control of the colony, issuing a charter to Sir Christopher Wray. The population of Drakia was, at this time, 9,800 citizens, 4,000 free coloureds, and roughly 12,100 slaves.
 
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By 1710, the English government relinquished control of the colony, issuing a charter to Sir Christopher Wray. The population of Drakia was, at this time, 9,800 citizens, 4,000 free coloureds
What mean with Relinquished?
Because i don't see England give up the Colony. And more because in 1710 the BEIC started to obtain power
 
What mean with Relinquished?
Because i don't see England give up the Colony. And more because in 1710 the BEIC started to obtain power
Apologies bad phrasing - I mean relinquished direct control, the government hand it over as a grant to Wray, relinquishing direct rule from London, with a warrant to develop it as a stop off outpost for ships heading to India. Will go into this further in the next chapter.
 
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Apologies bad phrasing - I mean relinquished direct control, the government hand it over as a grant to Wray, relinquishing direct rule from London, with a warrant to develop it as a stop off outpost for ships heading to India. Will go into this further in the next chapter.
Ahhh so they become like a Domain like Canada or Australia
 
Chapter Two
Chapter Two

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Extract taken from ‘Drakia: A History, Vol. I: 1620 – 1816’ by Tove Jansson.
Jansson, T., 1955. Archona Publishing Ltd; Archona, Republic of Drakia.

By the time the 18th century began Drakia had become dependant on slavery. Most of the slaves in Drakia were Asians imported from Dutch holdings such as Batavia: Indians, Indonesians, and Ceylonese. A substantial Muslim minority existed, and the religion was even cultivated to a certain degree, with several small mosques popping up on the sandy flats of the Cape.

Whilst, during its early expansion, slaves certainly outnumbered both citizens and free coloureds, they did not reproduce in large numbers. Arable slaves were worked to death and replaced when they fell. Conditions were exceptionally harsh, particularly on the coffee plantations, where maiming in the machines was common. In the cities slaves lived in better conditions and were common as household servants, artisans, and fishermen.

Escape from bondage through manumission was rare. The 18th century would see the end of the ‘free coloureds’ as a group within the colony. Deprived of political power, they would gradually see their rights eroded and their social status reduced. By 1790, it is estimated that the population of free blacks and free people of colour was in the middle hundreds. In 1818, their status as subhumans would be enshrined in law by the Purity Decrees.

With legal means of liberation closed to them many enslaved people turned to violence. Thousands of slaves escaped in the period between 1679 and 1710. Thanks to the inability of the undermanned British garrison to re-capture them a great number thrived in the Bush. Many settled among the San people leading to the formation of the Asian-San culture or ‘Bushmen’ as they are colloquially called. These Bushmen were often organised into small bands which conducted raids on large estates and plantations.

The frequency and intensity of this raids increased until the outbreak of the First Bush War in 1708. Bushmen bands burned plantations and liberated thousands of slaves. The local British garrison, over-extended and poorly supplied, were unable to effectively stem the violence. The Duke of Marlborough, during his visit to the colony at the end of the War of the Spanish Succession, remarked, ‘the soldiery were in a state of deprivation such that only the most concerted efforts of the officers ensured their men remained clothed.’

In 1710 Governor Wray issued the Not One-Man Decree, which called for the creation of a professional militia exempting ‘not one man regardless of class or creed’ from service. This decree organised the loose network of armed burgher farmers into the Royal Drakian Militia – a standing force which could effectively respond to local threats. Over the period of 1713-1718 the Militia effectively destroyed the Bushman presence west of the Great Swart Mountains.

Extract taken from ‘The Land Of Drake: Native Cultures Of Southern Africa During The First Two Hundred Years Of The Anglo-Saxon Conquest’ by Kane Tsvangirai.
Tsvangirai, K., 2005. Raptor Books Inc.; Havana, Cuba, U.S.A.

The first four decades of European colonisation in the Cape had wreaked havoc on the San people. Governor Bacon’s policies regarding Africans was far more confrontational than his predecessors. Whilst Percival had been content to barter with the locals and exploit tribal divisions to placate them Bacon longed for the destruction of the natives of the Cape. It was his opinion that the valleys bordering Drakia be cleared of their native inhabitants and made ready for colonisation. To this end the Khoi-Khoi were exterminated by the end of the 17th century and those San which had not submitted to the foe had been pushed east towards the mountains. There they joined with the communities of runaway ex-slaves and formed the Asian-San culture.

The Asian-San represent the first true fusion of an indigenous African people with Asian slaves in Drakia’s history. They abandoned the hunter-gatherer lifestyle of their San ancestors, in favour of adopting many of the pastoral agricultural techniques and weapons mongering of their new Asian kin. The tongue of these early Bushpeople was flavoured by the languages of South Asia. For instance, ‘Atti’ the Bushpeople word for falling, sinking, and underneath, is taken from the Tamil, ‘aTi.’

Bushpeople religion is similar in origin to the voodoo religion of Hispaniola. To grossly oversimplify it is a fusion of indigenous African beliefs and rituals with the Islamic religion of the Asian ex-slaves. One of the reasons Bushpeople were so fanatical in battle was the central tenet of this faith, which held that the souls of warriors return to India after their death.

Extract taken from ‘The Mind Of A Snake: A Military History of the Draka’ by Oliver North.
North, O., 1978. U.S. Naval Press; Subic Bay Military District, U.S.A.

Incident upon its establishment in 1710 Royal Drakian Militia numbered no more than 4,000 men. About 950-1,200 free coloureds served as an auxiliary unit, dubbed the Mamluks after the Egyptian slave-soldiers. These were supported by 3,000-3,400 British soldiers in the Cape City garrison. Wray had initially planned to recruit two thousand slaves to fight in the Militia, in return for manumission, however this initiative was protested by his officers and quietly shelved.

Altogether the various Bushman armies and confederations opposing them were maybe three times as numerous as their opponents. Why, then, did the Drakians triumph? In part this was thanks to superior organisation, in part to the superior weaponry utilised by the Draka, and in part, the salted earth tactics they employed.

Wray, a fanatic of classical literature, modelled his Militia on the Army of the Late Roman Republic. Infantry was divided into units named ‘sticks’ which were comprised of up to 10 individuals, usually drawn from the same community to aid with unit cohesion, and lead by a captain. These in turn were organised into cohorts of 400 each, under a chiliarch.

Bushmen groups by comparison were generally small, highly mobile, and independent. Groups of over a hundred were considered unusual. There was little communication between them and cooperation between Bushpeople leaders was stymied by rivalries over land and pillage. This inability to unite their forces made a concerted effort to repulse the Draka impossible.

Most Drakian sticks were armed with smoothbore muskets made in Great Britain. Their opposite numbers fought mostly with second-rate weapons, bows and arrows, or spears. Some Bushmen were equipped with muskets traded to them by the Europeans, though they lacked both ammunition and powder.

Drakian battle tactics typically relied on what were known as Flying Columns. Flying Columns consisted of several hundred men who would roll up the valleys their enemies occupied in lockstep ranks, clinically clearing all Bushmen from the area. Mamluks were deployed at the head of these advances, assigned high-risk and high casualty tasks, and winning many accolades from their white officers. Behind them slaves sowed the Bushmen’s fields with salt and killed their livestock.

By 1720 the Bushpeople’s new nomadic lifestyle had been rendered untenable by the Drakian enclosure of the water sources they relied on to feed their cattle, the wholesale slaughter of their livestock, and the salting of their grazing land. The surviving Bushmen withdrew over the Great Swart and scattered west into the swamps along the Great Fish River, mingling with the Bantu-speaking peoples who were in the process of migrating into the region.
 
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Chapter Three
Chapter Three

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Extract taken from the Winter 2009 Season section of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s website: ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’
TheRoyalShakespeareCompany.com. Stratford, United Kingdom, 2009

Introduction

Thomas Bowdler is among the most celebrated dramatists in Draka history. Born to a banking family in Bath, England, Bowdler settled in Draka in 1781 following extensive travels in Europe and Africa. It was during this time that he adopted the characteristic mysticism present in all his plays, wed no less than five women, and became one of the earliest converts to Esoteric Draka Paganism.

In a career which spanned from his first play in 1791 to his beheading in 1833 he wrote 86 plays, 33 books, and 401 poems. His four adaptations of Shakespeare plays for the Draka audience were written in the period 1818-1822, and saw Bowdler edit, recontextualize, and remove elements he thought unsuitable or ideologically improper. This quartet – ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’, ‘Hamlet the Draka’, ‘Bad King John’, and ‘Titus Draconicus’ – are considered the jewels in the crown of Draka theatre.

Synopsis

A messenger arrives at the encampment of Dinkane, King of Europa, with word that Makbet and Banqcwuou have defeated the combined armies of Xhosa and Zululand, lead by the traitor Thane of Rajput, MakTheodahad, who has taken a Xhosa wife. Dinkane asks for proof of their victory, and the messenger presents him with MakTheodahad’s severed head.

Makbet and Banqcwuou, returning home, are met by three witches. They greet Makbet as ‘Thane of Dun Thalia, Thane of Rajput, and King hereafter.’ The witches tell Banqcwuou he shall be, ‘less than Makbet, yet more’ and that he shall sire kings. Perplexed, the two men rape and slay the witches, then continue on to Dun Thalia.

Upon his return, Dinkane and Lady Makbet welcome Makbet home. Once they are alone Makbet tells Lady Makbet and her serf handmaiden Maudlin of the witches’ prophesy. She is sceptical, though Maudlin encourages Makbet to seize the crown. At a celebratory banquet, Dinkane proclaims Makbet the new Thane of Rajput.

Convinced of the veracity of the prophesy Makbet and Maudlin together scheme to murder Malcolm in his sleep and lay the blame on his mamluk guards. After drugging the mamluks, Makbet murders Dinkane and his son Malcolm, plants the dagger on the incapacitated mamluks and returns to bed. The next morning, Makduf, the chief of Dinkane’s mamluk bodyguards, arrives and executes the two men charged with guarding the king.

Makbet starts to grow more and more paranoid, believing that Lady Makbet and Banqcwuou might suspect his part in Dinkane’s death. At a banquet, Lady Makbet reveals she is pregnant and Banqcwuou announces that he and his son will be returning to their home that night. Makbet recruits two murderers and sends them after Banqcwuou’s party. They are joined by a masked third murderer on the road, slay Banqcwuou, but allow his son to escape in a moment of weakness.

At a banquet held for his men, Makbet dances and makes merry, however he is disturbed by the appearance of Banqcwuou’s ghost. Lady Makbet sends the revellers away and tries to console her husband. Later, Makbet receives the third murderer, who informs him of Banqcwuou’s death and his son’s escape. Makbet angrily reprimands the third murderer and asks him why he failed in his task. In response, the third murderer unmasks revealing himself to be Hastur the Unspeakable, the God of Agriculture and Soil in Esoteric Draka Paganism. Makbet demands he show him the truth of the witches’ prophecy. Hastur replies that no man born of a woman will kill Makbet, that he must beware Makduf, and that his reign will only end when the forests of Africa march on Europa. Heading this prophecy, Makbet proceeds to impale Makduf’s wife and daughter on stakes, though Makduf himself escapes.

Lady Makbet, increasingly guilt ridden over the crimes her husband has committed, kills herself and Makbet’s unborn child. Makbet is unmoved by her death, ‘she would have died hereafter’, and resolves to have a child with Maudlin. Makduf arrives in Africa and gathers an army of Xhosa and Zulus to attack Makbet. As they approach Dun Thalia, the Africans chop down trees, and use their branches as battle standards. Maudlin, upon seemingly seeing the trees approach from her balcony, throws herself from the castle, causing Makbet to despair and deliver the ‘Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow’ soliloquy.

As the Africans overrun the castle Makbet and Makduf come face to face. Makbet boasts that no man born of a woman may kill him. Makduf reveals that he was born to a Zulu isangoma, and was thus, ‘not of a weakly woman’s womb conveyed.’ After cutting off Makbet’s head Makduf declares himself King of Europa. The play ends on an, apparently, hopeful note with Banqcwuou’s son arriving in a new, tropical land which they subjugate and christen Drakia.

Analysis

On its surface, ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’ serves as a simple, racist fairy-tale. The brave soldier Makbet allows himself to be seduced by the wicked, wanton serf woman Maudlin and pays the ultimate price for miscegenation. The play is very much informed by the Draka Pagan religion, Rajput and Dun Thalia (in addition to being the names of major Draka cities) are two of the mythological heavenly kingdoms which supposedly existed in Europe thousands of years ago. The play’s ending draws on the allegorical foundation myth for the Draka people.

A revisionist approach to the play has been popular since Arthur Miller’s 1948 production at the New York Idlewild Theatre. Instead of a strong-willed and cunning warrior lead astray by a seducing serf, Makbet is instead a brutal tyrant whose overthrow by the Africans is a moment of liberation. Maudlin and Lady Makbet are, here, victims of Makbet’s lust as much as they are agents of their own fate. Maudlin’s support for Makbet can be read as her trying to direct his violence towards the nation and away from herself.

According to Miller, this is a play about the good-hearted proletarian serfs overthrowing bad-hearted masters. Indeed, the only character in this play who acts selflessly at all is Makduf the Mamluk, a serf. A faithful servant to Dinkane unto his master’s death he undertakes his invasion of Europa with the express intent of avenging his slain relatives. In this reading Banqcwuou’s son conquering Drakia is not a happy ending but rather a sad reminder of the cyclical nature of history.

Main Cast

Makbet, thane of Dun Thalia – Christopher Eccleston

Lady Makbet, Makbet’s wife – Tracey Ann Oberman

Maudlin, Makbet’s serf – Billie Piper

Banqcwuou, a general – Robert Carlyle

Dinkane, king of Europa – Jim Broadbent

Makduf, Dinkane’s mamluk – Kayvan Novak

Extract taken from ‘Cyclopaedia Britannica’ by Richard P. Stalker & Others.
Stalker, R., P., 1985. Oxford University Press; Oxford, United Kingdom

BOWDLERIZE – To edit, doctor, or otherwise twist a text for your own meaning. Often used when describing the euphemistic exploitation of previously existing texts by totalitarian regimes. Taken from the name of Thomas Bowdler, infamous Draka propagandist, who re-wrote the works of Shakespeare.

‘The editors of your newspaper bowdlerized by quotation to make me look like an idiot!’
 
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That
Chapter Three

View attachment 789302

Extract taken from a section on the Winter 2009 Season section of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s website: ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’
TheRoyalShakespeareCompany.com. Stratford, United Kingdom, 2009

Introduction

Thomas Bowdler is among the most celebrated dramatists in Draka history. Born to a banking family in Bath, England, Bowdler settled in Draka in 1781 following extensive travels in Europe and Africa. It was during this time that he adopted the characteristic mysticism present in all his plays, wed no less than five women, and became one of the earliest converts to Esoteric Draka Paganism.

In a career which spanned from his first play in 1791 to his beheading in 1833 he wrote 86 plays, 33 books, and 401 poems. His four adaptations of Shakespeare plays for the Draka audience were written in the period 1818-1822, and saw Bowdler edit, recontextualize, and remove elements he thought unsuitable or ideologically improper. This quartet – ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’, ‘Hamlet the Draka’, ‘Bad King John’, and ‘Titus Draconicus’ – are considered the jewels in the crown of Draka theatre.

Synopsis

A messenger arrives at the encampment of Dinkane, King of Europa, with word that Makbet and Banqcwuou have defeated the combined armies of Xhosa and Zululand, lead by the traitor Thane of Rajput, MakTheodahad, who has taken a Xhosa wife. Dinkane asks for proof of their victory, and the messenger presents him with MakTheodahad’s severed head.

Makbet and Banqcwuou, returning home, are met by three witches. They greet Makbet as ‘Thane of Dun Thalia, Thane of Rajput, and King hereafter.’ The witches tell Banqcwuou he shall be, ‘less than Makbet, yet more’ and that he shall sire kings. Perplexed, the two men rape and slay the witches, then continue on to Dun Thalia.

Upon his return, Dinkane and Lady Makbet welcome Makbet home. Once they are alone Makbet tells Lady Makbet and her serf handmaiden Maudlin of the witches’ prophesy. She is sceptical, though Maudlin encourages Makbet to seize the crown. At a celebratory banquet, Dinkane proclaims Makbet the new Thane of Rajput.

Convinced of the veracity of the prophesy Makbet and Maudlin together scheme to murder Malcolm in his sleep and lay the blame on his mamluk guards. After drugging the mamluks, Makbet murders Dinkane and his son Malcolm, plants the dagger on the incapacitated mamluks and returns to bed. The next morning, Makduf, the chief of Dinkane’s mamluk bodyguards, arrives and executes the two men charged with guarding the king.

Makbet starts to grow more and more paranoid, believing that Lady Makbet and Banqcwuou might suspect his part in Dinkane’s death. At a banquet, Lady Makbet reveals she is pregnant and Banqcwuou announces that he and his son will be returning to their home that night. Makbet recruits two murderers and sends them after Banqcwuou’s party. They are joined by a masked third murderer on the road, slay Banqcwuou, but allow his son to escape in a moment of weakness.

At a banquet held for his men, Makbet dances and makes merry, however he is disturbed by the appearance of Banqcwuou’s ghost. Lady Makbet sends the revellers away and tries to console her husband. Later, Makbet receives the third murderer, who informs him of Banqcwuou’s death and his son’s escape. Makbet angrily reprimands the third murderer and asks him why he failed in his task. In response, the third murderer unmasks revealing himself to be Hastur the Unspeakable, the God of Agriculture and Soil in Esoteric Draka Paganism. Makbet demands he show him the truth of the witches’ prophecy. Hastur replies that no man born of a woman will kill Makbet, that he must beware Makduf, and that his reign will only end when the forests of Africa march on Europa. Heading this prophecy, Makbet proceeds to impale Makduf’s wife and daughter on stakes, though Makduf himself escapes.

Lady Makbet, increasingly guilt ridden over the crimes her husband has committed, kills herself and Makbet’s unborn child. Makbet is unmoved by her death, ‘she would have died hereafter’, and resolves to have a child with Maudlin. Makduf arrives in Africa and gathers an army of Xhosa and Zulus to attack Makbet. As they approach Dun Thalia, the Africans chop down trees, and use their branches as battle standards. Maudlin, upon seemingly seeing the trees approach from her balcony, throws herself from the castle, causing Makbet to despair and deliver the ‘Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow’ soliloquy.

As the Africans overrun the castle Makbet and Makduf come face to face. Makbet boasts that no man born of a woman may kill him. Makduf reveals that he was born to a Zulu isangoma, and was thus, ‘not of a weakly woman’s womb conveyed.’ After cutting off Makbet’s head Makduf declares himself King of Europa. The play ends on an, apparently, hopeful note with Banqcwuou’s son arriving in a new, tropical land which they subjugate and christen Drakia.

Analysis

On its surface, ‘Makbet of Dun Thalia’ serves as a simple, racist fairy-tale. The brave soldier Makbet allows himself to be seduced by the wicked, wanton serf woman Maudlin and pays the ultimate price for miscegenation. The play is very much informed by the Draka Pagan religion, Rajput and Dun Thalia (in addition to being the names of major Draka cities) are two of the mythological heavenly kingdoms which supposedly existed in Europe thousands of years ago. The play’s ending draws on the allegorical foundation myth for the Draka people.

A revisionist approach to the play has been popular since Arthur Miller’s 1948 production at the New York Idlewild Theatre. Instead of a strong-willed and cunning warrior lead astray by a seducing serf, Makbet is instead a brutal tyrant whose overthrow by the Africans is a moment of liberation. Maudlin and Lady Makbet are, here, victims of Makbet’s lust as much as they are agents of their own fate. Maudlin’s support for Makbet can be read as her trying to direct his violence towards the nation and away from herself.

According to Miller, this is a play about the good-hearted proletarian serfs overthrowing bad-hearted masters. Indeed, the only character in this play who acts selflessly at all is Makduf the Mamluk, a serf. A faithful servant to Dinkane unto his master’s death he undertakes his invasion of Europa with the express intent of avenging his slain relatives. In this reading Banqcwuou’s son conquering Drakia is not a happy ending but rather a sad reminder of the cyclical nature of history.

Main Cast

Makbet, thane of Dun Thalia – Christopher Eccleston

Lady Makbet, Makbet’s wife – Tracey Ann Oberman

Maudlin, Makbet’s serf – Billie Piper

Banqcwuou, a general – Robert Carlyle

Dinkane, king of Europa – Jim Broadbent

Makduf, Dinkane’s mamluk – Kayvan Novak

Extract taken from ‘Cyclopaedia Britannica’ by Richard P. Stalker & Others.
Stalker, R., P., 1985. Oxford University Press; Oxford, United Kingdom

BOWDLERIZE – To edit, doctor, or otherwise twist a text for your own meaning. Often used when describing the euphemistic exploitation of previously existing texts by totalitarian regimes. Taken from the name of Thomas Bowdler, infamous Draka propagandist, who re-wrote the works of Shakespeare.

‘The editors of your newspaper bowdlerized by quotation to make me look like an idiot!’
picture is gonna give me nightmares,lol. Where did you find it?
 
Chapter Four
Chapter Four

1668551962484.png

Extract taken from ‘Cyclopaedia Britannica’ by Richard P. Stalker & Others.
Stalker, R., P., 1985. Oxford University Press; Oxford, United Kingdom

TREKBURGHER – Term for lower-class Draka who embarked upon ‘the Trek’ into the African continental interior during the period 1720-1880. Generally inhabited large, reinforced plantations. Famously, independent, resilient, and religiously diverse.

Extract taken from ‘AQA: Early Modern History – Drakia from 1620 to 1870’ by Mary Whitestead & Others.
Whitestead, M., 2019. AQA Publishing; Manchester, United Kingdom.

Important selected dates in Early Draka History: 1710 – 1730

1710 –Outbreak of the Bush War. Formation of the Royal Drakian Militia.

1713 – First Mamluk Legion recruited from free coloured population of Drakia.

1714 – Founding of Fredericksburg. (today: Archona)

1716 – Battle of Breede River. Single deadliest battle of the Bush War with 500 colonists killed.

1718 – Expulsion of Bushpeople into the Great Fish River Basin and extinction of Bushpeople culture west of the Great Swart Mountains.

1720 – Formal end of the Bush War.

1722 – Cape Horn Acts passed in Parliament offering free transportation of colonists from Britain to the Cape.

1724 – Formation of the Drakian First Horse Legion.

Extract taken from ‘The Mind Of A Snake: A Military History of the Draka’ by Oliver North.
North, O., 1978. U.S. Naval Press; Subic Bay Military District, U.S.A.

The so-called Trekburghers ran into increasing difficulties with over-extended supply lines. Worse still, as the Draka expanded their reach beyond the Jupiter Mountains [1] and into the north-eastern range through the late 1720s they found themselves in renewed conflict with the Bushmen. Devastated by smallpox Bushmen now operated in smaller bands, usually based around single families. Many groups in the mountain lowlands had abandoned the nomadic lifestyle of their ancestors, and taken to hunting and gathering, rendering the usual salted earth tactics useless against them.

Bushmen guerrilla warfare was countered in two ways. Firstly by the reorganisation of the Trekburghers into ‘lochos’ – groups of four infantry sticks that were highly mobile, highly flexible and could rapidly respond to local threats. The second was by leaning on the Draka’s main force multiplier, their horses. The first cavalry unit in the colonies’ history was created in 1724, and this First Horse Legion was deployed against the Asian-San in 1725. Since Bushmen at this point in their history still lacked domesticated horses, the horse legions of the Trekburghers overwhelmed them.

Popular imagination has transformed these early cavalry units into horse armies on the scale of the Mongols or the Huns. Though they were certainly less numerous I do think there is merit in this comparison. Tellingly, the scale of their atrocities were limited only by the number of their enemies. As of 1733 perhaps 7,400 Bushmen had been, proportionally a far higher casualty rate than was achieved by any of the steppe conquerors. ‘Draka!’ Was the battle cry of these units and by the end of the century Drakian had been elided to Draka in common parlance.

By the late 1700s, the Bushpeople were finally destroyed as a nation. Those that surrendered to the Draka were enslaved and were commonly employed as gamekeepers or as agricultural workers tending sheep and cattle. Those that fled further east encountered the Bantu-speaking Nguni peoples and their language and religion were incorporated in those societies along with them.

A far more substantial challenge to the Draka emerged as they expanded their colony eastwards. In the lush lowlands at the confluence of the Great Fish and White Knife [2] rivers, a region the Trekburghers named New Stirlingshire, the Draka would encounter one of their most persistent and organised enemies: the Xhosa.

Extract taken from ‘The Land Of Drake: Native Cultures Of Southern Africa During The First Two Hundred Years Of The Anglo-Saxon Conquest’ by Kane Tsvangirai.
Tsvangirai, K., 2005. Raptor Books Inc.; Havana, Cuba, U.S.A.

Xhosa society had grown increasingly militarised towards the end of the 18th century. The disturbance wrought by the Draka colonization of the Cape had generated a tidal wave of Khoisan refugees flooding into the Great Fish basin. They spread smallpox and other European diseases which ravaged local populations. This emptying of the territories of New Stirlingshire allowed to expansionistic Xhosa to drive eastwards.

Their society was highly militarized. Boys were trained to fight, becoming warriors at the age of eighteen, upon which they were ritually circumcised. Xhosa kings commanded large armies, with younger mean leading the vanguard, whilst the older men protected their leaders at the rear. Settled agriculturalists, their population and armies were large. They possessed iron weapons, usually in the form of elongated, fluted throwing spears with a shorter spear used for close quarters combat.

Like many Bantu peoples the wealth of their nation was measured in the number of cattle they possessed, and to this end wars were usually fought for chattel. Cows were also the plunder of war with victorious armies driving huge herds before them on their marches home. Alleged Xhosa theft of Trekburgher stock was what triggered the first clashes between these two expanding empires.

Extract taken from ‘Had I The Wings Of A Turtledove: Theatre, Radio, & Cinema of the Draka’ by Evelyn Lascelles.
Lascelles, E., 1966. New Imperial Press; Paris, Kingdom of the French

Although minstrel shows and mummer’s farces were performed by soldiers of the Royal Drakian Militia, professional theatrics in the Crown Colony of Drakia are generally agreed to have begun with the 1720 opening of the Fredericksburg Palace Theatre by English actor John Thomas. Conservative and traditional in its output, the Palace saw performances of Shakespeare and Marlowe.

In 1738, the Palace presented Richard Thomas’s ‘Ahura-Mazda’ the first play written by a Draka and performed on a Draka stage. Since this piece concerned the Zoroastrian tradition and featuring Persian characters it created an uproar amongst the puritanical protestant population with the Bishop of Fredericksburg stating: “To indulge this taste for playgoing any longer means nothing more or less than the excitement of sinful behaviour in our colony and the loss of that most valuable treasure: the immortal soul.”

Stifled by the conservative atmosphere in Fredericksburg, many actors chose to join the Trekburghers on their march to the interior. By the 1740s most of those undergoing the trek were impoverished refugees, usually transported to the colony by the British government under the Cape Horn Act, and thus lacking the aristocratic prudishness of those in the capital.

In the frontier cities theatre thrived, with many a famous playwright having their first piece performed on stages made from Baobab wood. Here, the first examples of the Repetitive Epic genre can be found. In its simplest form, the Repetitive Epic follows successive generations (usually three, but in longer tales there can be up to eight) of the same family as they progressively overcome steeper obstacles to prosperity and happiness.

[1] OTL Piketberg Mountains

[2] OTL Sundays River
 
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This is really cool. I love how you're delving into the media and culture of this Alt Draka, as many TLs prefer to focus on military or political history.
 
This is really cool. I love how you're delving into the media and culture of this Alt Draka, as many TLs prefer to focus on military or political history.
Thank you very much. I often think the social side of history is missing in a lot of TLs, we're all shaped by the stories we're told after all.
 
Are the Draka advertising for settlers and developers in the European newspapers? Do they have representatives or agents in various countries? Would they be willing to grant land to military veterans?
 
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