If the Second French Empire collapses during the CEW, I can imagine Her and De Gaulle going to exile (perhaps in Germany) and raise the two girls together.

Of course, in the immediate aftermath, the entire royal family is going to flee (Mostly likely to Britain). I would be really satisfiying if Her broke up with Nap V and fleeing with De Gaulle.
I think Napoleon V deserved the satisfaction of asking for a divorce, not his cheating wife.
 
No idea how plausible this is (I know next to nothing about post WWII France internal politics) but that's a hell of a POD for a TL.
Def! Might need to throw together a TLIAW on it
If the Second French Empire collapses during the CEW, I can imagine Her and De Gaulle going to exile (perhaps in Germany) and raise the two girls together.

Of course, in the immediate aftermath, the entire royal family is going to flee (Mostly likely to Britain). I would be really satisfiying if Her broke up with Nap V and fleeing with De Gaulle.
It’s… a weirdly romantic idea
The little pigeon is way too traditional Catholic to ever ask for a divorce.
def
I think they have a couple legitimate children, just that she has more with CdG on the side.

Not that that would stop an annulment if everyone wants one of course.
Also. This is correct. She has legit kids with him and then also with CdG
 
Austria, like almost all continental Europe, is not a common law system and thus does not have an adversarial justice system where the judge serves as a referee between defense and prosecution. Very crucially, civil law systems do not have juries, and case law is generally not as important as statutory law.
Adversarial justice systems aren't strictly incompatible with civil law systems (see: Latin America largely dumping the inquisitive model in favor of the accusatory one in recent decades), even if most civil law systems do have an inquisitive system. It's the primacy of statutory law over case law that really separates civil and common law systems.

But yeah, the use of an inquisitive system really helps make it feel like Vienna is putting their thumb on the scale, regardless of whether that is the case.

(No, this has nothing to do with the fact I just started the Penal Process Law subject in college. Okay, it has everything to do with it)
 
Chain Reaction
"...as late as the evening of February 28th, 1919, it still seemed unlikely that Germany would attack Austria and Belgium over the "acquittal heard around the world." Nonetheless, there was an escalating sense that something was about to go very wrong, and British Foreign Secretary the Marquess of Crewe sent a note to both Berlin and Austria on the morning of March 1st with an offer to "mediate." This was rebuffed later that afternoon by his Viennese counterpart; what was there to mediate, asked Count Berchtold? Austria had brought a case, tried Stephane Clement, and found the evidence insufficient to charge a European royal with murder, and had exiled him after his acquittal to make a point. "No one sympathizes with the man," Berchtold assured Crewe, "but that does not make him guilty."

Events were moving rapidly in Germany, where called to Berlin were the Kings of Bavaria and Saxony, men who typically dealt with Heinrich via envoy, a sort of internal ambassador to the Prussian, for that matter Imperial, court. [1] Heinrich gathered a group of German - and, critically, foreign - journalists in a room of the Stadtschloss and, flanked by Ludwig III and Friedrich Augustus, denounced the "release of the criminal Stephane Clement of Belgium," and, in an unusually unguarded moment, stated, "There will have to be consequences for what has occurred." What those consequences were, exactly, was unclear; on March 2nd, the German ambassador to Vienna was recalled to Berlin, though the embassy itself remained open.

The moment of tension worsened as Stephane Clement's train passed through Vorarlberg en route to Switzerland, very close to the German border, and was suddenly set upon by sporadic gunfire from the forests. Nobody was harmed even though several bullets managed to break train windows, but once in Switzerland, the Belgian prince drew the understandable conclusion that there had been an assassination attempt against him by German agents trying to avenge Prince Franz before he could escape into neutral Switzerland, which meant, also, that Austrian sovereignty had been directly violated in those moments. There is no record of German agents having passed into Vorarlberg to carry out the hit, but their placement, and the near-death of Karolyi in Zurich just a year earlier, certainly opened the question..."

- 1919: How Europe Went to War

"...the crisis stemming from Stephane Clement's acquittal could well have passed had France not deliberately escalated it, and indeed the actions of the Poincaré government in those days of early March were held up for decades to come as clearly carrying responsibility for the bloodshed to come.

On March 2nd, the Poincaré Cabinet had a good deal of information before them. They knew that Stephane Clement's acquittal had offended Germany enough that Berlin's minister to Vienna had been withdrawn (as had Bavaria's envoys); they knew that three German monarchs had gathered in Berlin at the same time as the Kaiser's private war cabinet, and that symbolically that gathering was meant to draw a hard line on defining a Germany that excluded Austria; and they knew that Stephane Clement's train had been shot at in the Alps as it approached the Swiss frontier. A conclusion Poincaré and Paleologue could have drawn from this was that the hour was tense and hot words were flying, but that it was highly unlikely that Germany would go to war over the outcome of a criminal trial.

Castelnau drew a different conclusion - that Germany was retrenching, and preparing for conflict. He predicted that what would follow would be a demand from Germany for Stephane Clement to be turned over by Belgium to face justice, and when this did not occur, would declare war. His solution, then, was a preliminary mobilization by France and Belgium to prevent a German invasion. Castelnau also predicted that, as the nations of Europe turned one-by-one against Germany, that Britain would join in the fighting to safeguard Belgian neutrality, and Russia may be persuaded to join the fray, too, while Italy remained out.

Poincaré proposed that the Cabinet take a vote on March 2nd, and they did, voting nearly unanimously in favor of war. However, Emperor Napoleon, when confronted with this sequence of events, refused to sign the mobilization order, asking that the Cabinet "pray on the matter" for a night and then reconvene in the late morning of the 3rd. The Emperor was not a pacifist, necessarily, but to his credit was highly skeptical of the Hofburg Affair as a cassus belli and if he was being honest did not really want to go to war with Germany over it. He had supported Belgium to the hilt throughout the fall at the cost of his already near-failed marriage, and he wanted to give the Cabinet one last chance to take a deep breath and ponder whether to actually step into the brink.

Several Cabinet ministers appeared to be wavering in the hours thereafter, but Poincaré, Paleologue, and several other ministers dined that night with several members of the General Staff who spoke enthusiastically of their ability to quickly prosecute a war against Germany and "race to the Rhine;" also in attendance that evening was the Dowager Empress Eugenie, who according to Paleologue's postwar memoir "put steel in our spines and the fear of God in our hearts." While those at that dinner were not the fence-sitters, it nonetheless gave them the confidence to grind down those who were.

On March 3rd, then, the French General Staff received signed orders from Emperor Napoleon V to mobilize the Army; they had already suspended leave for French soldiers two days earlier. Later that same day, the Belgian General Staff did the same, and began shifting their Reserve Army into the Liege fortification system while the bulk of their army was assembled and equipped to be moved towards Eupen and Aachen..."

- La Politique Mondiale: Poincaré, France and the Waltz of the Great Powers

"...news of the French mobilization on March 3-4 stunned the Hofburg; Ferdinand had been alarmed at the evacuation of the chief German diplomats from Vienna, and now this seemed to confirm what he already feared - that war was on the horizon. Austria had an excellent domestic security service but a mediocre foreign intelligence network, but the French Deuxieme Bureau was widely regarded as the best spy bureau in the world (albeit at a time when intelligence services were in their infancy). Thus, his Cabinet concluded in a meeting late in the evening of March 4, if the French believed there was a reason to mobilize, it had to be a good one, and Andrassy argued for his part that this was the evidence Austria had always needed that France would, indeed, be there when it counted most. Dankl concurred and urged Ferdinand to mobilize the entire Common Army while leaving the Honved and Heimwehr in reserve for the time being; if Austria did not meet the moment when France mobilized to defend her preemptively, then the alliance network which protected Austria would collapse. Ferdinand admitted later in his diaries that he mulled waiting for confirmation of German mobilization before countersigning the drafted order, but then thought better of it and ordered Austrian mobilization shortly before eight o' clock at night. The Iron Triangle had, officially, been activated..."

- Ferdinand: The Last Emperor

"...
Germany caught word of French preliminary mobilization on March 4, and Heinrich was stunned. Germany had been mulling their options but had, at least in those early days, intended to keep the crisis primarily diplomatic, likely by imposing punitive tariffs on Austrian goods and cutting trade ties to Belgium, all in an effort to find a negotiation settlement down the line. The German General Staff took a vote on March 4 to mobilize in turn out of an abundance of caution, with Falkenhayn informing Heinrich that once the "machine was turned on" it meant war. The German stance, however, was that France had engaged in a preemptive mobilization to attack Germany, and news of Austrian soldiers and reservists being called in meant the Iron Triangle was now fully active. German war plans were dusted off, and the 12th of March was identified as the day to initiate hostilities, which wound up slipping by a day in the end.

While popular historiography often read into the events of March 2-5 a sort of ebullience about the prospect of war, cheered on by nationalist press, there was a great deal of apprehensiveness across Europe. Nonetheless, war was about to happen - France needed a war when it could still be sure of certain advantages against Germany, and Austria needed a war to hold Hungarian fervor at bay. For a brief moment on March 6, German policymakers began to wonder what they had done as men were called to their armies throughout Saxony, Bavaria and Silesia ahead of offensive moves; they were sated by news that Italy was mobilizing as well, with Rome viewing the Franco-Austrian move as being deliberately hostile. Both alliance blocs were triggered by movements they considered to be acts of offense by their enemies, and the lines were drawn.

The war had begun."

- The Central European War

[1] The German Empire was an inefficient mess, part 1017
 
Adversarial justice systems aren't strictly incompatible with civil law systems (see: Latin America largely dumping the inquisitive model in favor of the accusatory one in recent decades), even if most civil law systems do have an inquisitive system. It's the primacy of statutory law over case law that really separates civil and common law systems.

But yeah, the use of an inquisitive system really helps make it feel like Vienna is putting their thumb on the scale, regardless of whether that is the case.

(No, this has nothing to do with the fact I just started the Penal Process Law subject in college. Okay, it has everything to do with it)
My thinking was there was no formal pressure on the court, but enough informal pressure that it looks fixed to an outside observer
How is Siam/Thailand geopoliticaly speaking, would they be up to help Germany in the Indochina region?
They are “neutral” but clearly Germany-favoring
Is US Bistandard backing?
Or was it repealedby Liberals?
Bimetallism never went away, but Liberals never adjusted the rate off 8:1.
 
"...news of the French mobilization on March 3-4 stunned the Hofburg; Ferdinand had been alarmed at the evacuation of the chief German diplomats from Vienna, and now this seemed to confirm what he already feared - that war was on the horizon. Austria had an excellent domestic security service but a mediocre foreign intelligence network, but the French Deuxieme Bureau was widely regarded as the best spy bureau in the world (albeit at a time when intelligence services were in their infancy). Thus, his Cabinet concluded in a meeting late in the evening of March 4, if the French believed there was a reason to mobilize, it had to be a good one, and Andrassy argued for his part that this was the evidence Austria had always needed that France would, indeed, be there when it counted most. Dankl concurred and urged Ferdinand to mobilize the entire Common Army while leaving the Honved and Heimwehr in reserve for the time being; if Austria did not meet the moment when France mobilized to defend her preemptively, then the alliance network which protected Austria would collapse. Ferdinand admitted later in his diaries that he mulled waiting for confirmation of German mobilization before countersigning the drafted order, but then thought better of it and ordered Austrian mobilization shortly before eight o' clock at night. The Iron Triangle had, officially, been activated..."

- Ferdinand: The Last Emperor
It wasnt an Austrian affair to get involved.
Stupid decision.
would, indeed, be there when it counted most
Did Franz Ferdinand really think that Germany ordered the hit and thats the moment of casus belli?
If not what the time that French Assistances counts most?
 
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However, Emperor Napoleon, when confronted with this sequence of events, refused to sign the mobilization order, asking that the Cabinet "pray on the matter" for a night and then reconvene in the late morning of the 3rd. The Emperor was not a pacifist, necessarily, but to his credit was highly skeptical of the Hofburg Affair as a cassus belli and if he was being honest did not really want to go to war with Germany over it.
This is where I, for at least the twelfth time, wish that Nappy IV was still running the show in France. In fairness to V, in a constitutional monarchy once the cabinet declares war there isn't much the Emperor can do without badly destabilizing the country.
 
Japan seizing Formosa from a European power has occurred in decades of darkness. Also, possibly France occupies Cambodia but as France is defeated, Cambodia, Vietnam, Mindanao etc become independent
 
Yes. He very nearly offered Henri d’Orleans the Presidency in the 1960s, which was widely understood as being a prelude to a restoration.

In the end CDG decided to run again himself instead
No idea how plausible this is (I know next to nothing about post WWII France internal politics) but that's a hell of a POD for a TL.
He ran again because he realized that there wasn’t any support for monarchism among the general populace in France after WW2.
 
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