For Thine is the Glory: Brazil and Integralism
"...almost disconsolate with grief; Salgado in his typically-prodigious diary had no entry for not only the day of Maria Amelia's funeral but for nearly two weeks afterwards, and his first entry after this uncharacteristic break stated bleakly, "I pray to God that I would be taken soon, too, so that I could join her; were it not for my mortal soul, as I stared at her coffin going into God's earthly embrace, I pondered what would come of it if I hurled myself in after her, to lie beneath the dirt as it was shoveled onto her and I simultaneously." Salgado's life in many ways seemed to have found its nadir in July 1919. He was a widower and wounded veteran, the writer of a thinly-read polemic newspaper in a country in the grips of a stagnant postwar economic depression it was attempting to claw its way out of like a rat in a bucket and with an unstable politics that was held together only by the fraying prestige of the Emperor and a mutual social hatred of the Argentine state.

It was only by chance that Salgado's life would soon change drastically and dramatically for the better, through a passing encounter at a dinner hosted by a mutual acquaintance in Rio de Janeiro with Gustavo Barroso, a man with whom Salgado's fate would be inextricably linked for the rest of both their lives, even as their friendship and political collaboration waxed and waned for both personal and ideological reasons. Barroso was an accomplished lawyer and journalist, born to a Brazilian father and German-immigrant mother in Fortaleza, who had like a great many Brazilian conservatives dabbled in socialism in their youth before shifting hard to the right during the 1910s, particularly in the shadow of the war. Barroso had been a member of the Congress of Deputies for his native province of Ceara, representing the then-dominant Conservative Party, and had held a handful of ministerial posts in Fortaleza where he had crushed strike actions in Ceara during the war; he had offered to serve on the front, but had been rejected in circumstances that were admittedly murky, though they would never suffer much interrogation during Barroso's lengthy political career. Of all young, mainstream figures of the Brazilian right who were unassociated with the more volatile Nationalist Association, Barroso was one who clearly had a future, especially with the powerful post-slavery plantation owners of the North.

Perhaps more importantly than his political endeavors at that time, however, was his impeccable credentials as one of Brazil's leading folklorists, an interest of his that had translated into a position within the Brazilian Academy of Letters. He had written both his own novels and essays on the essence of Brazilian folklore, and his fascination with Brazil as a literary entity - its contradictions, its potential, its unique geography and linguistic isolation in South America - would in time come to form some of the more esoteric and romantic foundations of Brazilian Integralism as an ideology unique and separate from the more traditionalist integralism of Europe. Barroso was precisely the type of friend and advocate whom Salgado could trust and be influenced by in his darkest hour, and Barroso immediately keened to Salgado's enormous talent as a writer and the depth of his thinking regarding, as he put it, "what ails the Empire." The two took up a habit of sending gracious letters to one another in which they amicably debated politics, literature and religion, and Barroso by November persuaded Salgado to move to Rio de Janeiro to take up writing there, noting to him that "his talents are wasted upon the layabouts and illiterates of Sao Bento." Salgado would later note, almost three decades later, that Barroso's clear contempt for "Brazil's most pious city" should have given him more pause than it did, but at the time he was a man adrift, seeing "the ghost of my wife" around every corner in the town, and his budding friendship with one of Brazil's most influential literary figures was the most alive he had felt since losing Maria Amelia. [1] On November 20, 1919, he made arrangements to live in a small single-room apartment in Rio de Janeiro above a German butcher, and left Sao Bento for good.

Salgado's arrival in Rio de Janeiro came at a fortuitous time - it arrived at the beginning of what even then was being hailed as a revival of Brazilian culture and literature, springing from cafes full of writers, poets and scholars who spent much of their day sipping mate and coffee deep in intense debate, a debate often steeped in nationalist fervor. This was cultivated by an Academy of Letters that had shifted from a spectrum of liberal-to-conservative ideas to a thoroughly reactionary institution in a matter of years, lorded over imperiously by Euclides da Cunha [2] who was always on the lookout for bright young pupils to slide into open chairs in the Academy whom he could cultivate. It was the Rio de Janeiro that was abuzz not only with the angry populism of Isaias de Noronha or the boiling revolutionary sentiment of the working class and many junior officers, but a cultural establishment that viewed itself as the only barrier between Brazil and chaos, a Rio de Janeiro that was deeply polarized over the writings of Limo Barreto and what it suggested about Brazil, its vitoria mutilada, and what correlation social malaise and degeneracy had with it.

And in this context, despite many months of struggles and increasing despair that his writing would take off in the pond where he was now a very little fish, came Salgado's introductions to not only his hero Barreto but also, in time, Cunha himself, and the cultivation of a relationship that would quickly propel him to new heights of literary renown..."

- For Thine is the Glory: Brazil and Integralism

[1] This is not intended to be gay-coded, but considering the correlation between reactionary politics and closeted homosexuality in many societies, you are welcome to interpret this that way if you want.
[2] Here he did not die in 1909 - thank you to @Taunay for this idea
 
iOtl, While the Venezuelans had produced some oil before 1922, it was a big blowout in 1922 that brought the country significant notice as an oil producer. It might actually be earlier ittl given the German money flowing in. In any case, there is likely to be a small window for Brazilian interference before someone focuses on it as an oil producer. It is likely to be a wild place in terms of US, German and Brazilian Influence during and after the war.
Venezuela is a particularly live playground for US interests vs. those of Brazil and (spoilers) Germany once German-American geopolitical cooperation starts to dwindle
Ecuador being one of two countries in South America with no border with Brazil, maybe Brazil would like to interfere in the other one as well? (I *think* the same countries border each other in South America as Otl (other than no Peru/Chile border, which is replaced by Bolivia/Ocean)
I need to think more about my long term plans for Ecuador
ABB stands for what again...? Please add 'America' to the end so the acronym becomes ABBA..... Do it for the sake of awesomeness (and the lulz)
Jesus Christ haha
 
1719082351896.png
 
Some foreshadowing about borassa (was he the super antisemite I don’t remember) hopefully Salgado can fix brazils problems (both real and imagined)
 
And the countries of the world iOtl that complain about the number of Guns that the Average USAian owns relative to other countries, now have an independent Texas and a Warlordism level of Guns in the CSA ittl.
Not to touch on current Pol too much but the contours of the gun control
Some foreshadowing about borassa (was he the super antisemite I don’t remember) hopefully Salgado can fix brazils problems (both real and imagined)
Correct - Barraso was such a virulent anti-Semite that Salgado kept him at arms length, especially since Brazil has a minimal Jewish population
 
What were salgados economic policies and the policies of his movement was it just corporatism or something else (also what form of corporatism which I just learned has multiple forms)
 
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What were salgados economic policies and the policies of his movement was it just corporatism or something else (also what form of corporatism which I just learned has multiple forms)
As far as I can tell (and granted I haven't researched it too much) it was fairly standard corporatism, one reason why he was an off-and-on supporter of Vargas
Idk whether to post it here or in Eu thread but any future plans with Antoun Saadeh ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoun_Saadeh ) and his Ultranationalist Syrian Social Nationalist Party? ( https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Social_Nationalist_Party )
This is more of an EU thread q but, also, I'd never heard of this guy before so no plans lol
 
@KingSweden24
What happened to MacArthur?
Well, Douglas I mean...

Considering that Arthur MacArthur Jr married a virginian lady (Confederate lady in Atl), and had 3 sons, Arthur, Douglas and Malcolm, does that still happen? They'd be mid20s during the GAW

I'm just curious, considering that Arthur MacArthur would have been an impressive figure to look up to as a father, and Douglas....well, the overachiever and blow hard. Quite a massive ego, be hard to keep him quiet...
 
@KingSweden24

If you need a name for a book or series of books about the Mexican Emperors, I offer "The Eagle's Throne" as a good title. Both because The Eagle's Throne makes a perfect metronym for the Mexican monarchy as a whole... and because there's some links to OTL Mexico, because for a republic, we've had extremely swanky totally-not-thrones-they're-just-chairs for our heads of state, to the point that there's a few idioms that use the Presidential Chair as a synonym of the Presidency itself, much like how you'd use the throne in a monarchy.

And the chairs in question can get pretty... hm. Fancy. Here's (a reproduction of) Juarez's, as an example:

800px-SillaPresidencial2.jpg

And our modern presidents haven't been immune to the irresistuble allure that comes from sitting upon The Fancy Chair. Behold!
5da91112049d2e54b728c32647ef1870--the-mexican-the-president.jpg
 
@KingSweden24

If you need a name for a book or series of books about the Mexican Emperors, I offer "The Eagle's Throne" as a good title. Both because The Eagle's Throne makes a perfect metronym for the Mexican monarchy as a whole... and because there's some links to OTL Mexico, because for a republic, we've had extremely swanky totally-not-thrones-they're-just-chairs for our heads of state, to the point that there's a few idioms that use the Presidential Chair as a synonym of the Presidency itself, much like how you'd use the throne in a monarchy.

And the chairs in question can get pretty... hm. Fancy. Here's (a reproduction of) Juarez's, as an example:

View attachment 914176
And our modern presidents haven't been immune to the irresistuble allure that comes from sitting upon The Fancy Chair. Behold!
View attachment 914177
Fancy chairs indeed, TIL Mexican government chairs are as fancy as those crazy cartel boots.
 
@KingSweden24
What happened to MacArthur?
Well, Douglas I mean...

Considering that Arthur MacArthur Jr married a virginian lady (Confederate lady in Atl), and had 3 sons, Arthur, Douglas and Malcolm, does that still happen? They'd be mid20s during the GAW

I'm just curious, considering that Arthur MacArthur would have been an impressive figure to look up to as a father, and Douglas....well, the overachiever and blow hard. Quite a massive ego, be hard to keep him quiet...
Had no particular plans for Douglas so him being butterflied under my “Obama Rule” would not be a huge loss to the TL.

Arthur MacArthur for what it’s worth was Army COS during a stretch of the Hearst years
@KingSweden24

If you need a name for a book or series of books about the Mexican Emperors, I offer "The Eagle's Throne" as a good title. Both because The Eagle's Throne makes a perfect metronym for the Mexican monarchy as a whole... and because there's some links to OTL Mexico, because for a republic, we've had extremely swanky totally-not-thrones-they're-just-chairs for our heads of state, to the point that there's a few idioms that use the Presidential Chair as a synonym of the Presidency itself, much like how you'd use the throne in a monarchy.

And the chairs in question can get pretty... hm. Fancy. Here's (a reproduction of) Juarez's, as an example:

View attachment 914176
And our modern presidents haven't been immune to the irresistuble allure that comes from sitting upon The Fancy Chair. Behold!
View attachment 914177
Oh hell yeah, love me some gaudy Latin swag
Actually this reminds me how is mexicos nobility/aristocracy doing
We’ll get a Louis Maximilian/Reyes update before long
Are we visiting Souf Efrika soon?
I have no particularly interesting Souf Efrika ideas for the short term so, alas, prob not
 
I have no particularly interesting Souf Efrika ideas for the short term so, alas, prob not
Maybe looking at how things are going for non-white South Africans (Black, Indian and Coloured) in the SA Dominion with the Cape franchise intact (despite property qualifications being present) and how not going full Apartheid is going to impact socio-economic development?
 
@KingSweden24

If you need a name for a book or series of books about the Mexican Emperors, I offer "The Eagle's Throne" as a good title. Both because The Eagle's Throne makes a perfect metronym for the Mexican monarchy as a whole... and because there's some links to OTL Mexico, because for a republic, we've had extremely swanky totally-not-thrones-they're-just-chairs for our heads of state, to the point that there's a few idioms that use the Presidential Chair as a synonym of the Presidency itself, much like how you'd use the throne in a monarchy.

And the chairs in question can get pretty... hm. Fancy. Here's (a reproduction of) Juarez's, as an example:

View attachment 914176
And our modern presidents haven't been immune to the irresistuble allure that comes from sitting upon The Fancy Chair. Behold!
View attachment 914177
This is the kind of furniture that wouldn't feel out of place for a monarchy, not gonna lie.
 
Ferdinand: The Last Emperor
"...distraction from Austria's retreat through May and early June behind the Tagliamento and expectation that Italy would counterattack successfully across their positions there towards the much more fortified Isonzo before long; within weeks, a massive triumph now seemed to augur a gargantuan and historic defeat on two fronts. The fall of Bielitz on May 20 after sixty days of hard fighting in that sector and the overrunning of Teschen on May 28 was the first major German success on the Bohemian front since the fall of Eger on the second day of the war. The loss of Teschen was considerably worse than the breakthrough Germany had achieved in her siege of Mahrisch Schonberg, capturing that city on May 18; while the Morava Valley was critical, of course, it was Teschen which had quickly become a symbolic battle in the front around Ostrau, and which severed from the defenders at the Moravian Gates the railroads to Galicia along the north of the Carpathians.

This was a massive strategic dilemma for the Austrian high command. While Magyar intransigence had not yet reared its head to the extent Ferdinand and von Dankl had feared, the Honved had nonetheless not mobilized at the speed which they had hoped and it was the Landwehr and Common Army still doing the bulk of the defending across all fronts, though more and more Magyars had been routed to the Italian sector. The dependence on Hungary was also now a geograpic one, with reinforcements to prevent a German capture of Krakow and eastern Galicia now having to share the often single-tracked trans-Carpathian railroads with critical oil shipments, which until the fall of Bielitz had remained just outside of German artillery range, and now opened up a path for a German attack against Ostrau's eastern defenses, potentially breaking through the Austrian force on its right flank.

It was the tale of the Central European War, though, that just when one side began to see an advantage, it suddenly reversed. Yes, Galician oil now had a more circuitous route to reach Bohemia and Lower Austria's critical defenses than it had before (or than the smaller but critical yields from the Matzenfeld near Vienna had), but Austrian forces quickly regrouped on either side of the German salient and frequent probing eastward attacks towards Krakow ran into firm walls of barbed wire, artillery and machine gun fire, much as in the blood-soaked grounds around the Moravian Gates; for every bombing raid over Ostrau or Krakow, the Germans lost several valuable planes to rudimentary anti-air fire, and hundreds of valuable young men in fruitless offensives.

The darkness suddenly saw a tremendous light in on June 8 as well, a day after the Germans marched out of Mahrisch Schonberg, south towards Olmutz. The contours of the offensive of twenty-four divisions was simple enough - an attack fifty short kilometers down the Morava to the industrial center of Olmutz, which the German commander Erich von Ludendorff aimed to capture, thus directly threatening the Brunn-Ostrau railroad and the major crossroads at Prerau, in many ways the heart of the trans-Moravian transport network. A victory at Olmutz would cut off Ostrau further and almost force Austria's hand in retreat, lest the defenders of the Gates be caught from behind or have their supply lines seized. Following the capture of Mahrisch Schonberg two weeks earlier, there was an increasing sense of the German high command that the Austrian defenses, though spirited, were beginning to wilt, and the heart of Bohemia was now theirs for the taking.

The Battle of Loschitz, also known as the Battle of the Morava, ended such sentiment. The head of the Austro-Hungarian Third Army, Archduke Joseph Ferdinand, had withdrawn his forces back across the widening Morava Valley with defensive positions set up in the hills to either side and weight of his forces behind a roughly thirty kilometers wide line south of the villages of Loschitz and Sternberg. As Ludendorff marched forward and moved his more than three hundred thousand men into the flat open land north and east of Loschitz, the attack began early on the morning of June 8, with a hammer and anvil attack on the right (western) bank of the Morava, smashing Ludendorff's right wing into the river itself with artillery fire from hidden positions in the forested hills. As Ludendorff scrambled to draw his men towards the primary engagement around Loschitz, the Austrians bent back their left flank and pressed it north, threatening Ludendorff's entire army with being surrounded. It was too much maneuvering for trenches to be dug, too many men on too small a territory, and Austrian air power, always a limited threat in the early days of the war, began to reveal itself in the skies as planes and airship launched from fields safely south of Olmutz. It was a massive rout - sixty thousand Germans were surrounded and captured at Loschitz proper, twenty thousand casualties were sustained by Ludendorff's army in less than two days, and a shambolic retreat saw numerous disproportionately bloody skirmishes as Ludendorff tucked his tail between his legs back to Mahrisch Schonberg. Joseph Ferdinand positioned his army as a screening force at the hamlet of Schmole, at one of the narrowest points of the Morava Valley north of Olmutz, to maintain his men's fighting strength but also to keep Ludendorff bottled up.

It was an outright disaster for the Germans, on the heels of their frantic and unsuccessful attempts to score breakthroughs near Krakow and at Ostrau, increasingly reminiscent of the same failures of the French to break through at Luxemburg or the Saar. Though it portended a longer war, and more bloodshed, the victory at Loschitz nonetheless proved the morale boost in the wake of the humiliation at the Piave that Vienna needed, and with angry voices growing louder in both of the Dual Monarchy's capitals, it was a boost Ferdinand could certainly use..."

- Ferdinand: The Last Emperor
 
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