Simple discoveries that would radically change ancient times or middle ages?

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by SeaCambrian, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. Albert.Nik Well-Known Member

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    Also shall I add these things? More advanced irrigation and canal building.
     
  2. Marc reformed polymath... Donor

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    As I noted in a similar thread very recently: Optics. Very feasible, utterly transformational. Within a handful of centuries human civilization is different down to the bones.
     
  3. Jürgen Well-Known Member

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    A earlier spread of paper from China to Europe would transform the Roman Empire, it would allow easier spread of information, improve the Roman bureaucracy and allow the Roman Empire to easier control its territory.

    Earlier blast furnaces and heavy ploughs being introduced to Europe would result in population explosion north of the Alps.
     
  4. elkarlo Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, more jarring than canning. Caning would be ASB pre 1830s or so imho.
     
  5. Diego Well-Known Member

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    This! Paper is a hundred times more necessary to the spread of information than the printing press.
     
  6. CountDVB Dual Emperor of the Aztech and Maychanical Empires

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    Given how glass blowing is an art form since antiquity, I could see this being plausible, even if it takes them a while to understand the advanced things

    Paper absolutely. Furthermore, it would change Arabia and possibly North Africa since their written language would see more usage and possibly change.

    The right to left writing style was a quirk because of using tablets if I recaall correctly so perhaps Arabic and other languages would become left tonrifht?
     
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  7. Lenwe Well-Known Member

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    1830? try 1730, now Seriously Canning was invented in 1809 By Nicolas Appert using Mason Jars and Wax seals, that are no more difficult to do in 1730 than in 1830
    I mean he used this
    [​IMG]

    Now metal Canning was perfectioned by the English based in the French Example in 1811 using wrought iron and done the cans on hand, a low process, but one you could do with the technological level of Europe in 1750-ish
     
  8. EWilanO Well-Known Member

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    The problem with early canning was the solder made from a tin and lead based alloy. Speaking of lead: an earlier discovery of the toxicity of lead could have far-reaching consequences.
     
  9. wcv215 Well-Known Member

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    Sorta true. You need a specific mixture of parts, but those ratios can be refined and made better over time. There isn’t just one ratio. Cannons and muskets used different mixtures for instance.
     
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  10. mosodake แป็นด์

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    That's what sauerkraut and other forms of lactofermented vegetables were traditionally used for: extended storage, improved taste, and increased vitamin content. Also, canning destroys a significant amount of vitamin C.
     
  11. Pesterfield Well-Known Member

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    Related to that, actual telegraph code.
    Once a code is developed for your alphabet you can send complex messages with just two signals(dot dash), or one turned on/off for a variable time.

    Or did you mean that instead of the multiple position type of semaphore?
     
  12. wcv215 Well-Known Member

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    About half of them in fact. That would still be better than none though.

    Diet can also be part of that however, since the best form of fruits and vegetables (raw) iirc weren’t really eaten often.
     
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  13. DreadDjinn Well-Known Member

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    D
    De rerum natura
     
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  14. SealTheRealDeal Well-Known Member

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    Double-entry accounting.
     
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  15. CountDVB Dual Emperor of the Aztech and Maychanical Empires

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    It already was known about pretty far back
     
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  16. SealTheRealDeal Well-Known Member

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    Yeah in the High Middle Ages, I'm thinking more like getting the Romans to actually sit down and learn how to economics.
     
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  17. EWilanO Well-Known Member

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    For that they would have to abandon Roman numerals, because they were one of the biggest barriers to the development of higher mathematics as anything other than addingor subtracting quickly becomes a pain in the [Insert random anatomical part].
     
  18. SealTheRealDeal Well-Known Member

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    Yeah perhaps they could adopt Persian numerals.
     
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  19. elkarlo Well-Known Member

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    True it does and pickled vegetables do hold vit c and canning destroyes it. But jarring woukd allow for other items to be preserved and allowing for better nutrition overall
     
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  20. elkarlo Well-Known Member

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    Ok very nice. I mean metal canning on an industrial like level. Which I thibk wouldn't be a viable option in the 1700s. I think it'd be a luxury. Like the wealthy enjoying some meat or fruit out of season.
     
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